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Cabinet of South Africa

Coat of Arms
Overview
Established1910
Country South Africa
LeaderPresident
Appointed byCyril Ramaphosa
Ministries30
Responsible toPresident of South Africa
HeadquartersUnion Buildings, Pretoria

The Cabinet of South Africa is the most senior level of the executive branch of the Government of South Africa. It is made up of the president, the deputy president, and the ministers.[1]

Overview

The president appoints the deputy president and ministers; assigns their powers and functions, and may dismiss them. The president may select any number of ministers from the members of the National Assembly, and may select no more than two ministers from outside the assembly. As of 2023 Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs Minister Thembi Nkadimeng and Electricity Minister Kgosientso Ramokgopa are the two cabinet ministers who are not members of the National Assembly. While deputy ministers are not members of the cabinet, they are required to assist relevant ministers in the execution of their duties.

A member of the Cabinet is appointed by the president to be the leader of government business in the National Assembly.[2]

History

On 31 May 1910, former Boer military general and the former prime minister of the Transvaal Colony Louis Botha became the first prime minister of the newly established Union of South Africa—the forerunner of the modern South African state. He appointed the first cabinet of the Union of South Africa after the general election held on 15 September 1910. It consisted of members of the now-defunct South African Party.[3] For the next fourteen years, it only consisted of members of the SAP. Botha died in 1919 and was replaced with another Boer general and SAP member, Jan Smuts.[4]

In 1924, J. B. M. Hertzog of the National Party became prime minister through a coalition with the Labour Party and appointed a cabinet that consisted of National Party and Labour Party members. In 1934, the Hertzog's National Party and the South African Party merged to form the United Party.[5] Hertzog won the 1938 general election, but in 1939 the United Party was divided between supporters of Hertzog and those of his Justice Minister Jan Smuts because of the question of South Africa's role in the Second World War. Hertzog was voted out in the United Party and resigned as prime minister, which allowed Jan Smuts to form a government in coalition with the Dominion Party and the Labour Party.[6] The 1948 general election was won outright by D. F. Malan's Herenigde Nasionale Party and Malan appointed his first cabinet composed of National Party members. For the next forty-six years, South Africa would be governed by the National Party.

On 31 May 1961, South Africa became a republic and Queen Elizabeth II was replaced as head of state with a state president with largely ceremonial powers.[7] The Prime Minister was still head of government and appointed/dismissed members of the cabinet. In 1984, the constitution was amended and the office of prime minister was abolished while the office of state president was given more responsibilities. State president P. W. Botha was now the head of state and head of government.[8] In the 1984 tricameral parliamentary elections, Allan Hendrickse's Labour Party won a majority of seats in the coloured House of Representatives, while Amichand Rajbansi's National People's Party won a plurality of seats in the Indian House of Delegates.[9] Hendrickse and Rajbansi were appointed to serve in Botha's second cabinet as Minister of Coloureds' Affairs and Minister of Indian Affairs, respectively, becoming the first non-white members of the South African cabinet.

In 1989, Rina Venter became the first woman to hold a cabinet post in South African history.[10] Following the end of apartheid and the first multi-racial elections in 1994, Nelson Mandela became the first black president of South Africa and appointed a Government of National Unity consisting of African National Congress, National Party, and Inkatha Freedom Party members. In 1996, the National Party withdrew from the GNU and the cabinet's composition has been dominated by ANC members since then. The Inkatha Freedom Party continued to hold seats in the government, as minority partners, until the elections of 2004. In 2014, Lynne Brown became the first openly LGBT person to serve as a cabinet minister in South Africa and Africa.[11]

In 2019, President Cyril Ramaphosa appointed the first gender-balanced cabinet in South African history.[12]

Members of the current cabinet

Cyril Ramaphosa was appointed president of South Africa by parliament on 15 February 2018.[13] On 26 February, he announced a major Cabinet reshuffle, including the appointment of David Mabuza as deputy president.[14] The president announced a cabinet reshuffle on 22 November 2018, following the death of Minister Edna Molewa and the resignation of Malusi Gigaba.[15] On 29 May 2019, following the 2019 general election, President Ramaphosa announced a new cabinet in which the number of ministers was reduced from 36 to 28.[16] On 5 August 2021, Cyril Ramaphosa announced another major Cabinet Reshuffle following the resignation of Minister Zweli Mkhize and Minister Tito Mboweni. The reshuffle also comes after the death of Minister Jackson Mthembu and deputy minister Bavilile Hlongwa. On 6 March 2023, Ramaphosa announced a major cabinet reshuffle following the resignation of David Mabuza as deputy president.[17]

Office Portrait Incumbent Term started
President Cyril Ramaphosa
(born 1952)
ANC 15 February 2018 (2018-02-15)

2,295 days
Deputy President Paul Mashatile
(born 1961)
ANC 7 March 2023 (2023-03-07)

449 days
Minister in the Presidency Khumbudzo Ntshavheni
(born 1977)
ANC 6 March 2023 (2023-03-06)

450 days
Minister in the Presidency responsible for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Maropene Ramokgopa
(born 1980)
ANC 7 March 2023 (2023-03-07)

