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2019 Argentine general election

2019 Argentine general election

27 October 2019[1]
Opinion polls
Presidential election
← 2015
2023 →
Registered34,231,895
Turnout80.41%
 
Nominee Alberto Fernández Mauricio Macri Roberto Lavagna
Party PJ PRO Independent
Alliance FdT JxC CF
Running mate Cristina Fernández de Kirchner Miguel Ángel Pichetto Juan Manuel Urtubey
Popular vote 12,946,037 10,811,586 1,649,322
Percentage 48.24% 40.28% 6.15%

President before election

Mauricio Macri
JxCPRO

Elected President

Alberto Fernández
FDTPJ

Chamber of Deputies
← 2017
2021 →

130 of the 257 seats in the Chamber of Deputies
Turnout80.37%
Party % Seats
FdT

45.26 64
JxC

40.36 56
CF

5.85 3
HpC

1.47 1
Civic Front for Santiago

1.27 3
FRCS

0.75 1
JSRN

0.47 1
VTVM

0.07 1
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.
Senate
← 2017
2021 →

24 of the 72 seats in the Senate
Turnout78.27%
Party % Seats
FdT

40.16 13
JxC

39.22 8
Civic Front for Santiago

5.83 2
JSRN

2.72 1
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.

General elections were held in Argentina on 27 October 2019, to elect the president of Argentina, members of the national congress and the governors of most provinces.[2]

The Peronist, left-wing Frente de Todos ticket of Alberto Fernández, former Chief Cabinet, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, National Senator and former president, defeated the center-right Juntos por el Cambio ticket of incumbent president Mauricio Macri and conservative Peronist National Senator Miguel Ángel Pichetto, exceeding the threshold to win the presidency in a single round. Macri became the first incumbent president in Argentine history to be defeated in his reelection bid.

Electoral system

The election of the president was conducted under the ballotage system, a modified version of the two-round system. A candidate can win the presidency in a single round by either winning 45% of the vote, or if they win 40% of the vote while finishing 10 percentage points ahead of the second-place candidate. If no candidate meets either threshold, a runoff takes place between the top two candidates.[3] Voting is compulsory for citizens between 18 and 70 years old.[4] Suffrage was also extended to 16- and 17-year-olds, though without compulsory voting.[5]

There are a total of 257 seats of the Chamber of Deputies. They are elected from 24 electoral districts–the 23 provinces, plus the federal district of Buenos Aires, which elects its own executive and legislature and is represented in the national Congress like all other provinces.[6] The number of seats are distributed in relation to the population of the province. One-third of the seats in the Chamber of Deputies are reserved for women. The 130 seats of the Chamber of Deputies up for election were elected from 24 multi-member constituencies based on the 23 provinces and Buenos Aires. Seats were allocated using the D'Hondt method of proportional representation, with an electoral threshold of 3%.[4]

The 24 seats in the Senate up for election were elected in three-seat constituencies using the closed list system. Each district is represented by three senatorial seats. Each party is allowed to register up to two candidates; one of those registered must be female. The party receiving the most votes wins two seats, and the second-placed party wins one.[7] The third senatorial seat was established in the Constitution of 1994 in order to better represent the largest minority in each district.

Congress

Number of deputies at stake in each province.
Provinces that elected senators in blue.

Chamber of Deputies

The 257 members of the Chamber of Deputies are elected by proportional representation in 24 multi-member constituencies based on the provinces (plus the City of Buenos Aires). Seats are allocated using the d'Hondt method with a 3% electoral threshold. In this election, 130 of the 257 seats are up for renewal for a 4-year term.[citation needed]

Province Total
seats
Seats
at stake
Buenos Aires 70 35
Buenos Aires City 25 12
Catamarca 5 2
Chaco 7 3
Chubut 5 3
Córdoba 18 9
Corrientes 7 4
Entre Ríos 9 4
Formosa 5 3
Jujuy 6 3
La Pampa 5 2
La Rioja 5 3
Mendoza 10 5
Misiones 7 4
Neuquén 5 2
Río Negro 5 3
Salta 7 4
San Juan 6 3
San Luis 5 2
Santa Cruz 5 2
Santa Fe 19 10
Santiago del Estero 7 4
Tierra del Fuego 5 3
Tucumán 9 5
Total 257 130

