For faster navigation, this Iframe is preloading the Wikiwand page for Lesueur's frog.

Lesueur's frog

Lesueur's frog
Scientific classification Edit this classification
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Hylidae
Genus: Ranoidea
Species:
R. lesueuri
Binomial name
Ranoidea lesueuri
(Duméril & Bibron, 1841)
Distribution of the Lesueur's Frog

Lesueur's frog (Ranoidea lesueuri) is a species of ground-dwelling tree frog native to south-eastern Australia, from Sydney, New South Wales, to eastern Victoria.

Etymology

The specific name, lesueuri, is in honor of French naturalist Charles Alexandre Lesueur.[1]

Description

Lesueur's frog is a moderately large frog; females of this species reach 7 cm (2.8 in), while males reach about 4.5 cm (1.8 in). It ranges from pale to dark brown above, but males in the breeding season become bright yellow. Often, darker patches occur on the back. A dark stripe runs from the snout to the shoulder. The backs of the legs are blue with black spots, which helps distinguish this species from the very similar stony creek frog. The top half of the iris is pale and the bottom half dark. The toe discs are small and the belly is white.

Ecology and behaviour

Lesueur's frog spawn

Lesueur's frog is associated with rocky streams and creeks in coastal heath forests, montane areas, and rainforests. Males make a soft, purring call from beside creeks or from pools on the edges of streams during spring, summer, and autumn. Breeding occurs mostly after rain.

An average of about 1630 eggs are laid in single clump loosely attached to bedrock in streams. The eggs are normally laid in still pools of streams. Hatching occurs up to a week after laying. Tadpoles reach about 4.5 cm (1.8 in), and are golden brown. Metamorphosis occurs during summer and autumn, about 50–60 days after laying. Metamorph frogs are small, about 1.4 cm (0.6 in) and resemble the adult, but the dark stripe on the head is not very prominent.

In 2004, this species was divided into three separate species, with the stony creek frog north of Sydney and Ranoidea jungguy in northern Queensland.

References

  1. ^ Beoelens B, Watkins M, Grayson M. 2013. The Eponym Dictionary of Amphibians. Exeter, England: Pelagic Publishing Ltd. xiii + 262 pp. ISBN 978-1-907807-41-1. ("Lesueur", p. 124).

Further reading

  • Anstis, M. 2002. Tadpoles of South-eastern Australia. Reed New Holland: Sydney.
  • Robinson, M. 2002. A Field Guide to Frogs of Australia. Australian Museum/Reed New Holland: Sydney.
  • Frogs Australia Network
  • Frogs of Australia-frog call available here.
{{bottomLinkPreText}} {{bottomLinkText}}
Lesueur's frog
Listen to this article

This browser is not supported by Wikiwand :(
Wikiwand requires a browser with modern capabilities in order to provide you with the best reading experience.
Please download and use one of the following browsers:

This article was just edited, click to reload
This article has been deleted on Wikipedia (Why?)

Back to homepage

Please click Add in the dialog above
Please click Allow in the top-left corner,
then click Install Now in the dialog
Please click Open in the download dialog,
then click Install
Please click the "Downloads" icon in the Safari toolbar, open the first download in the list,
then click Install
{{::$root.activation.text}}

Install Wikiwand

Install on Chrome Install on Firefox
Don't forget to rate us

Tell your friends about Wikiwand!

Gmail Facebook Twitter Link

Enjoying Wikiwand?

Tell your friends and spread the love:
Share on Gmail Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Buffer

Our magic isn't perfect

You can help our automatic cover photo selection by reporting an unsuitable photo.

This photo is visually disturbing This photo is not a good choice

Thank you for helping!


Your input will affect cover photo selection, along with input from other users.

X

Get ready for Wikiwand 2.0 🎉! the new version arrives on September 1st! Don't want to wait?