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Falange Española

Spanish Phalanx
Falange Española
LeaderJosé Antonio Primo de Rivera
Founded29 October 1933
Dissolved15 February 1934
Preceded byMovimiento Español Sindicalista
Merged intoFalange Española de las JONS
Student wingSindicato Español Universitario
IdeologyFascism[1]
Falangism
Political positionFar-right[2]

Falange Española (FE; English: Spanish Phalanx) was a Spanish fascist political organization active from 1933 to 1934.[3]

History

Alfonso García Valdecasas, Ruiz de Alda and Primo de Rivera in the 1933 foundational meeting

The Falange Española was created on 29 October 1933 as the successor of the Movimiento Español Sindicalista (MES), a similar organization founded earlier in 1933. (Falange translates as Phalanx in English.) The foundational meeting took place in La Comedia Theatre [es] of Madrid and was conducted by José Antonio Primo de Rivera, Julio Ruiz de Alda and Alfonso García Valdecasas.[4] In February 1934, after poor results at the ballots in the 1933 election, José Antonio Primo de Rivera suggested a fusion of Falange Española with the Ramiro Ledesma's Juntas de Ofensiva Nacional-Sindicalista, which was approved on 15 February.[5] The Falange Española de las JONS (FE de las JONS) was subsequently formed.

The Falange's first clash with Marxist groups took place on 5 November 1933, when its militants had a rift with socialist sympathizers at a football game in Almoradí (Province of Alicante).[6]

References

  1. ^ Slaven 2018, p. 235. "On October 29, 1933, José Antonio Primo de Rivera founded a fascist political party in Madrid, Spain, called Falange Española (FE)." (...) "The FE was a distinctly fascist movement, containing “nearly all the general qualities and characteristics… of generic fascism” (Payne 1995, 261)".
  2. ^ Winkler 2015, p. 297.
  3. ^ Southworth, H. Rutledge (1939). "The Spanish Phalanx and Latin America". Foreign Affairs. 18 (1): 148–152. doi:10.2307/20028984. ISSN 0015-7120.
  4. ^ Box & Saz 2011, p. 374.
  5. ^ Albanese & Hierro 2016, p. 29.
  6. ^ González Calleja 2011, p. 171.

Bibliography

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Falange Española
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