Senate

The 72 members of the Senate are elected in the same 24 constituencies, with three seats in each. The party receiving the most votes in each constituency wins two seats, with the third seat awarded to the second-placed party. The 2019 elections will see one-third of senators renewed, with eight provinces electing three senators for a 6-year term; Buenos Aires City, Chaco, Entre Ríos, Neuquén, Río Negro, Salta, Santiago del Estero and Tierra del Fuego.[citation needed]

Candidates

The following candidates successfully registered their nominations before the limit date of 22 June 2019, and went on to compete in the Open, Simultaneous and Mandatory Primaries (PASO) on 11 August 2019.[8][9]

Presidential candidate
(political party)
Vice-presidential candidate
(political party)
Coalition Coalition parties Presidential candidate prior political offices
Alberto Fernández
(PJ)
Cristina Fernández de Kirchner
(PJ)
Chief of the Cabinet of Ministers (2003–2008)
Mauricio Macri
(PRO)
Miguel Ángel Pichetto
(PJ)
President of Argentina (since 2015)
Chief of Government of Buenos Aires (2007–2015)
Roberto Lavagna
(Independent)
Juan Manuel Urtubey
(PJ)
Minister of Economy and Production (2003–2005)
Nicolás del Caño
(PTS)
Romina Del Plá
(PO)
National Deputy from Buenos Aires (since 2017)
José Luis Espert
(PL)
Luis Rosales
(PL)
None (economist and professor)
Alejandro Biondini
(BV)
Enrique Venturino
(BV)
None (founder and president of Bandera Vecinal)
Manuela Castañeira
(Nuevo MAS)
Eduardo Mulhall
(Nuevo MAS)
None (sociologist)
Juan José Gómez Centurión
(NOS)
Cynthia Hotton
(Valores para mi País)
Vice-president of the Bank of the Argentine Nation (2017–2019)
José Antonio Romero Feris
(PAN)
Guillermo Sueldo
(PAN)
National Senator for Corrientes (1987–2001)
Governor of Corrientes (1983–1987)
Raúl Humberto Albarracín
(Neighbourhood Action Movement)
Sergio Darío Pastore
(Neighbourhood Action Movement)
Provincial legislator of Córdoba (2007–2011)

Opinion polls

Results

Primary elections

Open primary elections for the presidency were held nationwide on 11 August. With this system, all parties run primary elections on a single ballot. All parties must take part in it, both the parties with internal factions and parties with a single candidate list. Citizens may vote for any candidate of any party, but may only cast a single vote. The most voted candidate of parties gaining 1.5% or higher of the valid votes advances to the general election.[10]

Fernández came top with 47.8% of the vote, with Macri trailing behind with 31.8%. Lavagna, del Caño, Gómez Centurión and Espert all received enough valid votes to participate in the general election.[11][12]

CandidateRunning matePartyVotes%
Alberto FernándezCristina Fernández de KirchnerFrente de Todos12,205,93847.79
Mauricio MacriMiguel Ángel PichettoJuntos por el Cambio8,121,68931.80
Roberto LavagnaJuan Manuel UrtubeyFederal Consensus2,081,3158.15
Nicolás del CañoRomina Del PláWorkers' Left Front723,1472.83
Juan José Gómez CenturiónCynthia HottonNOS670,1622.62
José Luis EspertLuis RosalesUnite por la Libertad y la Dignidad550,5932.16
Manuela CastañeiraEduardo MulhallMovimiento al Socialismo179,4610.70
Alejandro BiondiniEnrique VenturinoPatriotic Front58,9440.23
Raúl AlbarracínSergio PastoreNeighbourhood Action Movement36,4110.14
José Antonio FerisGuillermo SueldoAutonomist Party [es]32,7220.13
Blank votes882,6593.46
Total25,543,041100.00
Valid votes25,543,04198.77
Invalid/blank votes318,0091.23
Total votes25,861,050100.00
Registered voters/turnout33,871,83276.35
Source: Padron,[13] DINE[14]

President

Most voted party by winner strength.

