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Princeton, British Columbia

Princeton
Town of Princeton
Princeton is located in British Columbia
Princeton
Princeton
Location of Princeton in British Columbia
Coordinates: 49°27′36″N 120°30′28″W / 49.46000°N 120.50778°W / 49.46000; -120.50778
CountryCanada
ProvinceBritish Columbia
RegionSimilkameen Country
Regional districtOkanagan-Similkameen
Founded1858
Incorporated (village)1951
Incorporated (town)1978
Government
 • Governing bodyTown Council
 • MayorSpencer Coyne
Area
 • Total59.28 km2 (22.89 sq mi)
Elevation650 m (2,130 ft)
Population
 (2021)
 • Total2,894
 • Density49/km2 (130/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-8 (PST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
Postal code
V0X 1W0 & V0X 2W0
Area codes250, 778, 236, & 672
Highways Hwy 3
Hwy 5A
WaterwaysTulameen River
Similkameen River
WebsiteOfficial website

Princeton is a town municipality in the Similkameen area of southern British Columbia, Canada.[2] The former mining and railway hub lies at the confluence of the Tulameen into the Similkameen River, just east of the Cascade Mountains. It is at the junction of BC Highway 3 and 5A.

Earlier community

Arriving in 1860 during the Similkameen Gold Rush, John Fall Allison pre-empted 65 hectares (160 acres) of farmland immediately northeast of the river fork.[3] The Marston family, who had pre-empted the present townsite, left in 1871.[4] About 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) downstream from the fork, the settlement of Prince Town was laid out on the hillside, but was soon abandoned.[5] The name honoured the Prince of Wales, the future Edward VII, who made a royal visit to Eastern Canada in 1860. The revised spelling as Princeton was quickly adopted for settlement in the general area.[6]

During 1860–1870, Princeton was the administrative centre for the Similkameen District.[7] In 1868, John's second marriage was to Susan Louisa Moir.[8][9] In the 1870s, the fork was a cattle centre from which herds were driven over the mountain trail to Hope.[10] In 1888, John became the inaugural postmaster.[11] In 1897, he died.[12]

In the 1880s, Ah Tuck ran a log cabin Chinese boarding house. In 1897, James Wallace opened[13] the large two-storey hotel called Wallace House, which fire destroyed in 1911.[14] In 1899, John Henry Jackson completed the two-and-a-half-storey log hotel called Jackson House. On selling and enlarging in 1906, it was renamed the Great Northern Hotel but burned down in 1912.[15]

By 1900, the town included a restaurant, two hotels, two livery stables, two butcher shops, two blacksmith shops, two laundries, three sawmills, and government buildings.[16] That year, a newspaper was launched, and the Allison townsite was laid out in the vicinity of the earlier Prince Town[17] (now encompassed by the Weyerhaeuser sawmill property). In partnership with Edgar Dewdney, the Allison family in due course promoted a rival townsite called Norman about 8 kilometres (5 mi) farther downriver. This venture proved unprofitable.[12]

The three-storey, 20-room Tulameen Hotel was completed in 1902, but burned to the ground in 1904. The rebuild was in 1906[14] and demolition in 1960.[15] The Similkameen Hotel was built in 1911 but burned down in 1930.[18] Fires at the 40-room Princeton Hotel, which opened in 1912,[19] caused severe damage in 1930[20] and complete destruction in 2006.[21]

Princeton was incorporated as a village municipality in 1951 and as a town municipality in 1978.[22]

In the 1980s, a downtown revitalization began, which included red brick sidewalks and new streetlights. In the 1990s, Princeton adopted a "heritage" theme, with many businesses converting their exteriors to match architectural styles from a century earlier.[23]

Industry

The British Columbia Copper Mining Co was formed in 1883 to acquire the mineral claims on Copper Mountain.[24]

Castle ruins, Princeton, 2008

The town of Princeton relies heavily on the copper mining industry. The copper ore was originally found in 1883 and the first underground pit was opened in 1923 and continued running until 1957. Surface mining started at the mine back in 1979 and was later shut down in 1996. copper Mountain Mine Corporation bought the mine in 2006 and started running operations in 2011. The mine is still called Copper Mountain Mine however it is now owned by Hudbay Minerals. This mine has generated income and jobs for Princeton locals and has become a tourist attraction for people across North America due to it being one of the largest copper mines in Canada.

