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Bazaya

Bazaya
Issi'ak Assur
King of Assur
Reignc. 1649–1622 BC[1]
PredecessorIptar-Sin
SuccessorLullaya
IssueShu-Ninua
FatherIptar-Sin

Bazaya, Bāzāia or Bāzāiu, inscribed mba-za-a-a and of uncertain meaning, was the ruler of Assyria c. 1649 to 1622 BC, the 52nd listed on the Assyrian King List, succeeding Iptar-Sin, to whom he was supposedly a great-uncle. He reigned for twenty-eight years and has left no known inscriptions.[2]

Biography

The Assyrian king lists[i 1][i 2][i 3] give Bazaya’s five predecessors as father-son successors, although all reigned during a fifty-two period, stretching genealogical credibility. All three extant copies give his father as Bel-bani, the second in the sequence, whose reign had ended forty-one years earlier and who had been the great-grandfather of his immediate predecessor.[3] The literal reading of the list was challenged by Landsberger who suggested that the three preceding kings, Libaya, Sharma-Adad I and Iptar-Sin may have been Bel-bani's brothers.[4]

The Synchronistic Kinglist[i 4] gives his Babylonian counterpart as Peshgaldaramesh of the Sealand Dynasty. He was succeeded by Lullaya, a usurper, whose brief reign was followed by that of Bāzāiu’s own son, Shu-Ninua.[5]

Inscriptions

  1. ^ Khorsabad List, IM 60017 (excavation nos.: DS 828, DS 32-54), ii 20.
  2. ^ SDAS List, IM 60484, ii 18.
  3. ^ Nassouhi List, Istanbul A. 116 (Assur 8836), ii 15.
  4. ^ Synchronistic Kinglist, Ass 14616c (KAV 216), I 6’.

References

  1. ^ Bertman, Stephen (2003). Handbook to Life in Ancient Mesopotamia. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 81. ISBN 978-0195183641.
  2. ^ A. K. Grayson (1972). Assyrian Royal Inscriptions, Volume 1. Otto Harrassowitz. pp. 30–31.
  3. ^ B. Newgrosh (1999). "The Chronology of Ancient Assyria Re-assessed". Journal of the Ancient Chronology Forum. 8: 79–80.
  4. ^ J. A. Brinkman (1998). "Bēl-bāni". In K. Radner (ed.). The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, Volume 1, Part 2: B–G. The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project. p. 288.
  5. ^ K. Radner (1998). "Bāzāiu". The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, Volume 1, Part 2: B–G. The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project. p. 278.
Preceded byIptar-Sin King of Assyria 1649–1622 BC Succeeded byLullaya
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Bazaya
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