For faster navigation, this Iframe is preloading the Wikiwand page for Anion hydrure.

Anion hydrure

Anion hydrure
Image illustrative de l’article Anion hydrure
Représentation schématique de l'ion.
Identification
Nom UICPA Hydrure[1]
Synonymes

Anion hydrogène, ion hydrogène négatif

No CAS
ChEBI 29239
SMILES
InChI
Propriétés chimiques
Formule H  [Isomères]H
Masse molaire[2] 1,007 94 ± 7,0E−5 g/mol
H 100 %,

Unités du SI et CNTP, sauf indication contraire.

L'anion hydrure (hydride en anglais) ou anion hydrogène désigne l'ion négatif de l'hydrogène, noté H et consiste donc en l'ensemble d'un noyau atomique d'hydrogène (hydron) et de deux électrons. 1H est l'anion proture[3], 2H est l'anion deutérure[4] et 3H est l'anion tritiure[5].

Chimie

Il forme de nombreux sels en particulier avec les métaux les plus électropositifs et aussi différents réactifs comme NaBH4 ou LiAlH4 qui se servent de réducteurs en chimie organique.

Astronomie

L'anion hydrure est un constituant de l'atmosphère du Soleil et probablement des étoiles de type tardif. Bien que peu abondant par rapport à l'hydrogène ionisé H+, c'est le principal contributeur à l'opacité de la photosphère dans le domaine visible[6]. L'ion hydrure est aussi présent dans le milieu interstellaire et est un absorbeur important de photons entre 0,5 et 4,0 eV. Il absorbe donc des rayonnements électromagnétiques inclus dans le domaine infrarouge et le domaine visible. Il est également présent sur Terre, dans l'ionosphère.

Production

Voir aussi

Notes et références

  1. « Hydride - PubChem Public Chemical Database », The PubChem Project, USA, National Center for Biotechnology Information
  2. Masse molaire calculée d’après « Atomic weights of the elements 2007 », sur www.chem.qmul.ac.uk.
  3. (en) « protium », IUPAC, Compendium of Chemical Terminology [« Gold Book »], Oxford, Blackwell Scientific Publications, 1997, version corrigée en ligne :  (2019-), 2e éd. (ISBN 0-9678550-9-8)
  4. (en) « deuterium », IUPAC, Compendium of Chemical Terminology [« Gold Book »], Oxford, Blackwell Scientific Publications, 1997, version corrigée en ligne :  (2019-), 2e éd. (ISBN 0-9678550-9-8)
  5. (en) « tritium », IUPAC, Compendium of Chemical Terminology [« Gold Book »], Oxford, Blackwell Scientific Publications, 1997, version corrigée en ligne :  (2019-), 2e éd. (ISBN 0-9678550-9-8)
  6. (en) Teresa Ross, Emily J. Baker, Theodore P. Snow, Joshua D. Destree, Brian L. Rachford, Meredith M. Drosback et Adam G. Jensen, « The Search for H− in Astrophysical Environments », The Astrophysical Journal, vol. 684, no 1,‎ , p. 358 (ISSN 0004-637X, DOI 10.1086/590242, lire en ligne, consulté le ).
{{bottomLinkPreText}} {{bottomLinkText}}
Anion hydrure
Listen to this article

This browser is not supported by Wikiwand :(
Wikiwand requires a browser with modern capabilities in order to provide you with the best reading experience.
Please download and use one of the following browsers:

This article was just edited, click to reload
This article has been deleted on Wikipedia (Why?)

Back to homepage

Please click Add in the dialog above
Please click Allow in the top-left corner,
then click Install Now in the dialog
Please click Open in the download dialog,
then click Install
Please click the "Downloads" icon in the Safari toolbar, open the first download in the list,
then click Install
{{::$root.activation.text}}

Install Wikiwand

Install on Chrome Install on Firefox
Don't forget to rate us

Tell your friends about Wikiwand!

Gmail Facebook Twitter Link

Enjoying Wikiwand?

Tell your friends and spread the love:
Share on Gmail Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Buffer

Our magic isn't perfect

You can help our automatic cover photo selection by reporting an unsuitable photo.

This photo is visually disturbing This photo is not a good choice

Thank you for helping!


Your input will affect cover photo selection, along with input from other users.

X

Get ready for Wikiwand 2.0 🎉! the new version arrives on September 1st! Don't want to wait?