Exploratory coal mining began in 1898.[25]

The Princeton Brewing Co, which was founded in 1902, closed after the 1961 sale to the Molson Brewery group.[26]

After investing $1 million in infrastructure, The British Columbia Portland Cement Company plant opened about 3 kilometres (2 mi) northeast in 1913 but closed weeks later.[27] The ruins are part of the Rainbow Lake Castle Resort.[28]

In 1910, a community water supply system was established. The providers of town electricity were Princeton Coal and Land 1911–1914 and then the copper mining company from 1915, running a line from the defunct cement plant. In 1917, West Kootenay Power agreed to extend a line from Bonnington Falls dam. In 1922, the Princeton Light and Power Co became the distributor.[29]

Although forestry and mining have been the dominant industries since that time,[30] tourism and agriculture developed in the latter half of the century,[31] and pharmaceutical cannabis production emerged around 2020.[32]

Education and health

Princeton is part of School District 58 Nicola-Similkameen, and has two elementary schools (John Allison for grades K–3 and Vermilion Forks for grades 4–7), and Princeton Secondary School (for grades 8–12), which includes The Bridge (for adult learners who have not completed high school).[33]

Interior Health provides level 1 health care at the Princeton General Hospital. The 6-bed acute care unit is complemented by a 36-bed extended care unit (Ridgewood Lodge).[31]

Eastward view of former railway bridge and tunnel, Princeton, 2010

The town also has a diabetes clinic, a mental health drop-in centre, and various counseling services to address needs such as balanced nutrition and substance abuse.[34]

Railways

The Great Northern Railway (GN) owned the Vancouver, Victoria and Eastern Railway (VV&E). In November 1909, the northwestward advance of the VV&E rail head crossed the falsework of the Similkameen rail bridge and entered Princeton.[35] In July 1911, tracklaying continued westward through the tunnel excavated beneath Bromley Ridge.[36]

The Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) owned the Kettle Valley Railway (KV). In April 1915, the westward extension of the KV rail head crossed the Tulameen River and joined the GN track in Princeton.[37]

In October 1920, the CP branch from Princeton to Copper Mountain was completed.[38]

GN Train Timetables (Regular stop or Flag stop)
Mile 1909 1913 1914 1916 1922 1925 1928 1931 1933 1934
[39] [40] [41] [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] [47] [39] [48]
Princeton 79.7 Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular
Allison 77.2 Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag
Norman 72.5 Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag
Bromley 67.7 Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag
Cory 60.3 Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag
Hedley 55.7 Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular
CP Train Timetables (Regular stop or Flag stop)
Mile 1915 1916 1919 1924 1929 1932 1935 1939 1943 1948 1954 1960 1963
[49] [50] [51] [52] [53] [54] [49] [55] [56] [57] [58] [59] [60] [61]
Manning 352.5 Regular Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag
Tulameen 346.0 Regular Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Regular Both Both Flag Flag
Coalmont 341.9 Regular Regular Both Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Both Both Flag Flag
Princeton 330.4 Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular Regular
Belfort 325.1 Regular Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag
Jura 320.1 Regular Both Regular Regular Both Both Both Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag
Erris 313.1 Regular Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag

When the GN bridge washed out in April 1934, GN service into Princeton ended permanently.[62]

When the mine ceased operating in 1957, the CP Copper Mountain branch closed and the track was lifted that summer.[63]

Passenger service ended in January 1964.[64] The final freight train passed through in May 1989 and by the end of the summer 1991 all track had been lifted.[65]

The former GN/CP train station (1909) has been clad with siding to become a Subway restaurant.[66] The former CP right-of-way is part of the Kettle Valley Rail Trail.[67]

Ferries and road/pedestrian bridges

Bridge St. southward, Princeton, 1911

Prior to 1949, the main thoroughfare was via the Merritt area. A bridge over the Tulameen (originally called the North Fork of the Similkameen) was washed out during the 1870s. Subsequently, First Nations provided an informal canoe service, but users demanded a government bridge because the ferry charges were considered exorbitant.[68] In 1885, a two-truss-span bridge was erected.[69]

In May 1900, a ferry was installed across the Similkameen to facilitate bridge construction.[70] In March 1901, this Howe truss at the south end of Bridge St was completed,[71] but an ice floe damaged the middle pier and shattered the southern abutment of the Tulameen bridge.[72] At the time, C.O. French had been operating an aerial ferry over the Similkameen about 3 kilometres (2 mi) upstream.[73] That August, the Tulameen bridge was completely rebuilt as a Howe truss.[74]

