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2005 Argentine legislative election

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2005 Argentine legislative election
Argentina
← 2003 23 October 2005 2007 →

127 of 257 seats in the Chamber of Deputies
24 of 72 seats in the Senate
Turnout73.33% (Deputies)
76.41% (Senate)
Party % Seats +/–
Chamber of Deputies
Front for Victory

39.46% 63 −5
Radical Civic Union

10.17% 14 −3
Federal Peronism

8.09% 12 +11
Support for an Egalitarian Republic

8.00% 9 −1
Republican Proposal Alliance

7.44% 10 +6
Socialist Party - Radical Civic Union

5.18% 7 0
Federalist Unity Party

2.29% 2 −1
New Front

2.02% 3 0
Front of Everyone (Corrientes)

1.63% 3 0
Salta Renewal Party

0.58% 1 0
Neuquén People's Movement

0.50% 2 0
Civic Front for Victory

0.36% 1 0
Senate
Front for Victory

47.70% 16 +3
Federal Peronism

17.44% 5 +5
Radical Civic Union

8.13% 3 −3
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.

Argentina held national parliamentary elections on Sunday, 23 October 2005. For the purpose of these elections, each of the 23 provinces and the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires are considered electoral districts.

Each district elected a number of members of the Lower House (the Argentine Chamber of Deputies) roughly proportional to their population. Eight districts (Buenos Aires, Formosa, Jujuy, La Rioja, Misiones, San Juan, San Luis, and Santa Cruz) also elected members to the Upper House of Congress (the Argentine Senate); as usual, three senators were elected (two for the majority, one for the first minority).

In most provinces, the national elections were conducted in parallel with local ones, whereby a number of municipalities elected legislative officials (concejales) and in some cases also a mayor (or the equivalent executive post). Each provincial election followed local regulations.

A number of districts had held primary elections beforehand. In most cases, primary elections are optional and can be called for by the local political parties as needed; in Santa Fe, however, the primaries were universal and compulsory due to a recent law that repealed the much-criticized Ley de Lemas.

Background

The main parties and coalitions competing in these elections were:

In some districts, different factions of the Justicialist Party (PJ) presented candidates separately. In Buenos Aires Province and the city of Buenos Aires, the main intra-party division of the PJ was between the center-right, traditional Peronist faction led by Hilda González de Duhalde (wife of former governor and interim president Eduardo Duhalde), and the more center-left "heterodox" faction with candidates that answer to President Néstor Kirchner. These included his own wife, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, and Minister of Foreign Relations, Rafael Bielsa. In the Province of Buenos Aires, this split was protested by other parties, on the grounds that the PJ (taken as a whole) would most likely win the three senatorial benches available (as it finally occurred).

Kirchner took a prominent role in the campaign for "his" candidates of the Front for Victory (Frente para la Victoria, FV) in most provinces, explicitly stating that these elections were a referendum on his administration. Kirchner also campaigned against former President Carlos Menem, a leading conservative Peronist, in La Rioja Province, where the latter was ultimately elected to the Senate for the third (minority party) seat. The opening and closing campaign meetings of the FV were both held in Rosario, a typically progressive city that, since 1987, had been governed successfully by a Socialist local government. This party changed the traditional electoral paradigm in the Province of Santa Fe, largely displacing Peronism and the UCR in that district.

Results

President Néstor Kirchner (left) confers with Buenos Aires Province Governor Felipe Solá. Their opposition to powerbroker Eduardo Duhalde dominated the 2005 races.

Buoyed by a strong recovery in the Argentine economy, candidates endorsed by Kirchner (mainly on the Front for Victory ticket) obtained an overwhelming triumph. Of the 127 deputies elected, the FV won 69 seats (54%); the UCR only got 19. The rest of the Justicialist Party obtained 11 seats; Recrear got 9, the ARI got 8, and the Socialist Party got 5. Only the three most voted in this list have an established national structure; Recrear and the ARI are relatively recent offshoots of the UCR (to the right- and left-wing side of the political spectrum, respectively), and the Socialist Party's five deputies all belong to the province of Santa Fe, the only district where the PS is strong.