449 days
Minister in the Presidency responsible for Electricity Kgosientso Ramokgopa
(born 1975)
ANC 7 March 2023 (2023-03-07)

449 days
Minister of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma
(born 1949)
ANC 6 March 2023 (2023-03-06)

450 days
Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development Thoko Didiza
(born 1965)
ANC 30 May 2019 (2019-05-30)

1,826 days
Minister of Basic Education Angie Motshekga
(born 1955)
ANC 12 May 2009 (2009-05-12)

5,496 days
Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies Mondli Gungubele
(born 1957)
ANC 6 March 2023 (2023-03-06)

450 days
Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs Thembi Nkadimeng
(born 1973)
ANC 7 March 2023 (2023-03-07)

449 days
Minister of Defence and Military Veterans Thandi Modise
(born 1959)
ANC 6 August 2021 (2021-08-06)

1,027 days
Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries Barbara Creecy
(born 1958)
ANC 30 May 2019 (2019-05-30)

1,826 days
Minister of Employment and Labour Thulas Nxesi
(born 1959)
ANC 30 May 2019 (2019-05-30)

1,826 days
Minister of Finance Enoch Godongwana
(born 1957)
ANC 5 August 2021 (2021-08-05)

1,028 days
Minister of Health Joe Phaahla
(born 1957)
ANC 5 August 2021 (2021-08-05)

1,028 days
Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology Blade Nzimande
(born 1958)
ANC 30 May 2019 (2019-05-30)

1,826 days
Minister of Home Affairs Aaron Motsoaledi
(born 1958)
ANC 30 May 2019 (2019-05-30)

1,826 days
Minister of Human Settlements Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane
(born 1978)
ANC 5 August 2021 (2021-08-05)

1,028 days
Minister of International Relations and Cooperation Naledi Pandor
(born 1953)
ANC 30 May 2019 (2019-05-30)

1,826 days
Minister of Justice and Correctional Services Ronald Lamola
(born 1983)
ANC 30 May 2019 (2019-05-30)

1,826 days
Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy Gwede Mantashe
(born 1955)
ANC 27 February 2018 (2018-02-27)

2,283 days
Minister of Police Bheki Cele
(born 1952)
ANC 27 February 2018 (2018-02-27)

2,283 days
Minister of Public Enterprises Pravin Gordhan
(born 1949)
ANC 27 February 2018 (2018-02-27)

2,283 days
Minister of Public Service and Administration Noxolo Kiviet
(born 1963)
ANC 7 March 2023 (2023-03-07)

449 days
Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure Sihle Zikalala
(born 1973)
ANC 7 March 2023 (2023-03-07)

449 days
Minister of Small Business Development Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams
(born 1978)
ANC 5 August 2021 (2021-08-05)

1,028 days
Minister of Social Development Lindiwe Zulu
(born 1958)
ANC 30 May 2019 (2019-05-30)

1,826 days
Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture Zizi Kodwa
(born 1970)
ANC 7 March 2023 (2023-03-07)

449 days
Minister of Tourism Patricia de Lille
(born 1951)
GOOD 6 March 2023 (2023-03-06)

450 days
Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition Ebrahim Patel
(born 1962)
ANC 30 May 2019 (2019-05-30)

1,826 days
Minister of Transport Sindisiwe Chikunga
(born 1958)
ANC 7 March 2023 (2023-03-07)

449 days
Minister of Water and Sanitation Senzo Mchunu
(born 1958)
ANC 5 August 2021 (2021-08-05)

1,028 days

Deputy Ministers

Deputy ministers are appointed by the president of South Africa. They are not members of the cabinet. They assist cabinet ministers in the execution of their duties. As of September 2021, these are the deputy ministers of South Africa.[18]

Post Deputy Minister Term
Deputy Minister of Basic Education Reginah Mhaule May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies Philly Mapulane August 2021 – present
Deputy Minister of Correctional Services Patekile Holomisa May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Defence and Military Veterans Thabang Makwetla May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Employment and Labour Boitumelo Moloi May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries Maggie Sotyu May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Finance David Masondo May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Health Sibongiseni Dhlomo August 2021 – present
Deputy Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology Buti Manamela October 2017 – present
Deputy Minister of Home Affairs Njabulo Nzuza May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Human Settlements Pam Tshwete August 2021 – present
Deputy Minister of International Relations and Cooperation Candith Mashego-Dlamini
Alvin Botes
May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development John Jeffery October 2013 – present
Deputy Minister of Land Reform Mcebisi Skwatsha May 2014 – present
Deputy Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy Nobuhle Nkabane August 2021 – present
Deputy Minister of Police Cassel Mathale May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Public Enterprises Obed Bapela March 2023 – present
Deputy Minister of Public Service and Administration Chana Pilane-Majake August 2021 – present
Deputy Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure Bernice Swarts March 2023 – present
Deputy Minister of Rural Development Rosemary Capa August 2021 – present
Deputy Minister of Small Business Development Dipuo Peters March 2023 – present
Deputy Minister of Social Development Hendrietta Bogopane-Zulu May 2014 – present
Deputy Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture Nocawe Mafu May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Tourism Fish Mahlalela May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry Fikile Majola
Nomalungelo Gina
May 2019 – present
Deputy Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs Parks Tau
Zolile Burns-Ncamashe
March 2023 – present
Deputy Minister of Transport Lisa Mangcu March 2023 – present
Deputy Minister of Water and Sanitation David Mahlobo
Judith Tshabalala
August 2021 – present
March 2023 – present
Deputy Minister in the Presidency (Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities) Sisisi Tolashe March 2023 – present
Deputy Minister in The Presidency Nomasonto Motaung
Kenneth Morolong
March 2023 – present