Fernández owed his victory mostly to Buenos Aires Province swinging over dramatically to support him; he carried it by over 1.6 million votes over Macri, accounting for almost all of his nationwide margin of 2.1 million votes. By comparison, Daniel Scioli only carried the province by 219,000 votes in 2015.

CandidateRunning matePartyVotes%
Alberto FernándezCristina Fernández de KirchnerFrente de Todos12,946,03748.24
Mauricio MacriMiguel Ángel PichettoJuntos por el Cambio10,811,58640.28
Roberto LavagnaJuan Manuel UrtubeyFederal Consensus1,649,3226.15
Nicolás del CañoRomina Del PláWorkers' Left Front579,2282.16
Juan José Gómez CenturiónCynthia HottonNOS457,9561.71
José Luis EspertLuis RosalesUnite por la Libertad y la Dignidad394,2071.47
Total26,838,336100.00
Valid votes26,838,33697.50
Invalid votes252,3880.92
Blank votes434,3791.58
Total votes27,525,103100.00
Registered voters/turnout34,231,89580.41
Source: Padron,[13] DINE[15]

Results by district

Province Fernández/Kirchner
(FdT)
Macri/Pichetto
(JxC)
Lavagna/Urtubey
(CF)
Del Caño/del Plá
(FIT–U)
G. Centurión/Hotton
(NOS)
Espert/Rosales
(UNITE)
Blanks/Invalid Turnout Margin
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
Buenos Aires 5,294,879 52.20 3,640,552 35.89 638,990 6.30 273,495 2.70 150,067 1.48 145,743 1.43 230,767 2.22 10,374,493 82.19 1,654,327 16.31
Buenos Aires City 719,655 35.46 1,068,134 52.64 130,475 6.43 59,066 2.91 13,863 0.68 38,013 1.87 46,228 2.23 2,075,434 76.85 -348,479 -17.18
Catamarca 132,590 56.66 79,568 34.00 13,197 5.64 3,508 1.50 2,136 0.91 3,011 1.29 24,941 9.63 258,951 81.04 53,022 22.66
Chaco 404,758 55.73 258,432 35.58 27,636 3.81 6,986 0.96 20,617 2.84 7,856 1.08 11,370 1.54 737,655 77.61 146,326 20.15
Chubut 174,726 52.42 97,837 29.35 25,357 7.61 13,117 3.94 14,253 4.28 8,029 2.40 14,289 4.11 347,608 77.78 76,889 23.07
Córdoba 666,445 29.31 1,394,104 61.31 113,734 5.00 37,612 1.65 31,869 1.40 30,213 1.33 68,489 2.93 2,342,466 79.01 -727,659 -32.00
Corrientes 354,968 51.19 290,690 41.92 21,658 3.12 6,522 0.94 12,515 1.80 7,044 1.02 13,427 1.90 706,824 80.75 64,278 9.27
Entre Ríos 390,587 44.37 391,495 44.47 55,030 6.25 14,504 1.65 14,647 1.66 14,111 1.60 14,576 1.63 894,950 80.59 -908 -0.10
Formosa 229,774 65.21 100,280 28.46 11,057 3.14 3,112 0.88 5,334 1.51 2,797 0.79 5,137 1.44 357,491 77.75 129,494 36.75
Jujuy 207,120 46.19 186,104 41.50 26,835 5.98 9,214 2.05 10,512 2.34 8,617 1.92 8,714 1.91 457,116 81.79 21,016 4.69
La Pampa 115,095 50.07 86,744 37.74 15,137 6.59 4,727 2.06 4,676 2.03 3,471 1.51 3,665 1.57 233,515 81.25 28,351 12.33
La Rioja 85,779 47.37 80,462 44.43 7,844 4.33 2,127 1.17 2,087 1.15 2,801 1.55 52,964 22.63 234,064 80.78 5,317 2.94
Mendoza 435,313 37.83 576,493 50.10 75,448 6.56 26,315 2.29 22,715 1.97 14,370 1.25 23,902 2.03 1,174,556 81.10 -141,180 -12.27
Misiones 417,752 57.71 245,254 33.88 24,451 3.38 6,704 0.93 21,239 2.93 8,537 1.18 18,551 2.50 742,488 79.90 172,498 23.83
Neuquén 194,205 47.73 151,939 37.34 25,628 6.30 15,209 3.74 11,743 2.89 8,167 2.01 20,018 4.72 426,909 83.94 42,266 10.39
Río Negro 247,664 57.23 123,674 28.58 27,483 6.35 11,252 2.60 14,173 3.28 8,482 1.96 19,431 4.30 452,159 80.35 123,990 28.65
Salta 374,369 48.82 266,406 34.74 82,358 10.74 13,625 1.78 16,635 2.17 13,378 1.74 17,608 2.24 784,379 76.11 107,963 14.08
San Juan 242,060 53.01 160,449 35.14 33,004 7.23 6,928 1.52 8,388 1.84 5,759 1.26 8,341 1.79 464,929 82.44 81,611 17.87
San Luis 129,118 41.68 139,479 45.03 20,954 6.76 7,171 2.32 7,683 2.48 5,354 1.73 8,076 2.54 317,835 81.53 -10,361 -3.35
Santa Cruz 108,323 59.77 51,183 28.24 9,123 5.03 6,032 3.33 5,171 2.85 1,402 0.77 7,649 4.05 188,883 74.73 57,140 31.53
Santa Fe 920,202 42.68 937,611 43.49 193,603 8.98 30,862 1.43 33,247 1.54 40,353 1.87 43,662 1.99 2,199,540 79.48 -17,409 -0.81
Santiago del Estero 451,082 74.95 110,525 18.37 20,103 3.34 5,755 0.96 9,220 1.53 5,123 0.85 9,924 1.62 611,732 80.45 340,557 56.58
Tierra del Fuego 57,887 56.93 26,529 26.09 7,785 7.66 2,760 2.71 3,925 3.86 2,803 2.76 3,208 3.06 104,897 75.88 31,358 30.84
Tucumán 591,686 57.76 347,642 33.94 42,432 4.14 12,598 1.23 21,241 2.07 8,773 0.86 17,801 1.71 1,042,173 82.84 244,044 23.82
Total 12,946,037 48.24 10,811,586 40.28 1,649,322 6.14 579,228 2.16 457,956 1.71 394,207 1.47 686,767 2.52 27,525,103 80.41 2,134,501 7.96

