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Fahey–Armstrong ministry

Fahey–Armstrong ministry
84th Cabinet of Government of New South Wales
Date formed26 May 1993
Date dissolved4 April 1995
People and organisations
MonarchQueen Elizabeth II
GovernorPeter Sinclair
PremierJohn Fahey
Deputy PremierIan Armstrong
No. of ministers22
Ministers removed1
Total no. of members21
Member partyLiberalNational coalition
Status in legislatureMinority Coalition Government
Opposition partiesLabor
Opposition leaderBob Carr
History
Outgoing election1995 New South Wales state election
PredecessorSecond Fahey ministry
SuccessorFirst Carr ministry

The Fahey–Armstrong ministry or Third Fahey ministry was the 84th ministry of the New South Wales Government, and was led by the 38th Premier of New South Wales, John Fahey, representing the Liberal Party in coalition with the National Party, led by Ian Armstrong.

The ministry covers the period from 26 May 1993 until 4 April 1995, when the coalition was defeated at the 1995 state election by Labor, led by Bob Carr.

Composition of ministry

The ministry commenced on 26 May 1993 and there was a single rearrangement in June 1994, when Terry Griffiths was forced to resign from both the ministry and the Liberal Party over claims of sexual harassment.[1][2][3][a][b]

Portfolio Minister Party Term commence Term end Term of office
Premier John Fahey   Liberal 26 May 1993 4 April 1995 1 year, 313 days
Minister for Economic Development
Deputy Premier Ian Armstrong   National
Minister for Public Works
Minister for Ports
Minister for Transport[c] Bruce Baird   Liberal
Minister for Roads
Minister for Land and Water Conservation George Souris   National
Attorney General[c] John Hannaford, MLC   Liberal
Minister for Justice
Vice-President of the Executive Council[c]
Leader of the Government in Legislative Council
Minister for Planning Robert Webster, MLC[c]   National
Minister for Housing
Minister for Energy[b] Garry West 27 June 1994 1 year, 32 days
Ted Pickering, MLC 27 June 1994 4 April 1995 281 days
Minister for Local Government and Cooperatives[b] Garry West 26 May 1993 27 June 1994 1 year, 32 days
Ted Pickering, MLC 27 June 1994 4 April 1995 281 days
Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs Virginia Chadwick, MLC   Liberal 26 May 1993 1 year, 313 days
Minister for Tourism
Minister Assisting the Premier
Treasurer Peter Collins
Minister for the Arts[c]
Minister for Health Ron Phillips
Minister for Industrial Relations and Employment Kerry Chikarovski
Minister for the Status of Women
Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries Ian Causley   National
Minister for Mines
Minister for Police[a] Terry Griffiths   Liberal 27 June 1994 1 year, 32 days
Garry West   National 27 June 1994 4 April 1995 281 days
Minister for Emergency Services[a] Terry Griffiths   Liberal 26 May 1993 27 June 1994 1 year, 32 days
Garry West   National 27 June 1994 4 April 1995 281 days
Minister for Community Services[c] Jim Longley   Liberal 26 May 1993 1 year, 313 days
Minister for Aboriginal Affairs
Minister for the Ageing 6 October 1993 1 year, 180 days
Minister for the Environment Chris Hartcher[c] 26 May 1993 1 year, 313 days
Chief Secretary Anne Cohen[c]
Minister for Administrative Services
Minister for Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs Michael Photios
Minister Assisting the Minister for Justice
Minister for Consumer Affairs Wendy Machin   National
Minister Assisting the Minister for Roads
Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport 6 October 1993 1 year, 180 days
Minister for Sport, Recreation and Racing Chris Downey   Liberal 26 May 1993 1 year, 313 days
Minister for Small Business Ray Chappell   National
Minister for Regional Development

  Ministers are members of the Legislative Assembly unless otherwise noted.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Terry Griffiths was forced to resign from the ministry on 27 June 1994. Garry West was appointed to his portfolios of Police and Emergency Services.
  2. ^ a b c Ted Pickering returned to the ministry, appointed to Garry West's portfolios of Energy, Government and Cooperatives.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Retained portfolio from the second Fahey ministry.

References

  1. ^ "Oatley: NSW State election". Crikey. 2011. Retrieved 10 July 2011.
  2. ^ "Part 6 Ministries since 1856" (PDF). NSW Parliamentary Record. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  3. ^ "Former Members". Members of Parliament. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2020.

 

New South Wales government ministries Preceded byFahey–Murray ministry (1992–1993) Fahey–Armstrong ministry 1993–1995 Succeeded byCarr ministry (1995–1997)
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Fahey–Armstrong ministry
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