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Hendersonville, Tennessee

Hendersonville, Tennessee
Downtown Hendersonville
Downtown Hendersonville
Flag of Hendersonville, Tennessee
Motto: 
"The City by the Lake"
Location of Hendersonville in Sumner County, Tennessee (left) and of Sumner County in Tennessee (right)
Location of Hendersonville in Sumner County, Tennessee (left) and of Sumner County in Tennessee (right)
Coordinates: 36°18′17″N 86°37′12″W / 36.3047735°N 86.6199957°W / 36.3047735; -86.6199957
CountryUnited States
StateTennessee
CountySumner
Settled1784
Incorporated1901[1]
Named forWilliam Henderson (early settler)
Government
 • MayorJamie Clary
Area
 • Total38.18 sq mi (98.89 km2)
 • Land31.68 sq mi (82.04 km2)
 • Water6.50 sq mi (16.85 km2)
Elevation482 ft (147 m)
Population
 • Total61,753
 • Density1,949.58/sq mi (752.73/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
ZIP Codes
37075, 37077
Area code615
FIPS code47-33280[5][failed verification]
GNIS feature ID1287389[3]
Websitehttps://www.hvilletn.org/

Hendersonville is the most populous city in Sumner County, Tennessee, on Old Hickory Lake. As of the 2020 census the city's population was 61,753.[6]

Hendersonville is the fourth-most populous city in the Nashville metropolitan area after Nashville, Murfreesboro, and Franklin and the 10th largest in Tennessee. Hendersonville is located 18 miles (29 km) northeast of downtown Nashville. The city was settled around 1784 by Daniel Smith, whose house Rock Castle, completed in 1796, is maintained as an historic site.

The city is named for William Henderson, the first postmaster.[7]

History

In 1784 Daniel Smith received a land grant from the state of North Carolina in payment for surveying Middle Tennessee. (North Carolina at the time claimed its boundaries extended to this territory across the Appalachian Mountains.) He began work on his house later known as Rock Castle, but it was not completed until 1796. Due to his surveying trips, he frequently was gone on long journeys, and his wife supervised much of the construction.[8]

In 1790, William Henderson settled in Sumner County and later became the namesake of the town. It was a trading center for the county, which was devoted to the production of tobacco and hemp as commodity crops, and blood livestock: both horses and cattle. During the Civil War, Monthaven was used by Union troops as a field hospital, as they occupied Middle Tennessee from 1862 to 1870. In the late 20th century, this historic home was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Even before the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1863, refugee slaves with their families found their way to Union lines in the state in search of freedom. The Army established a contraband camp near Hendersonville, to offer shelter to the freedmen, help them with supplies and food, and sign them up to work for wages for the Army, often building defenses. Missionary societies helped teach both adults and children among the slaves.[citation needed]

The small city was not incorporated until 1969, as the area continued to be rural and devoted to agriculture and related activities. It then had roughly 250 residents and was led by L.H. "Dink" Newman. Since the late 20th and early 21st centuries, it has grown to become the largest city in the county.[9]

With the completion of the Old Hickory Dam and an associated lake in 1954, Hendersonville started to develop more rapidly. The lake attracted sportsmen and people seeking recreation; some became residents or acquired second homes here. Since the late 20th century, it has become the most-populous city of Sumner County, and one of the most populous suburbs of Nashville, along with Franklin and Murfreesboro.[9] The city contains around 0.7% of the population of Tennessee.[citation needed]

On December 9, 2023, a tornado hit the city and caused major damage.[10] The tornado killed 3 people in Madison, Tennessee, and left countless others injured. The National Weather Service in Nashville issued a Tornado Emergency for Hendersonville and Gallatin, Tennessee only a few minutes before the tornado struck.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 32.9 square miles (85 km2), of which 27.3 square miles (71 km2) is land and 5.6 square miles (15 km2) (16.93%) is water, mostly parts of the Cumberland River.

Hendersonville is served by the freeway Tennessee State Route 386 and its parallel surface road U.S. Route 31E.