Brown Bridge, Princeton, 2008

In 1918, a two-span Howe truss was built alongside the Similkameen bridge,[75] and the former bridge was demolished the following year.[76]

Built in the 1930s, the replacement single-lane wooden Tulameen crossing is known as the Brown Bridge. In 2018, a semi-trailer caused structural damages to the bridge, one of many such incidents.[77]

The steel truss, which replaced the Similkameen bridge in 1948, was replaced by a concrete-decked span in 2003.[26][78]

In 1964, the present steel highway bridge over the Tulameen opened.[79][80]

In 2009, the award-winning Bridge of Dreams was built upon the substructure of the 1909 KV bridge.[81]

Road and air transport

Princeton Museum, 2008

By 1899, the stage journey from Spences Bridge took three and a half days.[29] Two operators provided a weekly stage on the route.[82]

In 1901, the Princeton–Hedley–Keremeos road was built, the initial section being the Old Hedley Rd.[83]

In 1920, a Merritt–Princeton auto stage commenced.[84] In 1928, the road to Merritt was upgraded to highway status.[85] Coalmont Road, which had formed the southern end, was replaced by the present section via Allison Lake.[86]

With the highway upon the abandoned VV&E right-of-way along the south bank superseding the Princeton-Stemwinder section of the Old Hedley Rd,[62] paving was tendered in May 1947 for the adjoining section southeastward.[87] In November 1949, the Hope–Princeton highway opened.[88]

By 1960, Greyhound had abandoned the Merritt–Princeton route. In September 1961, the replacement operator discontinued the run.[89]

In June 2018, Greyhound abandoned the Hope–Penticton route, which included Princeton.[90] The summer bus service between Kaslo and Vancouver, instituted by a regional operator in June 2019, routed through Princeton.[91] By 2023, the twice weekly service, which stopped in Princeton, had become year round.[92]

The South Okanagan-Similkameen Transit System operates a three times weekly schedule along the Coalmont-Penticton corridor, with connections to other BC Transit services at Penticton.[93]

Princeton Aerodrome is not served by any scheduled carriers and has extremely limited facilities. It was formerly home to an Air Cadet Gliding Program. The nearest airport with regional scheduled passenger services is Penticton Regional Airport, and with both regional and international destinations is Kelowna International Airport.

Maps

  • Sproat, Gilbert Malcolm (1873). British Columbia. Information for emigrants. p. 10 (1) – via library.ubc.ca.
  • "Rand McNally BC map". www.davidrumsey.com. 1925.
  • "Standard Oil BC map". www.davidrumsey.com. 1937.
  • "Shell BC map". www.davidrumsey.com. 1956.

Filming location

In 1987, Burt Reynolds starred in the film Malone, which was filmed mainly in neighbouring Hedley, but included key scenes in downtown Princeton and the surrounding area. Also partly shot in the area was Sean Penn's 2001 film The Pledge, starring Jack Nicholson, which was also filmed in Lytton and Lillooet.

Notable people

Later community

The 2021 flood submerged half the town after the rivers overflowed their banks and dikes. Water levels were 150 centimetres (59 in) higher than the 1995 flood.[103]

In the early 2020s, the downtown was again revitalized with the placement of bronze wildlife statues, sidewalk upgrades,[104] and visitor centre and RV campground enhancements, partially financed by a $750,000 federal government grant.[105]

Sunflower Downs, fairgrounds, Princeton, 2008

In 2023, 20 new temporary homes opened for seniors displaced by the 2021 flood.[106]

Culture and leisure

In addition to camping, fishing, hunting, and golf, popular activities include:

  • Bronze Sculpture Walk, which comprises wildlife sculptures along the main streets.
  • Observing the mounted Canadair CT-133 Silver Star weather vane at the airport entrance.
  • The Princeton and District Museum and Archives houses a fossil collection, First Nations artifacts, pioneer life exhibits, a 1900 stagecoach, and 1934 fire engine.
  • Biking or hiking the KVR or China Ridge trails in summer and cross country skiing and snow shoeing the trails during winter.[107]
  • Manning Park to the west offers a similar range of outdoor activities.[108]

Annual events include The Princeton Pro Rodeo, Family Day, and Canada Day celebrations.