Former ministerial portfolios

The president may restructure cabinet at his discretion, meaning that ministerial portfolios may be changed or dissolved.[19] Defunct ministerial portfolios include:

Portfolio Start End Successors
Education 1989 2009 Divided into the Ministry of Basic Education and the Ministry of Higher Education and Training.[20]
Agriculture and Land Affairs 1996 2009 Divided into sections absorbed into the new Ministry of Rural Development and Land Reform and into the new Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries.[20]
Correctional Services

(formerly Ministry of Prisons)

1990 2014 Merged into the new Ministry of Justice and Correctional Services.[21]
Arts and Culture 2004 2019 Merged to create the Ministry of Sport, Arts and Culture.[22]
Sport and Recreation

(formerly Sport)

1993
Rural Development and Land Reform 2009 2019 Merged into the new Ministry of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development.[22]
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 2009 2019 Merged into the new Ministry of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development and into the new Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries.[22]
Economic Development 2009 2019 Absorbed into the Ministry of Trade and Industry.[22]
Mineral Resources

(formerly Mining)

2009 2019 Re-merged to create the Ministry of Mineral Resources and Energy.[22]
Energy
State Security

(formerly Intelligence Services)

1999 2021 Abolished and its functions transferred to the Minister in the Presidency.[23]
Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation 2019 2021 Re-divided into the Ministry of Human Settlements and the Ministry of Water and Sanitation.[23]

Lists of cabinets since 1910

References

  1. ^ "The Constitution of South Africa". GCIS. 1996.
  2. ^ "About Government". South Africa Government Online. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014.
  3. ^ "1. South Africa (1910-present)". uca.edu. Retrieved 12 March 2022.
  4. ^ "Jan Smuts | South African statesman | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved 12 March 2022.
  5. ^ "South Africa". 16 October 2007. Archived from the original on 16 October 2007. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  6. ^ "J.B.M. Hertzog | prime minister of South Africa | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved 12 March 2022.
  7. ^ "The Republic of South Africa is established | South African History Online". www.sahistory.org.za. Retrieved 12 March 2022.
  8. ^ Arooran, K. Nambi (1984). "Recent Constitutional Reforms in South Africa and the Attitude of South African Indians". Proceedings of the Indian History Congress. 45: 829–839. ISSN 2249-1937. JSTOR 44140281.
  9. ^ "The Tricameral Parliament | South African History Online". www.sahistory.org.za. Retrieved 12 March 2022.
  10. ^ Claiborne, William (17 September 1989). "S. AFRICAN LEADER RESHUFFLES CABINET". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 12 March 2022.
  11. ^ "South Africa appoints first lesbian to cabinet". the Guardian. 26 May 2014. Retrieved 12 March 2022.
  12. ^ "South Africa gets gender-balanced cabinet". BBC News. 30 May 2019. Retrieved 12 March 2022.
  13. ^ "Matamela Cyril Ramaphosa, Mr". South African Government. Retrieved 15 February 2018.
  14. ^ "Mabuza hired, Nene's back as Ramaphosa shakes up Cabinet". TimesLIVE. 26 February 2018. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  15. ^ "#CabinetReshuffle: Ramaphosa announces new ministers and a merge". IOL News. 22 November 2018. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  16. ^ Ramaphosa, Cyril (29 May 2019). "Statement on the appointment of members of the National Executive" (Press release). The Presidency. Retrieved 15 August 2020.
  17. ^ Zyl, Corné van (6 March 2023). "Cabinet reshuffle: Here's EVERY change made by Ramaphosa". The South African. Retrieved 7 March 2023.
  18. ^ "Photo gallery - Faces of government | Government Communication and Information System (GCIS)". www.gcis.gov.za. Retrieved 20 March 2022.
  19. ^ "Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996". South African Government. Retrieved 17 January 2022.
  20. ^ a b "Statement by President Jacob Zuma on the appointment of the new Cabinet". South African Government. 10 May 2009. Retrieved 17 January 2022.
  21. ^ "President Jacob Zuma announces members of the National Executive, Pretoria". Presidency. 25 May 2014. Archived from the original on 27 May 2014. Retrieved 18 July 2014.
  22. ^ a b c d e "President Cyril Ramaphosa announces reconfigured departments" (Press release). Presidency. 14 June 2019. Retrieved 9 August 2020.
  23. ^ a b "President Cyril Ramaphosa: Changes to the national executive". South African Government. 5 August 2021. Retrieved 17 January 2022.
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Cabinet of South Africa
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