Climate

Hendersonville's climate classifications are Köppen "Cfa" and Trewartha "DOak" due to very hot summers (three to four months average over 71.6 °F (22.0 °C)), mild winters (all months average over 32.0 °F (0.0 °C)), and mediocre (4–7 months) growing seasons (in this case seven months average over 50.0 °F (10.0 °C)).

Climate data for Old Hickory Dam, TN (1991–2020 normals, extremes 1965–present) [11]
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 73
(23)
79
(26)
86
(30)
91
(33)
94
(34)
106
(41)
106
(41)
105
(41)
101
(38)
96
(36)
87
(31)
76
(24)
106
(41)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 67
(19)
72
(22)
79
(26)
86
(30)
91
(33)
96
(36)
97
(36)
97
(36)
95
(35)
88
(31)
77
(25)
69
(21)
99
(37)
Mean daily maximum °F (°C) 47.0
(8.3)
51.4
(10.8)
60.5
(15.8)
71.3
(21.8)
78.9
(26.1)
86.1
(30.1)
89.9
(32.2)
90.2
(32.3)
83.4
(28.6)
72.1
(22.3)
60.1
(15.6)
50.2
(10.1)
70.1
(21.2)
Daily mean °F (°C) 37.1
(2.8)
40.7
(4.8)
48.6
(9.2)
58.2
(14.6)
66.9
(19.4)
75.1
(23.9)
78.5
(25.8)
78.6
(25.9)
71.6
(22.0)
59.7
(15.4)
47.9
(8.8)
39.5
(4.2)
58.5
(14.7)
Mean daily minimum °F (°C) 27.2
(−2.7)
30.0
(−1.1)
36.8
(2.7)
45.0
(7.2)
54.9
(12.7)
64.1
(17.8)
67.0
(19.4)
67.0
(19.4)
59.8
(15.4)
47.2
(8.4)
35.7
(2.1)
28.8
(−1.8)
47.0
(8.3)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 10
(−12)
13
(−11)
21
(−6)
31
(−1)
40
(4)
54
(12)
59
(15)
58
(14)
48
(9)
33
(1)
22
(−6)
17
(−8)
9
(−13)
Record low °F (°C) −10
(−23)
0
(−18)
8
(−13)
21
(−6)
34
(1)
47
(8)
52
(11)
54
(12)
36
(2)
26
(−3)
14
(−10)
6
(−14)
−10
(−23)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.73
(95)
4.26
(108)
4.64
(118)
4.74
(120)
4.55
(116)
3.76
(96)
4.05
(103)
3.38
(86)
3.70
(94)
3.33
(85)
3.35
(85)
4.44
(113)
47.93
(1,217)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 0.6
(1.5)
0.3
(0.76)
0.2
(0.51)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.1
(0.25)
1.2
(3.0)
Source: https://www.weather.gov/wrh/climate?wfo=ohx

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1880170
189021526.5%
1970412
198026,5616,346.8%
199032,18821.2%
200040,62026.2%
201051,37226.5%
202061,75320.2%
Sources:[12][13][6][4]

2020 census

Hendersonville racial composition[14]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 47,783 77.38%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 5,310 8.6%
Native American 151 0.24%
Asian 1,307 2.12%
Pacific Islander 54 0.09%
Other/Mixed 3,180 5.15%
Hispanic or Latino 3,968 6.43%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 61,753 people, 21,328 households, and 14,788 families residing in the city.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census,[15] there were 51,372 people, 20,111 households, and 14,239 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,881.76 persons per square mile, and the housing unit density was 736.67 units per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 88.64% White, 6.28% Black or African American, 1.58% Asian, 0.33% Native American, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 1.21% from other races, and 1.89% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origins were 3.62% of the population.

Of the 20,111 households, 33.47% had children under the age of 18 living in them, 55.71% were married couples living together, 3.92% had a male householder with no wife present, 11.17% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.20% were non-families. 24.35% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.77% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.04.

Of the 51,372 residents, 25.80% were under the age of 18, 61.41% were between the ages of 18 and 64, and 12.79% were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.5 years. 51.71% of the residents were female and 48.29% were male.