As explained above, eight provinces were also scheduled to renew their senators (the Senate is renewed by thirds every two years). The Front for Victory won 17 of the 24 senatorial seats. The other factions of Peronism got 4 senators. The UCR got the remaining 3 seats. Among the remarkable results were the victory of First Lady Cristina Fernández de Kirchner in Buenos Aires, the largest in the country, beating former First Lady Hilda González de Duhalde by about 25% of the votes; and the defeat of Carlos Menem in his home district, La Rioja (though he won the first minority seat).

Chamber of Deputies

Party Votes % Seats won Total seats
Front for Victory (FPV) 6,806,891 39.46 63 113
Radical Civic Union (UCR) 1,753,576 10.17 14 39
Federal Peronism 1,395,014 8.09 12 38
Support for an Egalitarian Republic (ARI) 1,380,330 8.00 9 19
Republican Proposal Alliance (PRO) 1,282,503 7.44 10 14
Socialist Party (PS) - Radical Civic Union (UCR) 893,115 5.18 7 [a]
Federalist Unity Party (PAUFE) 395,102 2.29 2 5
United Left (IU) 366,259 2.12
New Front 349,112 2.02 3 6
Front of Everyone (Corrientes) (PJ + UCR) 281,077 1.63 3 [b]
Humanist Party (PH) 233,889 1.36
Workers' Party (PO) 224,868 1.30
Socialist Party (PS) 144,734 0.84 7
Neighborhood Confederation 134,531 0.78
Salta Renewal Party (PRS) 100,686 0.58 1 2
Neuquén People's Movement (MPN) 86,610 0.50 2 4
Movement for Socialism (MAS) - Socialist Workers' Party (PTS) 78,320 0.45
Self-determination and Freedom (AyL) 63,320 0.37 2
Civic Front for Victory (PJ + UCR) 62,262 0.36 1 [c]
Front for Justice and Social Progress 61,803 0.36
Authentic Socialist Party (PSA) 60,992 0.35
United for Corrientes Front 60,642 0.35 1
People's Reconstruction Party (PPR) 54,430 0.32
United People's Front 50,302 0.29
Democratic Progressive Party (PDP) 48,731 0.28
People First - Neighborhood Union of Córdoba 46,277 0.27
Republican Force (FR) 40,982 0.24 2
Anticorruption Front 40,922 0.24
Union for Everyone 40,630 0.24
Everyone - Political Movement for the Defense of Civil and Social Rights 36,536 0.21
Christian Democratic Party (PDC) 34,234 0.20
Center Federal Movement 33,713 0.20
Integration and Development Movement (MID) 32,030 0.19
Popular Union 30,405 0.18
Intransigent Party (PI) 28,528 0.17
Open Policy for Social Integrity (PAIS) 28,405 0.16
Chubut Action Party (PACH) 26,773 0.16
Popular Action Movement 26,002 0.15
Unity and Liberty Party (PUL) 24,224 0.14
Corrientes Project 23,907 0.14 1
Socialist Convergence 22,095 0.13
Provincial Neighborhood Movement 20,737 0.12
Blocist Unity 19,866 0.12
Movement for Dignity and Independence (MODIN) 19,448 0.11
Independent Movement of Retirees and Unemployed (MIJD) 19,025 0.11
Popular Loyalty 16,897 0.10
Federal Democratic Alliance 13,991 0.08
Front Party 13,944 0.08
Authentic Popular Front 11,542 0.07 4
Front for the New Majority 11,069 0.06
Freedom and Responsible Democracy 10,979 0.06
Río Negro Provincial Party (PPR) 10,675 0.06
Fueguian People's Movement (MOPOF) 9,447 0.05
Porteña Hope 9,269 0.05
Santiado del Estero Crusade 9,224 0.05
Constitutional Nationalist Party (PNC) 8,751 0.05
Party for Independent Solidarity Action in Buenos Aires 8,742 0.05
Network for Buenos Aires 8,548 0.05
Citizen Dignity 7,367 0.04
Popular Sovereignty Front 7,069 0.04
Together for Mendoza 6,954 0.04
San Luis Front of Victory 6,818 0.04
Front of Self-Convened Political Groups 6,656 0.04
Service and Community 6,479 0.04
Independent Citizens 6,218 0.04
Front Unity for Change 5,810 0.03
Retirees in Action 5,700 0.03
Salta Popular Movement 5,153 0.03
Popular Unity Movement 4,950 0.03
May 25 Party 4,508 0.03
Republican Union 3,895 0.02
Popular Unity 3,727 0.02
Citizen Action 3,386 0.02
People's Assemblies Party 3,361 0.02
New Generation 3,361 0.02
Autonomist Party 3,344 0.02
Emancipatory Front 3,140 0.02
Popular Participation Party 3,107 0.02
Public Call 2,885 0.02
Free in Motion 2,700 0.02
New Leadership 2,489 0.01
Open Space 2,193 0.01
Fuegian Federal Party 1,993 0.01
United Neighbors 1,949 0.01
Provincial Defense - White Flag 1,569 0.01
Third Millennium 1,542 0.01
Independent Party of Chubut 1,392 0.01
Independence Party 1,386 0.01
Transformative Action 1,382 0.01
Middle Generation Party 1,359 0.01
Autonomous Power 1,261 0.01
Provincial Action 975 0.01
Conservative People's Party (PCP) 877 0.01
New Party of Buenos Aires 792 0.00
Federal Renewal Party 597 0.00
Citizen Integration Call 557 0.00
Total 17,248,192 100 127 257
Positive votes 17,248,192 89.98
Blank votes 1,466,367 7.65
Invalid votes 454,007 2.37
Total votes 19,168,566 100
Registered voters/turnout 26,140,766 73.33