Important facilities are the Centennial Pool, 700-seat hockey arena, curling rink, and 14 local parks.[31]

Demographics

Census population:
Princeton
YearPop.±%
19562,245—    
19612,163−3.7%
19662,151−0.6%
1971*2,607+21.2%
19763,132+20.1%
19813,051−2.6%
19862,910−4.6%
1991*2,839−2.4%
19962,826−0.5%
20012,610−7.6%
2006*2,780+6.5%
20112,724−2.0%
20162,828+3.8%
20212,894+2.3%
Source: Statistics Canada
[109][110][111][112][113][114][115]
[116][117][118][119]
* Revised figure

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Princeton had a population of 2,894 living in 1,377 of its 1,521 total private dwellings, a change of 2.3% from its 2016 population of 2,828. With a land area of 59.28 km2 (22.89 sq mi), it had a population density of 48.8/km2 (126.4/sq mi) in 2021.[120]

Ethnicity

Panethnic groups in the Town of Princeton (1986−2021)
Panethnic group 2021[121] 2016[122] 2011[123] 2006[124] 2001[125] 1996[126] 1991[127][128] 1986[129][130][131]: 106 
Pop. % Pop. % Pop. % Pop. % Pop. % Pop. % Pop. % Pop. %
European[a] 2,235 79.68% 2,415 87.5% 2,435 91.54% 2,410 91.29% 2,425 94.73% 2,605 93.2% 2,635 95.3% 2,680 93.71%
Indigenous 355 12.66% 280 10.14% 210 7.89% 210 7.95% 105 4.1% 75 2.68% 60 2.17% 130 4.55%
Southeast Asian[b] 75 2.67% 30 1.09% 0 0% 10 0.38% 10 0.39% 10 0.36% 15 0.54% 0 0%
South Asian 65 2.32% 15 0.54% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 10 0.36% 10 0.35%
East Asian[c] 40 1.43% 10 0.36% 10 0.38% 10 0.38% 20 0.78% 70 2.5% 35 1.27% 35 1.22%
African 15 0.53% 10 0.36% 0 0% 10 0.38% 0 0% 25 0.89% 0 0% 0 0%
Latin American 10 0.36% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 5 0.17%
Middle Eastern[d] 0 0% 10 0.36% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 10 0.36% 0 0%
Other/multiracial[e] 25 0.89% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Total responses 2,805 96.92% 2,760 97.6% 2,660 97.65% 2,640 98.62% 2,560 98.08% 2,795 98.9% 2,765 98.89% 2,860 98.28%
Total population 2,894 100% 2,828 100% 2,724 100% 2,677 100% 2,610 100% 2,826 100% 2,796 100% 2,910 100%
Note: Totals greater than 100% due to multiple origin responses

Religion

According to the 2021 census, religious groups in Princeton included:[121]

Climate

Princeton has a continental climate (Köppen Dfb) with semi-arid influences. It is located just east of the Cascade mountains, giving the town a rain shadow effect whereby the community receives very little precipitation relative to areas on the windward side of the Cascade mountains. Princeton is one of the sunniest places in British Columbia with 2,088 hours of sunshine annually. The 323 days per year with measurable sunshine, defined by having a minimum of 6 minutes of sunshine in a day,[132] is the most in the province, and one of the highest in Canada. The 29.4 days with measurable sunshine in March is the highest in the country.