Chamber of Deputies

Party or allianceVotes%Seats
WonTotal
Frente de Todos11,606,41145.2664112
Juntos por el Cambio10,347,60540.3656119
Federal ConsensusFederal Consensus1,178,6274.6035
Socialist Party90,7190.3502
Union for Salta83,6330.3300
Protector Political Force74,1380.2901
Generation for a National Encounter25,2460.1000
Social Pole Movement22,6360.0900
Freemen of the South Movement18,5850.0700
Authentic Renewal Front6,8580.0300
Total1,500,4425.8538
Workers' Left FrontWorkers' Left Front742,1282.8902
Workers' Socialist Movement19,6710.0800
Workers' Party3,6510.0100
Total765,4502.9902
We Do for Córdoba377,8441.4714
Civic Front for Santiago326,5661.2736
Front for the Renewal of Concord191,8760.7513
Together We Are Río Negro121,4780.4711
Unite por la Libertad y la Dignidad113,8120.4400
NOSRepublican Force55,7130.2200
Conservative People's Party22,0480.0900
Acción Chaqueña [es]21,1730.0800
Citizens to Govern Party12,9760.0500
Total111,9100.4400
Neuquén People's Movement78,3420.3101
Encuentro Vecinal Córdoba [es]44,6420.1700
Self-determination and Freedom24,6850.1000
Let's All Live Better17,9920.0711
Independent Party of Chubut5,1720.0200
Patagonian Social Party4,7270.0200
Partido Es Posible [es]2,1810.0100
Total25,641,135100.00130257
Valid votes25,641,13593.20
Invalid votes274,3221.00
Blank votes1,596,1105.80
Total votes27,511,567100.00
Registered voters/turnout34,231,89580.37
Source: Padron,[13] DINE[15]