Senate

Party Votes % Seats won Total seats
Front for Victory (FPV) 3,938,766 47.70 16 41
Federal Peronism 1,611,214 17.44 5 5
Radical Civic Union (UCR) 751,112 8.13 3 18
Support for an Egalitarian Republic (ARI) 575,263 6.23
Republican Proposal Alliance (PRO) 509,756 5.52
United Left (IU) 188,782 2.04
Neighborhood Confederation 137,634 1.49
Humanist Party (PH) 116,314 1.26
Workers' Party (PO) 108,420 1.17
Movement for Socialism (MAS) - Socialist Workers' Party (PTS) 42,619 0.46
Socialist Party (PS) 38,468 0.42 1
Popular Action Movement 29,785 0.32
People's Reconstruction Party (PPR) 27,820 0.30
Blocist Unity 22,243 0.24
Socialist Convergence 21,860 0.24
Popular Front 20,418 0.22
Independent Movement of Retirees and Unemployed (MIJD) 18,595 0.20
Integration and Development Movement (MID) 14,196 0.15
Front for the New Majority 12,587 0.14
Authentic Popular Front 11,445 0.12
Freedom and Responsible Democracy 10,854 0.12
Party for Independent Solidarity Action in Buenos Aires 8,743 0.09
Citizen Dignity 8,637 0.09
San Luis Front of Victory 7,276 0.08
Unity for Change Front 5,877 0.06
May 25 Party 4,932 0.05
Popular Unity 3,191 0.03
Free in Motion 2,706 0.03
New Leadership 2,467 0.03
New Generation 2,362 0.03
Unity and Liberty Party (PUL) 1,924 0.02
Movement for Dignity and Independence (MODIN) 666 0.01
Neuquén People's Movement (MPN) did not run 2
Republican Force (FR) did not run 2
Salta Renewal Party (PRS) did not run 1
New Party (PANU) did not run 1
New Front did not run 1
Total 8,256,932 100 24 72
Positive votes 8,256,932 89.40
Blank votes 828,944 8.98
Invalid votes 150,189 1.63
Total votes 9,236,065 100
Registered voters/turnout 12,088,122 76.41

Notes

References

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2005 Argentine legislative election
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