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KMIZ

KMIZ
The ABC network logo next to a silver 17 with black trim on a red oval. Beneath the base of the 17 is a red parallelogram with white letters K M I Z. Nestled in the lower right corner near the 7 is a gray parallelogram with silver letters "HD".
A rounded rectangle divided into blue and gray parts with the word "my" in white in the upper left, a gold "z o u" italicized in the upper right, and a black "T V" in the lower right.
CityColumbia, Missouri
Channels
Branding
  • ABC 17 KMIZ; ABC 17 News
  • MyZouTV (DT3)
Programming
Affiliations
Ownership
Owner
KQFX-LD
History
First air date
December 5, 1971 (52 years ago) (1971-12-05)
Former call signs
KCBJ-TV (1971–1985)
Former channel number(s)
  • Analog: 17 (UHF, 1971–2009)
  • Digital: 22 (UHF, 2003–2009)
  • ABC (1971–1982)
  • NBC (1982–1985)
Call sign meaning
Mizzou
Technical information[1]
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID63164
ERP120 kW → 231 kW (CP)
HAAT352 m (1,155 ft)
Transmitter coordinates38°46′32.1″N 92°33′24.9″W / 38.775583°N 92.556917°W / 38.775583; -92.556917
Links
Public license information
Websitewww.abc17news.com

KMIZ (channel 17) is a television station licensed to Columbia, Missouri, United States, serving the Columbia–Jefferson City market as an affiliate of ABC and MyNetworkTV. It is owned by the News-Press & Gazette Company alongside Fox affiliate KQFX-LD (channel 22, also licensed to Columbia); the stations together are branded as the "Networks of Mid-Missouri". The two stations share studios on the East Business Loop 70 in Columbia; KMIZ's transmitter is located west of Jamestown near the MoniteauCooper county line.

Channel 17 in Columbia began broadcasting as KCBJ-TV on December 5, 1971. It provided a full-time outlet for the ABC network, previously split between the market's two other major commercial stations. KCBJ-TV was built by Richard Koenig, a St. Louis–based engineer. It struggled in its early years with its ultra high frequency (UHF) signal, the first in the market; entrenched and established competition; and lack of financial resources to invest in local programming and technical improvements. In 1979, Koenig agreed to sell the station to the Wooster Republican Printing Company, but the deal turned sour, and the prospective buyers sued for breach of contract. Litigation in that case was still pending when an ascendant ABC switched its affiliation to KOMU-TV (channel 8) in 1982, leaving KCBJ-TV to change to NBC.

Koenig sold KCBJ-TV to Stauffer Communications, which took control in January 1985. With NBC rising in the ratings, it poached KOMU-TV from ABC, leading to a switch of network affiliations again that December. To coincide with the new affiliation and Stauffer's investment in a new image and improved news coverage, the station changed its call sign to KMIZ. Under Benedek Broadcasting ownership, KMIZ purchased two low-power stations to start the area's Fox affiliate, a predecessor of KQFX-LD. News-Press & Gazette Company acquired the stations from JW Broadcasting in 2012.

History

KCBJ-TV: Early years

Refer to caption
The Tiger Hotel in downtown Columbia housed KCBJ-TV's studios from 1971 to 1978.

In September 1969, Jeffco Television Corporation, associated with station WJJY-TV in Jacksonville, Illinois, applied to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for permission to build a station on ultra high frequency (UHF) channel 17 in Columbia. At the time, Mid-Missouri had no full-time affiliate of ABC; its programs were divided between NBC affiliate KOMU-TV (channel 8) and CBS affiliate KRCG (channel 13).[2] In November, Channel Seventeen, Inc., headed by Richard Koenig, also applied for the channel.[3] The two applications were designated by the commission for comparative hearing,[4] but Jeffco dropped out due to problems at its station in Illinois,[5] allowing Channel Seventeen to receive the construction permit on August 28, 1970.[3]