Climate data for Princeton Aerodrome, 1981–2010 normals, extremes 1893–present.a
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 13.3
(55.9)
18.3
(64.9)
23.5
(74.3)
31.7
(89.1)
36.3
(97.3)
44.2
(111.6)
41.7
(107.1)
38.7
(101.7)
38.8
(101.8)
30.2
(86.4)
21.1
(70.0)
15.4
(59.7)
44.2
(111.6)
Mean daily maximum °C (°F) −1.4
(29.5)
2.6
(36.7)
9.1
(48.4)
14.4
(57.9)
18.8
(65.8)
22.3
(72.1)
26.3
(79.3)
26.7
(80.1)
21.7
(71.1)
13.2
(55.8)
3.5
(38.3)
−2.4
(27.7)
12.9
(55.2)
Daily mean °C (°F) −5.0
(23.0)
−2.3
(27.9)
2.8
(37.0)
7.1
(44.8)
11.3
(52.3)
14.8
(58.6)
17.9
(64.2)
17.9
(64.2)
13.2
(55.8)
6.8
(44.2)
−0.3
(31.5)
−5.6
(21.9)
6.6
(43.9)
Mean daily minimum °C (°F) −8.6
(16.5)
−7.2
(19.0)
−3.4
(25.9)
−0.3
(31.5)
3.7
(38.7)
7.3
(45.1)
9.5
(49.1)
9.0
(48.2)
4.7
(40.5)
0.3
(32.5)
−4.0
(24.8)
−8.9
(16.0)
0.2
(32.4)
Record low °C (°F) −45.0
(−49.0)
−41.7
(−43.1)
−33.3
(−27.9)
−13.9
(7.0)
−8.3
(17.1)
−3.9
(25.0)
−0.6
(30.9)
−4.4
(24.1)
−10.6
(12.9)
−23.1
(−9.6)
−34.5
(−30.1)
−42.8
(−45.0)
−45.0
(−49.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 39.7
(1.56)
20.5
(0.81)
16.5
(0.65)
18.4
(0.72)
29.6
(1.17)
37.6
(1.48)
29.6
(1.17)
24.3
(0.96)
23.8
(0.94)
26.1
(1.03)
44.5
(1.75)
36.4
(1.43)
346.9
(13.66)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 12.1
(0.48)
7.7
(0.30)
8.0
(0.31)
16.7
(0.66)
28.9
(1.14)
37.6
(1.48)
29.6
(1.17)
24.3
(0.96)
23.7
(0.93)
23.5
(0.93)
26.9
(1.06)
6.7
(0.26)
245.7
(9.67)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 33.9
(13.3)
16.2
(6.4)
10.2
(4.0)
1.9
(0.7)
0.7
(0.3)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.1
(0.0)
3.0
(1.2)
21.6
(8.5)
37.7
(14.8)
125.1
(49.3)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 13.5 9.2 9.2 9.5 11.3 11.0 8.2 7.1 7.8 10.8 13.4 12.6 123.5
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 3.7 3.4 5.7 8.4 11.0 11.0 8.2 7.1 7.8 10.0 8.0 2.5 86.8
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 11.6 6.9 4.7 1.6 0.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.3 7.2 11.4 45.1
Average relative humidity (%) 80.7 69.1 50.3 40.4 39.8 40.1 35.8 34.1 37.6 50.6 73.1 81.7 52.8
Mean monthly sunshine hours 59.0 99.8 159.9 199.6 247.3 255.5 300.2 285.3 219.3 146.9 66.6 48.2 2,087.5
Percent possible sunshine 21.9 35.0 43.5 48.5 52.0 52.6 61.2 63.9 57.8 43.8 24.2 18.8 43.6
Source: Environment Canada[133][134][135]

^a . Extreme high and low temperatures were recorded at Princeton from July 1936 to May 1942 and at Princeton Aerodrome from November 1936 to present.

