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List of national liquors

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A bottle of the traditional Tunisian Boukha
Tequila, a national liquor of Mexico, is a spirit made from the blue agave plant, primarily in the area surrounding the city of Tequila, 65 kilometres (40 mi) northwest of Guadalajara, and in the highlands (Los Altos) of the western Mexican state of Jalisco.
Turkish Rakı
Georgian chacha
Italian fernet
Ouzo is an anise-flavored aperitif that is widely consumed in Greece and Cyprus, and a symbol of Greek culture.
"Very Old Rare Sherry", Pedro Ximenez by Garvey. Jerez de la Frontera (Andalusia, Spain), aged 30 years. Sherry is a national liquor of Spain.

This is a list of national liquors. A national liquor is a distilled alcoholic beverage considered standard and respected in a given country. While the status of many such drinks may be informal, there is usually a consensus in a given country that a specific drink has national status or is the "most popular liquor" in a given nation. This list is distinct from national drink, which include non-alcoholic beverages.

East Asia

Europe

Patxaran, a sloe berry liqueur

Ibero America and Caribbean

Pisco

Northern America

Oceania

South Asia

Two kinds of Arrack from Sri Lanka

Southeast Asia

Bottles of Sombai infused rice wine with hand-painted images of Angkor temples

West Asia

Toasting with rakı, in typical rakı glasses

See also

References

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  21. ^ "Error 300: User 60455 does not exist". open.salon.com. Retrieved 31 January 2015.
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  47. ^ Roy Arad (11 June 2013). "Between Arak and a Hard Place // Israeli Arak-lovers in a Panic as Cost of Beloved Spirit Set to Double". Haaretz.
  48. ^ Bill Beuttler (October 2000). "Learning Lebanese". Cooking Light. Retrieved 31 January 2015 – via billbeuttler.com.

Further reading

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List of national liquors
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