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John Lloyd (judge)

Robert Salmon - Ships in harbor

Rev. John Lloyd DCL (1533-1607) was a Welsh lawyer, Judge of the High Court of Admiralty in London, board member of All Souls College, and a cofounder, along with Queen Elizabeth Tudor, of the first Protestant College at the University of Oxford.

Biography

Doddershall House, Pigott family
Oxford men and their colleges – All Souls'

John Lloyd was born in 1533, the third son of David Lloyd of Cevn Amwlch, in Lleyn, Carnarvonshire. He resided at Hartshorne, Derbyshire, and at his lodge in London. He married Elizabeth Pigott of Doddershall, daughter of Thomas Pigott (Bedfordshire MP), the High Sheriff of Buckinghamshire.[1] His brother-in-law was Thomas Pigott, Justice of the Peace, while his nephew, Thomas Pigott (Aylesbury MP), was son-in-law of Sir John Allot, the Lord Mayor of London.

Lloyd obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Oxford in 1542. He was a Fellow of All Souls College, member of the governing body of Oxford University.[2] He received the degrees of Bachelor of Civil Law in 1554 and Doctor of Civil Law in 1565. He became an advocate of the Canterbury Court of the Arches in 1566, and later, Judge of the High Court of Admiralty in London.[3] Lloyd worked under Lord Admirals, Edward Clinton, 1st Earl of Lincoln, husband of Elizabeth FitzGerald, and Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Nottingham, cousin of Elizabeth I and Anne Boleyn.

British Ships Warfare

As a Judge of the High Court of Admiralty, Lloyd had to deal with maritime issues, such as acts of piracy, and captures of warfare vessels and merchant ships by ennemies or competitors. He also had to settle the rights between merchants, seamen, and ship-owners. The Admiralty Court was considered a merchant's court, designed to protect the rights of traders, and dealt with the problems they encountered with pirates.[4] Lloyd worked during an important period of change, the Tudor period, which marked the beginning of the British Empire.[5]

With improvements in ship technology, capital financing, and with the discovery of new colonies around the world, Britain developed a policy of commercial and overseas expansion.[6] The reforms of Henry VIII, and later of Elizabeth Tudor, allowed the Admiralty Court to flourish as they were able to deal with more matters related to law and finance, such as commercial disputes, freight and charterparty, bills of exchange, lading, insurance, and hypothecation of ships.[7] This opened the way for Lloyd, who was an ambitious lawyer, as they needed more Judges to deal with the increasing complexity of maritime trade.

Later life

Engraving Jesus College 1740, Oxford University

In April 1559, Lloyd was appointed Dean of St Asaph in Wales but was removed from this position in November the same year.[8] In 1571, he was named in a charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I as one of the eight founding fellows of Jesus College, Oxford. That College was the first Protestant college at the University of Oxford and was the only college created there by Elizabeth Tudor.[9][10][11][12] Members of that charter, along with John Lloyd, were the Secretary of State, William Cecil of Burghley House; the Lord Chancellor of England, Sir Christopher Hatton of Holdenby Palace; the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, Nicholas Bacon of Old Gorhambury House, and a few others.

There was in total 8 founding fellows, 8 founding commissioners, 8 founding scholars, and a Principal. In 1589, Elizabeth Tudor issued a new Charter, reducing the members from 22 to 13, making all of them Commissioners with no more Fellows or Scholars. John Lloyd was one the thirteen founding Commissioners appointed by the Queen and was promoted from Fellow to Commissionner. Before Jesus College was founded, Lloyd had also been the Principal of White Hall at the University of Oxford.[13] He died in February 1607 and was buried in the Minster (church) at Chester Cathedral, in England.

Family members

John Lloyd was a member of the Griffith family of Cevn Amwlch, who rose to power after challenging the supremacy of the Wynn family of Gwydir.[14][15]

Coat of Arms of the Yale family of Plas-yn-Yale, in which the Lloyds married into

Members of his family included :

Children

John Lloyd children included :

References

  1. ^ Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd Edition, 2011. ISBN 9781461045137.
  2. ^ Richardson, D. (2011). Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families (2nd ed.). Douglas Richardson. p. 780. ISBN 978-1-4610-4513-7.
  3. ^ Foster, Joseph (1892). Alumni Oxonienses: The Members of the University of Oxford, 1500–1714. Parker and Co.
  4. ^ George F. Steckley (1978). "Merchants and the Admiralty Court during the English Revolution". The American Journal of Legal History. 22 (2). The American Journal of Legal History, Oxford University Press: 137–175. doi:10.2307/844622. JSTOR 844622. Retrieved 14 November 2022.
  5. ^ "Origins of the British Empire". www.britannica.com. Britannica.
  6. ^ "Origins of the British Empire". www.britannica.com. Britannica.
  7. ^ George F. Steckley (1978). "Merchants and the Admiralty Court during the English Revolution". The American Journal of Legal History. 22 (2). The American Journal of Legal History, Oxford University Press: 137–175. doi:10.2307/844622. JSTOR 844622. Retrieved 14 November 2022.
  8. ^ "Willis' Survey of St. Asaph, considerably enlarged and brought down to the present time" Edwards, E. p170: Wrexham, John Painter, 1801.
  9. ^ "Oxford's Six Tudor Colleges by John Tepper Marlin - the Tudor Society". 25 January 2019.
  10. ^ "Jesus College | Conference Oxford".
  11. ^ "Our History".
  12. ^ "Jesus College".
  13. ^ "The Founders". University of Oxford. Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  14. ^ Rodney Horace Yale (1908). "Yale genealogy and history of Wales : the British kings and princes, life of Owen Glyndwr, biographies of Governor Elihu Yale" (PDF). www.archive.org. pp. 87–88. Retrieved 13 November 2022.
  15. ^ "GRIFFITH family, of Cefn Amwlch, Penllech, Llŷn". www.biography.wales. Dictionary of Welsh Biography.
  16. ^ Rodney Horace Yale (1908). "Yale genealogy and history of Wales : the British kings and princes, life of Owen Glyndwr, biographies of Governor Elihu Yale" (PDF). www.archive.org. pp. 87–88. Retrieved 13 November 2022.
  17. ^ Rodney Horace Yale (1908). "Yale genealogy and history of Wales : the British kings and princes, life of Owen Glyndwr, biographies of Governor Elihu Yale" (PDF). www.archive.org. pp. 87–88. Retrieved 13 November 2022.
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John Lloyd (judge)
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