The median household income in the city was $62,627 and the median family income was $74,353. Males had a median income of $54,016 versus $34,996 for females. The per capita income for the city was $30,000. About 6.5% of families and 8.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.0% of those under the age of 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 and over.

2000 census

As of the census[5][failed verification] of 2000, there were 40,620 people, 15,823 households, and 11,566 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,486.4 inhabitants per square mile (573.9/km2). There were 16,507 housing units at an average density of 604.0 per square mile (233.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.93% White, 4.12% African American, 0.27% Native American, 1.10% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.71% of the population.

There were 15,823 households, out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.3% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.9% were non-families. 22.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 25.8% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $50,108, and the median income for a family was $57,625. Males had a median income of $40,823 versus $27,771 for females. The per capita income for the city was $24,165. About 5.2% of families and 6.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.2% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Indian Lake Village is a business, shopping, residence, and recreation complex located in Hendersonville.

Arts and culture

The Hendersonville Arts Council[16] is a non-profit organization located in Monthaven Mansion. The mansion was built before the Civil War and was used as a hospital during several battles. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Tennessee Civil War Trail, and Ring of Fire, and exhibits visual art, music, workshops, wine tastings, crafts, culinary demonstrations, performances, and cultural activities.[citation needed]

The Hendersonville Performing Arts Center[17] is a non-profit theater founded in 1996.[citation needed]

Government

Hendersonville is governed by a board of 12 aldermen and a mayor, known as the Board of Mayor and Aldermen (BOMA).[18][19] The aldermen are elected by district for staggered terms of four years. The mayor is elected once every four years by the whole city.[20]

Education

Hendersonville High School

Public schools

Hendersonville's schools are governed by the Sumner County Schools. Schools located in Hendersonville include:[21]

  • Anderson Elementary
  • Beech Elementary
  • Beech High School
  • Dr. William Burrus Elementary at Drakes Creek
  • Ellis Middle School
  • Gene Brown Elementary School
  • George Whitten Elementary
  • Hawkins Middle School
  • Hendersonville High School
  • T. W. Hunter Middle School
  • Indian Lake Elementary
  • Knox Doss at Drakes Creek Middle School
  • Lakeside Park Elementary
  • Merrol Hyde Magnet School
  • Nannie Berry Elementary School
  • Walton Ferry Elementary School

Private schools

Notable people

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources in this section. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.Find sources: "Hendersonville, Tennessee" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (May 2024) (Learn how and when to remove this message)