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ "Princeton: Quick Facts". www.princeton.ca.
  2. ^ "Princeton". BC Geographical Names.
  3. ^ Mills 2013, pp. 12, 33.
  4. ^ Mills 2013, pp. 33–34.
  5. ^ Mills 2013, p. 13.
  6. ^ Mills 2013, p. 17.
  7. ^ Mills 2013, p. 20.
  8. ^ Mills 2013, p. 33.
  9. ^ "Marriage Certificate (ALLISON/MOIR)". www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca.
  10. ^ Mills 2013, p. 19.
  11. ^ "Postmasters". www.bac-lac.gc.ca.
  12. ^ a b Mills 2013, p. 21.
  13. ^ Mills 2013, p. 73.
  14. ^ a b Mills 2013, p. 74.
  15. ^ a b Mills 2013, p. 75.
  16. ^ Goodfellow, J.C. (1954). "Okanagan Historical Society: Outline History of Similkameen". library.ubc.ca: 158 (154).
  17. ^ "Daily Colonist". archive.org. 3 Apr 1900. p. 5.
  18. ^ Mills 2013, p. 77.
  19. ^ Mills 2013, p. 78.
  20. ^ Mills 2013, p. 79.
  21. ^ Mills 2013, p. 80.
  22. ^ "Order-in-council". www.bclaws.gov.bc.ca. 21 Sep 1978.
  23. ^ "Everything you've ever wanted to know about Princeton...". Princeton Visitors Guide. 2008. p. 6..
  24. ^ "Mountain of Copper". www.crowsnest-highway.ca.
  25. ^ "The Beginning of Princeton's Coal Business". www.crowsnest-highway.ca.
  26. ^ a b "Into Princeton". www.crowsnest-highway.ca.
  27. ^ "Princeton: The Old Cement Plant". www.crowsnest-highway.ca.
  28. ^ "Rainbow Lake Castle Resort". similkameenvalley.com.
  29. ^ a b Waterman, David and Fred (1974). "Okanagan Historical Society: Ernest (Judge) Waterman of Princeton". library.ubc.ca: 59–60 (57–58).
  30. ^ "Princeton Geography". www.princeton.ca.
  31. ^ a b c "About Princeton". princetonecdev.ca.
  32. ^ "Kelowna Capital News". www.kelownacapnews.com. 1 Dec 2020.
  33. ^ "Princeton Schools". www.sd58.bc.ca.
  34. ^ "Princeton Health Care". www.loyalhomes.ca.
  35. ^ "Similkameen Star". library.ubc.ca. 10 Nov 1909. p. 1.
  36. ^ "Similkameen Star". library.ubc.ca. 26 Jul 1911. p. 1.
  37. ^ "Similkameen Star". library.ubc.ca. 23 Apr 1915. p. 1.
  38. ^ "Princeton Star". library.ubc.ca. 8 Oct 1920. p. 1.
    "Daily Colonist". archive.org. 29 Oct 1920. p. 6.
  39. ^ a b "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 8 Oct 1933. p. 6.
  40. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 23 Dec 1909. p. 2.
  41. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 9 Mar 1913. p. 7.
  42. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 1 Jul 1914. p. 7.
  43. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 14 May 1916. p. 7.
  44. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 1 Oct 1922. p. 11.
  45. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 18 Jan 1925. p. 11.
  46. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 17 Jun 1928. p. 7.
  47. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 29 Mar 1931. p. 5.
  48. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.gn-npjointarchive.org. 14 Oct 1934. p. 6.
  49. ^ a b "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 25 Sep 1932. p. 469 (TT151).
  50. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 27 Jun 1915. p. 137 (TT124.5).
  51. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 5 Sep 1916. p. 160 (TT132).
  52. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 30 Nov 1919. p. 184 (TT125).
  53. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. Jan 1924. p. 11 (41).
  54. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 1929. p. 31 (TT122).
  55. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 28 Apr 1935. p. 12 (TT 70).
  56. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 5 Feb 1939. p. 126 (TT151).
  57. ^ "Timetable" (PDF). www.streamlinermemories.info. 27 Jun 1943. p. 46 (TT151).
  58. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 5 Dec 1948. p. 45 (TT151).
  59. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 25 Apr 1954. p. 44 (TT121).
  60. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 30 Oct 1960. p. 25 (TT40).
  61. ^ "Timetable". library.ubc.ca. 27 Oct 1963. p. 13 (TT99).
  62. ^ a b "The Kettle Valley Line". www.crowsnest-highway.ca.
  63. ^ "Mountain of Copper continued". www.crowsnest-highway.ca.
  64. ^ "Penticton Herald". www.pentictonherald.ca. 22 Sep 2022.
  65. ^ "Sunday Summit and Down to Princeton". www.crowsnest-highway.ca.
  66. ^ "Princeton BC train station and rail yard". www.bigdoer.com.
  67. ^ "Kettle Valley Rail (KVR) Trail". www.princeton.ca.
  68. ^ "Inland Sentinel". arch.tnrl.ca. 1 Jun 1882. p. A2.
  69. ^ "Commissioner of Land and Works annual report, 1885". library.ubc.ca. p. 32 (272).
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Notes

  1. ^ Statistic includes all persons that did not make up part of a visible minority or an indigenous identity.
  2. ^ Statistic includes total responses of "Filipino" and "Southeast Asian" under visible minority section on census.
  3. ^ Statistic includes total responses of "Chinese", "Korean", and "Japanese" under visible minority section on census.
  4. ^ Statistic includes total responses of "West Asian" and "Arab" under visible minority section on census.
  5. ^ Statistic includes total responses of "Visible minority, n.i.e." and "Multiple visible minorities" under visible minority section on census.

References

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Princeton, British Columbia
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