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1965 Argentine legislative election

1965 Argentine legislative election
Argentina
← 1963 14 March 1965 1973 →

99 of 192 seats in the Chamber of Deputies
Turnout83.72%
Party % Seats +/–
Chamber of Deputies
Popular Union

31.12% 35 +31
People's Radical Civic Union

29.72% 34 −3
National Federation of Center Parties

7.38% 8 +2
Integration and Development Movement

6.01% 5 +5
Intransigent Radical Civic Union

4.52% 1 −19
Democratic Progressive Party

3.21% 3 −3
Argentine Socialist Party

2.06% 1 −2
Others

13.29% 12 −8
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.
Results by province

The Argentine legislative elections of 1965 were held on 14 March. Voters chose their legislators with a turnout of 83%.

Background

Augusto Vandor, whose strategic skill and call for "Peronism without Perón" allowed the UP to benefit from Illia's policy of Peronist inclusion.

The exiled populist leader, Juan Perón, continued to set the electoral agenda. The economy had recovered vigorously from the 1962-63 recession, and this only seemed to deprive voters and the media of a distraction away from speculation as to what steps Perón might take next to return to Argentina. This issue was highlighted by his failed December 1964 attempt to arrive in Buenos Aires - thwarted almost by accident. His still-sizable Peronist base, in turn, were divided between those who felt his return was critical to their political future, and those who sought alternatives. One of the most successful projects to these ends was the Popular Union (UP), a party founded within days of Perón's violent, September 1955 overthrow. Its founder, Juan Atilio Bramuglia, had been a close advisor of Perón's since the birth of the movement, in 1945. Bramuglia had been unable, however, to obtain support for the idea from Perón himself, who favored electoral alliances. Bramuglia died in 1962; but the failure of one such alliance in 1963 provided Popular Union supporters with their first realistic chance to represent the aging leader.[1]

The President, Dr. Arturo Illia, faced immediate pressure from the military and other anti-peronists to bar the Popular Union from fielding any candidates; but the moderate Illia refused. The adoption of the UP mantle by Steelworkers' leader Augusto Vandor defied Perón's call for open conflict with the Illia administration, moreover. The issue of the UP divided Vandor and his allies in the CGT from the CGT Secretary General, José Alonso, and his allies (including Andrés Framini, who had run on the UP ticket in 1962 and won, only to have the elections annulled). Vandor's very prominence made him the UP's paramount figure, and by extension, the first viable Peronist alternative to Perón in the movement's twenty years of existence.[2]

Despite fears this might trigger a coup, the elections proceeded on schedule. President Illia's centrist UCR did not benefit from economic growth, and they lost 4 seats. Former President Pedro Aramburu's anti-peronist UDELPA benefited even less from Perón's barely thwarted return, and they lost half their 14 seats. Former President Arturo Frondizi's MID, which had been barred from running by conservative opposition in 1963, picked up 16 seats in its first electoral test. This was significant because the MID had bested his former party, the UCRI (with which he had parted ways in 1963). The UCRI was left with but 11 of its 40 seats, the result of losing both Frondizi's and Perón's erstwhile support. Most of these seats went to the Popular Union, which gained 44. Its leader, Dr. Rodolfo Tecera del Franco, was elected Vice President of the Argentine Chamber of Deputies.[3]

The 1965 elections were a notable accomplishment for President Illia, who had stopped military interference against them without it immediately costing him the presidency.[3]