See also

References

  1. ^ Tennessee Blue Book Archived August 3, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, 2005–2006, p. 620.
  2. ^ "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 15, 2022.
  3. ^ a b U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Hendersonville, Tennessee
  4. ^ a b "Census Population API". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 15, 2022.
  5. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  6. ^ a b "QuickFacts: Hendersonville city, Tennessee". census.gov. Retrieved August 20, 2021.
  7. ^ "William Henderson - 3B 53 - Hendersonville, TN - Tennessee Historical Markers on Waymarking.com". www.waymarking.com. Archived from the original on March 13, 2018. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  8. ^ "Family History of General Daniel Smith". Archived from the original on April 24, 2012. Retrieved May 16, 2012.
  9. ^ a b "City of Hendersonville - Home". www.hvilletn.org. Archived from the original on March 8, 2018. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  10. ^ Latham, Angele (December 9, 2023). "Damage from tornadoes, severe weather reported in Middle Tennessee". The Tennessean. Retrieved December 10, 2023.
  11. ^ "Climate".
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing: Decennial Censuses". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 4, 2012.
  13. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 11, 2013. Retrieved December 11, 2013.
  14. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 26, 2021.
  15. ^ "Hendersonville city, Tennessee". United States Census Bureau. 2010. Retrieved January 3, 2020.
  16. ^ http://www.hendersonvillearts.com.html [permanent dead link]
  17. ^ "theatre, Hendersonville Performing Arts Company Hendersonville, TN Home". Archived from the original on August 12, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  18. ^ "Mayor". City of Hendersonville Tennessee. Archived from the original on November 16, 2015. Retrieved December 7, 2015.
  19. ^ "List of Hendersonville Aldermen". City of Hendersonville Tennessee. Archived from the original on November 16, 2015. Retrieved December 7, 2015.
  20. ^ Nixon, Katie (November 10, 2020). "Hendersonville mayor re-elected, vows to eliminate city administrator position in second term". The Tennessean. Retrieved March 19, 2023.
  21. ^ "Our Schools". Sumner County Schools. Retrieved February 13, 2022.
  22. ^ "Medical Examiner Makes Preliminary Ruling in Death of Gary Allan's Wife." Archived February 18, 2009, at the Wayback Machine CMT. October 25, 2004. Retrieved on December 8, 2008.
  23. ^ "Duane Allen." The Oak Ridge Boys. Retrieved on December 8, 2008.
  24. ^ David Cook live in Seacrest Studios! Retrieved: May 11, 2016.
  25. ^ "James Bass Obituary - Nashville, TN". Dignitymemorial.com. Retrieved August 10, 2021.
  26. ^ "Joe Bonsall (@joebonsall) - Twitter". Archived from the original on September 26, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  27. ^ "Young Buck’s Home Raided By Armed Federal Agents" WordOfSouth. August 4, 2010. Retrieved on August 10, 2010.
  28. ^ "Jesse Brand - @JesseBrandMusic" Archived May 28, 2016, at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on August 21, 2016.
  29. ^ a b "Rockabilly Hall of Fame". Archived from the original on August 12, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  30. ^ a b "Fire Destroys Johnny Cash's Hendersonville Home." Archived June 20, 2008, at the Wayback Machine WTVF. April 11, 2007. Retrieved on December 8, 2008.
  31. ^ "Biography." Archived February 13, 2009, at the Wayback Machine William Lee Golden. Retrieved on December 8, 2008.
  32. ^ "Former Tennessee State basketball coach Harold Hunter dies". The City Paper. March 7, 2013. Archived from the original on November 2, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  33. ^ "Pacman May Turn To Pro Wrestling." Archived August 2, 2009, at the Wayback Machine WTVF. July 30, 2007. Retrieved on December 8, 2008.
  34. ^ "Karen Jarrett (@karenjarrett) - Twitter". Archived from the original on July 5, 2015. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  35. ^ "RAB Hall of Fame: Bob Luman". Archived from the original on June 1, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  36. ^ "Country star, Ronnie McDowell, brings donations to Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital." Archived May 14, 2009, at the Wayback Machine Vanderbilt University. June 15, 2004. Retrieved on December 16, 2008.
  37. ^ "Bill Monroe's Goodlettsville Home [Archive] - Mandolin Cafe Forum". Archived from the original on August 9, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  38. ^ "Shape Shifter."[permanent dead link] Nashville Scene. September 2002. Retrieved on December 16, 2008.
  39. ^ "Josef Newgarden". Archived from the original on August 10, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  40. ^ "Roy Orbison." Archived March 9, 2012, at the Wayback Machine The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved on December 16, 2008.
  41. ^ "Home - Sonny Osborne". Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  42. ^ Streissguth, Michael. Johnny Cash: The Biography. Da Capo Press, 2006. 156. ISBN 0-306-81368-8
  43. ^ "Tommy Rogers – Online World of Wrestling". Archived from the original on February 26, 2012. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  44. ^ Adam Gold (September 6, 2013). "Ed Sheeran: 'I'm hoping to Release Three Albums in Three Years'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  45. ^ "Connie Smith's House in Hendersonville, TN". Archived from the original on January 26, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  46. ^ "Phil Stacey: 9 Facts". Archived from the original on November 22, 2010. Retrieved May 16, 2012.
  47. ^ "Businessmen zero in on homes of Cash family, Marty Stuart". The Tennessean. Retrieved December 23, 2016.
  48. ^ "The Tennessean". Archived from the original on July 12, 2015. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  49. ^ Will, Carole And (June 9, 2011). "On the road again...: Twitty City is alive & well in Hendersonville, TN". On the road again... Archived from the original on December 23, 2016. Retrieved December 23, 2016.
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Hendersonville, Tennessee
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