KCBJ-TV began broadcasting on December 5, 1971, as a full-time ABC affiliate.[6] It broadcast from a tower at Jamestown, Missouri,[5] 17 miles (27 km) southwest of Columbia.[7] The station's early months were pocked with technical issues; it was the only local station with a studio and transmitter at separate sites, and its feed for ABC network programming was the signal of KMTC-TV in Springfield—which, in turn, picked up the signal off-air from Joplin. If a network program was preempted in either of those cities, KCBJ-TV could not show it;[5][8] occasionally, weather warnings and other material from the Springfield area appeared on channel 17 as well.[9] In its first three and a half years of operation, the station never once made a profit, and as a result was unable to afford a microwave link that would have improved the quality of its network feed. In the ratings, KCBJ-TV struggled against KOMU and KRCG, which had been in the market nearly 20 years when channel 17 signed on and were better-funded stations with stronger local news presences. Koenig became aggressive in his efforts to defend channel 17 from competition. He unsuccessfully argued that KOMU-TV, a commercial station owned by the University of Missouri (MU) and the more successful of Columbia's two local stations, should be forced to become non-commercial and a new private commercial station on the UHF band opened to provide NBC programming. He successfully led the FCC to deny a tower upgrade for KTVO, an ABC affiliate in Kirksville, that threatened to take viewers away from his station in such cities as Moberly, Mexico, and Centralia.[5] He fought the introduction of cable television to Columbia, winning network non-duplication protection so that channel 17 was the only source for ABC network programs on the system—even though the CBS and NBC affiliates did not receive the same perk.[10] As the decade went on, channel 17 became more reliable and obtained the microwave link to improve its ABC signal.[9] In 1978, it acquired its present studio facilities from Columbia College, which had used the site to house its extended studies program; this enabled channel 17 to triple its office space and vacate its site in the Tiger Hotel downtown,[11] where it had utilized a portion of the hotel's parking garage.[12]

Koenig agreed in August 1979 to sell KCBJ-TV to the Wooster Republican Printing Company of Wooster, Ohio, controlled by the Dix family. The acquisition of channel 17 would have marked the return of the Dix family to television after their sale years prior of WTRF-TV in Wheeling, West Virginia.[13][9] Two months later, the Dix family sued, claiming Koenig had breached the sale contract; Koenig replied by declaring that there never was a valid contract.[14] In 1981, the Dix family won the initial lawsuit and a court order forcing Koenig to sell the station to them.[15] Koenig appealed the ruling; federal judge Scott Olin Wright, a former lawyer in Columbia, ordered the station to be transferred to a receiver during the process, but Koenig refused, claiming Wright held a grudge against KCBJ-TV from an earlier legal contact when the station started and that a short-form transfer of control was not appropriate for the process.[16]

As the appeals continued in the breach of contract case, ABC sought to move to the higher-rated KOMU-TV. In the late 1970s, ABC became the number-one network and began seeking upgrades in its affiliate base, primarily at the expense of NBC.[17] It contacted KOMU-TV, the number-one station in Mid-Missouri, in 1979; that was the year NBC hired Fred Silverman, and KOMU instead renewed with NBC in hopes that Silverman could turn around the network's low ratings. This did not materialize, and the station instead agreed to switch in 1982.[18] While it was logical that KCBJ-TV, the local station without a network affiliation, and NBC, the network needing a station, would connect, the ongoing ownership dispute complicated matters because the network received affiliation pitches from the Koenigs and the Dix family.[19] The switch was set for July 12, but Wright issued a temporary restraining order to prevent ABC from moving.[20] KOMU's ABC switch was then set for August 8, though no NBC deal was in place for channel 17 until late July.[21][22] The sale to Wooster Republican Printing Company fell through by February 1983.[23]

Stauffer ownership

In October 1984, Stauffer Communications agreed to purchase KCBJ-TV from the Koenig family,[24] assuming control in January 1985.[25] The company's first priority was to revamp the station's neglected and little-watched news operation, described by the Columbia Daily Tribune as "laughable at best" and by station manager Rush Evans as a "cursory programming service". It was a distant third behind KOMU and KRCG in the ratings, only attracting three percent of the audience. The newscasts finally had two cameras instead of one, and the news staff was increased from five employees to thirteen.[26] At the same time, the fortunes of NBC turned; the network was in the lead nationally, and KCBJ was the number-one station in prime time.[26] Citing its disappointment with revenues under ABC, KOMU announced it would return to NBC.[27] It was not alone; other recent converts from NBC to ABC were beginning to return to the network, including stations in Temple, Texas, and Savannah, Georgia.[28]