Results

Party Votes % Seats won Total seats
Popular Union (UP) 2,786,244 31.12 35 36
People's Radical Civic Union (UCRP) 2,660,937 29.72 34 69
National Federation of Center Parties (PD - PLCo - PACo) 661,108 7.38 8 14
Integration and Development Movement (MID) 538,057 6.01 5 6
Intransigent Radical Civic Union (UCRI) 404,689 4.52 1 19
Democratic Progressive Party (PDP) 287,250 3.21 3 9
Christian Democratic Party (PDC) 241,764 2.70 4
Argentine Socialist Party (PSA) 184,023 2.06 1 4
Union of the Argentine People (UDELPA) 181,094 2.02 8
Democratic Socialist Party (PSD) 170,362 1.90 2
Three Flags Party 148,067 1.65 2 4
Provincial Action 104,835 1.17 2 2
Mendoza Popular Movement (MPM) 97,705 1.09 1 1
Blockist Radical Civic Union (UCR-B) 75,225 0.84 2 2
National Reconstruction Party 50,979 0.57
White Party 46,013 0.51 1 4
Social Justice Party 41,727 0.47
People's Party 40,393 0.45
Las Flores-Luján Line Movement 37,435 0.42
Labour Party (PL) 25,900 0.29 2
Renewal Crusade Radical Civic Union (UCR-CR) 24,431 0.27
Argentine Reconstruction Party (PRAR) 23,646 0.26
San Luis Popular Action 23,297 0.26 1 1
Argentine Popular Action 22,366 0.25
Neuquén People's Movement (MPN) 21,052 0.24 2 2
Provincial Defense - White Flag 12,163 0.14 1
Provincial Party of Santiago del Estero 7,922 0.09
National Independent Party 5,974 0.07
Party of the Liberating Revolution 5,396 0.06
Provincial Party of Chubut 5,125 0.06
Argentine Retirees Union 5,052 0.06
Union Force 3,959 0.04
National Unity Party 3,273 0.04 1 1
Federal Social Movement 2,784 0.03
National Union Party 2,085 0.02
Neighborhood Party 625 0.01
Popular Workers Party 544 0.01
Santa Cruz Popular Movement 415 0.00
Defense of Labour 333 0.00
Democratic Federal Movement Did not run 1
Total 8,954,249 100 99 192
Positive votes 8,954,249 95.77
Blank votes 357,871 3.83
Invalid votes 37,708 0.40
Total votes 9,349,828 100
Registered voters/turnout 11,168,564 83.72
Sources:[4][5]

Results by province

Province Popular Union UCRP Center Parties MID Other Peronists Others
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
Buenos Aires 1,358,651 41.12 14 970,701 29.38 9 180,444 5.46 1 114,884 3.48 1 19,847 0.60 659,293 19.96 1
Buenos Aires City 549,057 33.69 8 552,678 33.91 8 58,876 3.61 54,808 3.36 5,432 0.33 409,009 25.09 2
Chaco 80,930 43.54 2 60,220 32.40 1 7,441 4.00 15,127 8.14 22,138 11.91
Chubut 16,545 33.59 1 17,035 34.59 1 3,608 7.33 5,125 10.41 6,940 14.09
Córdoba 357,544 38.75 5 339,039 36.75 4 69,454 7.53 37,687 4.08 9,007 0.98 109,886 11.91
Corrientes 45,212 18.89 14,308 5.98 156,354 65.32 5 23,507 9.82
Entre Ríos 18,602 4.85 123,369 32.14 2 29,989 7.81 60,117 15.66 1 97,044 25.28 1 54,720 14.26
La Pampa 32,488 40.32 1 17,356 21.54 22,037 27.35 1 8,700 10.80
Mendoza 16,199 4.74 87,666 25.65 1 104,120 30.46 1 9,275 2.71 97,705 28.59 1 26,826 7.85
Neuquén 9,395 23.45 2,968 7.41 21,052 52.55 2 6,649 16.60
Río Negro 20,600 29.84 1 1,966 2.85 4,777 6.92 28,158 40.79 1 13,531 19.60
San Juan 25,643 15.21 28,357 16.82 1 3,215 1.91 2,359 1.40 4,806 2.85 104,183 61.81 2
San Luis 19,700 23.37 8,603 10.21 28,943 34.34 1 23,297 27.64 1 3,752 4.45
Santa Cruz 3,707 25.93 1 2,649 24.03 695 4.86 719 5.03 306 2.14 6,220 43.51 1
Santa Fe 196,794 20.85 2 274,547 29.09 4 12,790 1.35 198,473 21.03 2 30,759 3.26 230,573 24.43 2
Santiago del Estero 36,249 19.82 1 60,492 33.07 1 1,884 1.03 9,157 5.01 51,023 27.90 1 24,091 13.17
Tucumán 28,923 9.21 73,922 23.53 1 4,937 1.57 2,061 0.66 120,160 38.25 2 84,164 26.79
Total 2,786,244 31.12 35 2,660,937 29.72 34 661,108 7.38 8 538,057 6.01 5 513,721 5.74 9 1,794,182 20.04 8

References

  1. ^ El primer peronismo sin Perón (in Spanish)
  2. ^ McGuire, James (1997). Peronism Without Peron: Unions, Parties, and Democracy in Argentina. Stanford University Press. ISBN 9780804736558.
  3. ^ a b Todo Argentina: 1965 (in Spanish)
  4. ^ Cantón, Darío (1968). Materiales para el estudio de la sociología política en la Argentina (PDF). Vol. Tomo I. Buenos Aires: Centro de Investigaciones Sociales - Torcuato di Tella Institute. pp. 239–246.
  5. ^ Nohlen, Dieter (2005). Elections in the Americas: A Data Handbook. Vol. II: South America. Nueva York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-928358-3.
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1965 Argentine legislative election
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