Results by province

Province FdT JxC CF Others
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
Buenos Aires 5,113,359 52.64 19 3,668,580 37.77 14 583,699 6.01 2 348,501 3.59
Buenos Aires City 641,054 32.05 4 1,060,404 53.02 8 114,968 5.75 183,665 9.18
Catamarca 133,327 61.32 1 73,578 33.84 1 10,516 4.84
Chaco 397,472 56.70 2 255,528 36.45 1 26,778 3.82 21,173 3.02
Chubut 160,996 53.45 2 97,245 32.29 1 22,636 7.52 20,327 6.75
Córdoba 495,823 22.31 2 1,140,338 51.32 6 79,098 3.56 506,732 22.81 1
Corrientes 336,448 50.98 2 290,463 44.01 2 20,120 3.05 12,976 1.97
Entre Ríos 380,614 45.20 2 384,968 45.72 2 56,786 6.74 19,671 2.34
Formosa 225,608 67.01 2 99,305 29.49 1 11,780 3.50
Jujuy 189,305 45.40 2 180,877 43.38 1 29,030 6.96 17,721 4.25
La Pampa 114,079 51.63 1 87,049 39.40 1 14,627 6.62 5,197 2.35
La Rioja 70,564 52.18 2 60,498 44.73 1 4,179 3.09
Mendoza 423,002 37.99 2 583,897 52.44 3 74,138 6.66 32,343 2.90
Misiones 234,404 34.94 2 225,232 33.58 1 19,306 2.88 191,876 28.60 1
Neuquén 137,285 36.39 1 123,386 32.70 1 17,602 4.67 99,025 26.25
Río Negro 170,935 45.10 2 71,949 18.98 136,107 35.91 1
Salta 328,966 46.68 2 244,225 34.65 2 83,633 11.87 47,920 6.80
San Juan 239,426 54.79 2 167,672 38.37 1 29,867 6.84
San Luis 126,592 43.87 1 134,668 46.67 1 18,622 6.45 8,701 3.02
Santa Cruz 96,658 62.13 2 45,586 29.30 6,858 4.41 6,474 4.16
Santa Fe 890,561 42.26 4 912,407 43.30 5 210,773 10.00 1 93,358 4.43
Santiago del Estero 125,609 21.88 1 103,411 18.01 18,585 3.24 326,566 56.88 3
Tierra del Fuego 33,878 38.67 1 20,747 23.68 1 6,624 7.56 26,370 30.10 1
Tucumán 540,446 55.25 3 315,592 32.26 2 44,396 4.54 77,795 7.95
Total 11,606,411 45.26 64 10,347,605 40.36 56 1,500,442 5.85 3 2,186,677 8.53 7

Senate

Party or allianceVotes%Seats
WonTotal
Frente de Todos2,263,22140.161339
Juntos por el Cambio2,210,31039.22828
Federal ConsensusFederal Consensus159,2712.8300
Union for Salta85,6011.5200
Socialist Party56,6061.0000
Freemen of the South Movement18,3440.3300
Generation for a National Encounter8,1440.1400
Total327,9665.8200
Workers' Left FrontWorkers' Left Front140,7922.5000
Workers' Socialist Movement18,7180.3300
Workers' Party2,8150.0500
Total162,3252.8800
Civic Front for Santiago328,6275.8322
Together We Are Río Negro153,3382.7211
Neuquén People's Movement85,6171.5200
NOSConservative People's Party22,3050.4000
Acción Chaqueña [es]21,1910.3800
Total43,4960.7700
Unite por la Libertad y la Dignidad38,9700.6900
Let's All Live Better17,2100.3100
Patagonian Social Party4,8260.0900
Federal Peronism01
Front for the Renewal of Concord01
Total5,635,906100.002472
Valid votes5,635,90692.64
Invalid votes64,4631.06
Blank votes383,0316.30
Total votes6,083,400100.00
Registered voters/turnout7,772,50078.27
Source: Padron,[13] DINE[15]

Results by province

Province FdT JxC CF Others
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
Buenos Aires City 679,569 34.08 1 1,076,452 53.99 2 114,907 5.76 122,892 6.16
Chaco 400,188 56.98 2 254,215 36.19 1 26,766 3.81 21,191 3.02
Entre Ríos 383,238 45.47 1 384,300 45.59 2 56,606 6.72 18,718 2.22
Neuquén 136,350 35.66 2 123,490 32.30 1 17,598 4.60 104,936 27.44
Río Negro 169,726 50.38 2 167,181 49.62 1
Salta 330,324 46.55 2 247,699 34.91 1 85,601 12.06 46,013 6.48
Santiago del Estero 126,413 21.91 1 103,581 17.95 18,344 3.18 328,627 56.96 2
Tierra del Fuego 37,413 41.12 2 20,573 22.61 1 8,144 8.95 24,851 27.31
Total 2,263,221 40.16 13 2,210,310 39.22 8 327,966 5.82 0 834,409 14.81 3