Stauffer affiliated channel 17 with ABC and used the opportunity to change the station's call letters, which it had already been considering. It discovered that KMIZ was assigned to an inactive U.S. Coast Guard vessel and had the call sign released for use.[29] The switch and new name took effect on December 30, 1985; at a party for employees, Evans blew up a large plaster and Styrofoam block bearing the KCBJ-TV call letters after the playing of "Taps".[30] The improved newscast increased ratings from a three percent share to 12 percent in 1986.[31]

The studio building of KMIZ in Columbia, Missouri, off East Business Loop 70. The station shares a studio with Fox affiliate KQFX-LD.

In 1995, Stauffer sold its holdings to Morris Communications. Morris kept the company's newspapers and spun off most of the television stations to Benedek Broadcasting of Rockford, Illinois, for $60 million (equivalent to $120 million in 2023[32]).[33] After being sold to Benedek, the station expanded its offerings. In April 1997, it acquired two low-power TV stations, K11TB in Jefferson City and K02NQ in Columbia.[34] In September in Columbia and on cable and in October in Jefferson City, it launched them as the first over-the-air Fox affiliate for the market; in 1996, KMIZ had carried Fox's coverage of the NFL and the World Series.[35][36] The next year, Benedek agreed to sell advertising for the local WB 100+ cable channel.[37] The partnership for the cable channel, "KJWB", transferred to KOMU-TV in January 2002.[38]

Chelsey and JW Broadcasting ownership

Financial problems developed at Benedek in the new millennium. The early 2000s recession reduced ad sales and caused the company to miss interest payments on a set of bonds issued in 1996, prompting a filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.[39] Benedek's financial issues hurt investment in KMIZ and led to staff cuts and the station canceling its 5 p.m. newscast in 2001.[40]

While most of Benedek's stations were sold out of bankruptcy to Gray Television, some—including KMIZ—went to Chelsey Broadcasting, an affiliate of the Chelsey Capital hedge fund which was a major investor in Benedek.[41] Chelsey owned KMIZ for a year before selling it to JosephWood (JW) Broadcasting, a partnership formed by David J. Joseph and James Wood.[42] JosephWood sought to turn around the station, which had been among Benedek's worst ratings performers, by investing in staff and capital improvements.[43] Among the upgrades was the 2004 switch of Fox from its existing low-power transmitters to channel 38 from a tower near Ashland, Missouri, which doubled Fox's reach;[44] the addition of a 9 p.m. local newscast on the Fox channel;[45] and the launch of two new services, UPN-affiliated "KZOU" and the Show Me Weather Channel, available on cable and from KMIZ's new digital transmitter.[46] The station improved its ratings in morning and late news but remained very far behind KRCG and KOMU in the early evening newscast race.[47] "KZOU" affiliated with MyNetworkTV when UPN merged with The WB to form The CW in 2006.[48]

In JW Broadcasting's final years, the station expanded its local news department. In 2011, it converted its newscasts to high-definition production, introduced the market's first local newscast at 6:30 p.m., and opened a newsroom in Jefferson City.[49]

News-Press & Gazette Company ownership

On July 26, 2012, JW Broadcasting announced the sale of KMIZ and KQFX-LD to the News-Press & Gazette Company (NPG) for $16 million (equivalent to $21 million in 2023[32]). The sale marked NPG's entry into a second Missouri TV market after starting a low-power station, KNPN-LD, in its home city of St. Joseph.[50] At the time, NPG CEO David Bradley served as chairman of the board of curators that runs the University of Missouri; facing concern that the deal might thus put Bradley in control of two local stations in contravention of FCC ownership limits, NPG argued that Bradley had no personal involvement in KOMU-TV's operations.[51] The sale was consummated on November 1.[52]

NPG has expanded the news department several times. In 2013, KMIZ debuted weekday newscasts at 9 a.m. and noon.[53] The station debuted weekend morning newscasts for KMIZ and KQFX in 2016;[54] by 2023, the station produced 30+12 hours a week of local news programming on its main channel.[55]

Notable former on-air staff

Technical information

Subchannels

The station's signal is multiplexed:

Subchannels of KMIZ[57]
Channel Res. Aspect Short name Programming
17.1 720p 16:9 KMIZ-DT ABC
17.2 480i MeTV MeTV
17.3 KZOU-TV KMIZ-DT3 / MyNetworkTV
17.4 720p KQFX Fox (KQFX-LD)
17.5 480i Bounce Bounce TV
  Simulcast of subchannels of another station

When JW Broadcasting began broadcasting KMIZ's digital signal, the station multiplexed KMIZ as well as "Fox 38", KZOU, and the Show Me Weather channel.[46] In 2012, the weather channel, since rebranded StormTrack 24/7, was replaced by MeTV, with station management citing the increasing availability of weather information on smartphones and other devices.[58]

Analog-to-digital conversion

KMIZ shut down its analog signal over UHF channel 17, on June 12, 2009, the official date on which full-power television stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate. The station's digital signal relocated from its pre-transition UHF channel 22 to channel 17 for post-transition operations.[59] Days after, KQFX was converted to digital and switched from channel 38 to channel 22.[60]

References

  1. ^ "Facility Technical Data for KMIZ". Licensing and Management System. Federal Communications Commission.
  2. ^ Putney, Mike (September 16, 1969). "Ask FCC approval to build TV station". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 1. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ a b "FCC History Cards for KMIZ". Federal Communications Commission.
  4. ^ "UHF applications are still pending". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. March 15, 1970. p. 12. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ a b c d Felts, Cynthia (July 20, 1975). "Sea of red ink marks Koenig's TV venture". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 3. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Columbia gets full network TV". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. December 6, 1971. p. 1. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Weather delays new TV tower". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. November 28, 1971. p. 12. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Burks, Norma (December 24, 1971). "Starting-out problems 'bug' new TV station". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. Entertainment 1. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ a b c Germond, Al (August 19, 1979). "Airwaves". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. Scene 5. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ Germond, Al (June 30, 1977). "KCBJ given CATV concessions". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 12. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ McConnell, Randy; Germond, Al (October 24, 1978). "KCBJ-TV to move into former college building". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 6. Retrieved December 22, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ Germond, Al (October 15, 1978). "Airwaves". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. Scene 6. Retrieved December 22, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ Fuson, Ken (August 8, 1979). "KCBJ sold to Ohio media chain pending FCC approval". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 1. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Suit claims KCBJ-TV owners breached contract to sell station". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. October 11, 1979. p. 8. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "Court orders KCBJ sold in breach of contract suit". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. June 5, 1981. p. 12. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ Rose, Forrest (May 5, 1982). "Federal judge puts KCBJ in hands of third party". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 10. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Rose, Forrest (March 31, 1982). "ABC wooing KOMU away from NBC". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 1. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "ABC Sniffs Out NBC Affiliate KOMU Missouri". Variety. April 7, 1982. p. 62. ProQuest 1438351193.
  19. ^ Butcher, Lola (June 30, 1982). "As the channels turn: affiliate drama ensnares NBC". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 12. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ Reilly, Mike (July 6, 1982). "Judge halts KOMU's ABC switch". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 12. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "TV swap delayed". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. July 14, 1982. p. 1. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "KCBJ-TV will become local NBC affiliate". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. July 27, 1982. p. 6. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "Action Line". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. February 23, 1983. p. 2. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ Anderson, Scott (October 16, 1984). "KCBJ-TV sold to Kansas firm". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 6. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Business In Brief". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. January 18, 1985. p. 5. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ a b Whiskeyman, Dolores (October 10, 1985). "New View: KCBJ expands, readies to run for the money with better broadcast". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 22. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ Hirsch, Mark (October 2, 1985). "KOMU to rejoin NBC; 'bottom line' cited". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 8. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "Rejoining NBC-TV Fold". Variety. October 16, 1985. p. 429. ProQuest 1438415729.