Provincial elections

Date District Offices Winner Runner-up
10 March Neuquén Governor

Vice Governor

35 provincial deputies

Omar Gutiérrez - Marcos Koopmann

(Neuquén People's Movement)

(40,19 %)

Ramón Rioseco - Darío Martínez

(Neuquin Front–Citizens' Unity)

(25,93 %)

7 April Río Negro Governor

Vice Governor

46 provincial deputies

Arabela Carreras - Alejandro Palmieri

(Together We Are Río Negro)

(52,63 %)

Martín Soria - Magdalena Odarda

(Front for Victory)

(34,97 %)

12 May Córdoba Governor

Vice Governor

70 provincial deputies

Juan Schiaretti - Manuel Calvo

(We Do for Córdoba)

(57,38 %)

Mario Negri - Héctor Baldassi

(Córdoba Changes)

(18,85 %)

19 May La Pampa Governor

Vice Governor

30 provincial deputies

Sergio Ziliotto - Mariano Fernández

(La Pampa Justicialist Front)

(52,68 %)

Daniel Kroneberger - Luis Evangelista

(Cambiemos La Pampa)

(31,80 %)

2 June Misiones Governor

Vice Governor

20 provincial deputies

Oscar Herrera Ahuad - Carlos Omar Arce

(Front for the Renewal of Concord)

(72,81 %)

Humberto Schiavoni - Luis Mario Pastori

(Together for Change)

(17,59 %)

San Juan Governor

Vice Governor

36 provincial deputies

Sergio Uñac - Roberto Gattoni

(Everyone Front)

(55,84 %)

Marcelo Orrego - Susana Laciar

(Front with You)

(33,91 %)

9 June Chubut Governor

Vice Governor

27 provincial deputies

Mariano Arcioni - Ricardo Sastre

(Chubut Ahead)

(41,35 %)

Carlos Linares - Claudia Bard

(Chubut Patriotic Front)

(33,97 %)

Entre Ríos Governor

Vice Governor

34 provincial deputies

17 provincial senators

Gustavo Bordet - María Laura Stratta

(Believe Entre Ríos)

(57,43 %)

Atilio Benedetti - Gustavo Hein

(Cambiemos)

(35,57 %)

Jujuy Governor

Vice Governor

24 provincial deputies

Gerardo Morales - Carlos Haquim

(Change Jujuy)

(43,76 %)

Julio Ferreyra - Adrián Mendieta

(Justicialist Front)

(32,77 %)

Tucumán Governor

Vice Governor

49 provincial deputies

Juan Luis Manzur - Osvaldo Jaldo

(Justicialist Front for Tucumán)

(51,86 %)

Silvia Elías de Pérez - José Manuel Paz

(Let's Go Tucumán)

(20,41 %)

16 June Formosa Governor

Vice Governor

15 provincial deputies

Gildo Insfrán - Eber Wilson Solís

(Justicialist Party)

(70,66 %)

Adrián Bogado - Iván Nicolás Kaluk

(Formosan Broad Front)

(28,89 %)

San Luis Governor

Vice Governor

21 provincial deputies

5 provincial senators

Alberto Rodríguez Saá - Eduardo Mones Ruiz

(Justicialist Unity)

(42,34 %)

Claudio Poggi - Enrique Ariel Ponce

(United San Luis)

(34,54 %)

Santa Fe Governor

Vice Governor

50 provincial deputies

19 provincial senators

Omar Perotti - Alejandra Rodenas

(Together Front)

(42,31 %)

Antonio Bonfatti - María Victoria Tejeda

(Progressive, Civic and Social Front)

(37,91 %)

Tierra del Fuego Governor

Vice Governor

15 provincial deputies

Gustavo Melella - Mónica Urquiza

(FORJA)

(55,03 %)

Rosana Bertone - Juan Carlos Arcando

(Fueguin Unity)

(40,86 %)

11 August Santa Cruz Governor

Vice Governor

24 provincial deputies

Alicia Kirchner - Eugenio Quiroga

(Santacruzean Accord)

(58,59%)

Eduardo Costa - Liliana Andrade

(To get out ahead)

(32,03%)

29 September Mendoza Governor

Vice Governor

24 provincial deputies

19 provincial senators

Rodolfo Suárez - Mario Abed

(Change Mendoza)

(51,63%)

Anabel Fernández Sagasti - Jorge Tanus

(Choose Mendoza)

(36,21%)

13 October Chaco Governor

Vice Governor

16 provincial deputies

Jorge Capitanich - Analía Rach Quiroga

(Chaqueño Front)

(49,32%)

Carim Peche - Roy Nikisch

(We Are All Chaco)

(31,40%)

27 October Buenos Aires

(in detail)

Governor

Vice Governor

46 provincial deputies

23 provincial senators

Axel Kicillof - Verónica Magario

(Everyone's Front)

(52,28%)

María Eugenia Vidal - Daniel Salvador

(Together for Change)

(38,39%)

Catamarca Governor

Vice Governor

20 provincial deputies

8 provincial senators

Raúl Jalil - Rubén Dusso

(Everyone's Front)

(60,40%)

Roberto Gómez - Lía Quiroga

(Together for Change)

(33,46%)

Buenos Aires City Chief of Government

Vice Chief of Government

30 legislators

Horacio Rodríguez Larreta - Diego Santilli

(Together for Change)

(55,90%)

Matías Lammens - Gisela Marziotta

(Everyone's Front)

(35,06%)

La Rioja Governor

Vice Governor

18 provincial deputies

Ricardo Quintela - Florencia López

(Everyone's Front)

(40,84%)

Julio Martínez - Teresita Luna

(Together for La Rioja)

(27,90%)

10 November Salta Governor

Vice Governor

30 provincial deputies

11 provincial senators

Gustavo Sáenz - Antonio Marocco

(Sáenz Governor Front)

(53,85%)

Sergio Leavy - Emiliano Estrada

(Everyone's Front)

(26,00%)

References

  1. ^ "Calendario electoral 2019: las fechas del cronograma, provincia por provincia". La Nación (in Spanish). Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  2. ^ "Reuters TV - Live". Reuters TV. Archived from the original on October 28, 2019. Retrieved Oct 29, 2019.
  3. ^ David Hodari (23 October 2015). "Argentina elections 2015: a guide to the parties, polls and electoral system". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  4. ^ a b Chamber of Deputies: Electoral system Archived 31 October 2013 at the Wayback Machine IPU
  5. ^ Voto de los Jóvenes de 16 y 17 años0 Archived 2017-03-30 at the Wayback Machine Camara Nacional Electoral
  6. ^ Regúnaga, Carlos (22 October 2007). "CSIS Hemisphere Focus" (PDF). The Argentine Elections: Systems and Candidates. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 May 2015. Retrieved 22 April 2016.
  7. ^ Argentine Republic: Election for Senado (Senate) IFES
  8. ^ "Cierre de listas electorales: todos los candidatos para las elecciones 2019". La Nación (in Spanish). Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  9. ^ "Mirá las boletas de los principales candidatos en Argentina". Infobae (in Spanish). 23 June 2019. Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  10. ^ "Qué son las PASO". Infobae (in Spanish). 9 April 2019. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  11. ^ González, Enric (12 August 2019). "Victoria abrumadora del peronismo en las primarias argentinas". El País (in Spanish). Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  12. ^ "PASO 2019: Los resultados de las elecciones en todo el país". Clarín (in Spanish). 12 August 2019. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  13. ^ a b c d "Consulta de Escrutinios Definitivos". www.padron.gob.ar.
  14. ^ "ACORDADA EXTRAORDINARIA NÚMERO SESENTA Y UNO" (PDF). Cámara Nacional Electoral. 3 September 2019.
  15. ^ a b c "Dirección Nacional Electoral - Elecciones 2019". www.argentina.gob.ar.
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2019 Argentine general election
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