  29. ^ Brown, Nate (December 4, 1985). "KOMU and KCBJ prepare for network switch". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 12. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "TV networks' switch has explosive start". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. December 30, 1985. p. 10. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ Brown, Nate (September 4, 1986). "Rivals for Ratings". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. pp. Scene 10, 11. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023. Retrieved December 20, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
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  33. ^ "KGWC-TV sold to Illinois company". Casper Star-Tribune. December 6, 1995. p. C1. Archived from the original on June 22, 2020. Retrieved June 19, 2020.
  34. ^ "Notice". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. April 16, 1997. p. 5B. Retrieved December 22, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ Schuckman, Matt (August 29, 1997). "Fox station a boon for sports fans". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. p. 1B. Retrieved December 22, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Boonville takes boom to the bank". Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia, Missouri. August 28, 1997. p. 6B. Retrieved December 22, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ Coleman, Kevin (July 16, 1998). "KMIZ-TV teams with The WB on local cable". Columbia Daily Tribune.
  38. ^ Friedman, Steve (December 20, 2001). "KMIZ not mourning loss of WB - Network sees ratings promise at KOMU". Columbia Daily Tribune.
  39. ^ McClellan, Steve; Trigoboff, Dan (April 1, 2002). "Benedek couldn't hang on". Broadcasting & Cable. Archived from the original on June 21, 2020. Retrieved June 19, 2020.
  40. ^ Friedman, Steve (May 24, 2003). "Wright tickled by new chance to lead - Meteorologist gets chance to manage hometown station". Columbia Daily Tribune.
  41. ^ Friedman, Steve (July 3, 2002). "KMIZ dealt to investors in New York". Columbia Daily Tribune.
  42. ^ "KMIZ-ABC, KQFX-FOX sold to JosephWood Broadcasting". Jefferson City News-Tribune. May 3, 2003.
  43. ^ Friedman, Steve (May 1, 2003). "New owners take over KMIZ". Columbia Daily Tribune.
  44. ^ Weeks, Katie (April 8, 2004). "Fox sneaking into area broadcast households". Columbia Daily Tribune.
  45. ^ Harmon, Arcenia (September 23, 2003). "KQFX picks St. Joseph anchor for local newscast". Columbia Daily Tribune.
  46. ^ a b Norfleet, Don (July 10, 2004). "New Mid-Missouri Fox TV station broadcasts from tower in Ashland". Jefferson City News-Tribune.
  47. ^ Coleman, Kevin (December 29, 2005). "KOMU surges ahead in key timespots, ages". Columbia Daily Tribune.
  48. ^ Coleman, Kevin (June 10, 2006). "Technology pushes stations into new era: Mid-Missouri's TV affiliates are keeping competition at a fever pitch while struggling to pay for industry changes". Columbia Daily Tribune.
  49. ^ "KMIZ Adds 6:30 P.M., Goes HD". TVNewsCheck. October 11, 2011. Archived from the original on February 3, 2022. Retrieved December 22, 2023.
  50. ^ "JW Sells KMIZ-KQFX Columbia (Mo.) to NP&G". Broadcasting & Cable. July 26, 2012.
  51. ^ "NPG Buys ABC Affil In Columbia, Mo". TVNewsCheck. July 25, 2012. Archived from the original on May 9, 2013. Retrieved July 26, 2012.
  52. ^ "Consummation Notice". Consolidated Database System. Federal Communications Commission. November 1, 2012. Archived from the original on December 20, 2023.
  53. ^ "KMIZ Columbia Adding 9:00 a.m., Noon News". TVNewsCheck. August 21, 2013. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved August 21, 2013.
  54. ^ "KMIZ Launches Weekend Morning Newscast". TVNewsCheck. January 8, 2016. Archived from the original on October 18, 2021. Retrieved December 22, 2023.
  55. ^ "3rd Quarter Issues and Programming Report" (PDF). Public Inspection File, Federal Communications Commission. October 9, 2023.
  56. ^ Abramovitch, Seth (June 26, 2012). "Savannah Guthrie: 10 Things to Know About Ann Curry's Replacement". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on December 21, 2023. Retrieved December 21, 2023.
  57. ^ "TV Query for KMIZ". RabbitEars. Archived from the original on May 31, 2014. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  58. ^ "KMIZ Columbia, Mo., Adds Me-TV". TVNewsCheck. January 3, 2012.
  59. ^ "DTV Tentative Channel Designations for the First and Second Rounds" (PDF). Federal Communications Commission. May 23, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 29, 2013. Retrieved August 29, 2021.
  60. ^ Wright, Randy (May 30, 2009). "Only two weeks left to ready for end of analog". Columbia Daily Tribune.
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