For faster navigation, this Iframe is preloading the Wikiwand page for Albanese government.

Albanese government

This article needs to be updated. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (March 2023)

Albanese government
In office
23 May 2022 – present
MonarchElizabeth II
Charles III
Governor-GeneralDavid Hurley
Prime MinisterAnthony Albanese
DeputyRichard Marles
PartyAustralian Labor Party
StatusMajority
OriginLabor wins 2022 federal election
PredecessorMorrison government

The Albanese government is the federal executive government of Australia, led by Prime Minister Anthony Albanese of the Australian Labor Party. The Albanese government commenced on 23 May 2022, when Albanese and an interim ministry of four other Labor MPs were sworn into their relevant ministerial portfolios by the Governor-General of Australia.[1] The government is composed of members of the Australian Labor Party. The party initially governed with 77 seats on the floor of the House of Representatives, enough for a two-seat majority.[a] Albanese succeeded the Scott Morrison-led Liberal/National Coalition government (2018–2022), which became unable to continue in government following their defeat in the 2022 federal election. This is the first Labor government to be in office at the federal level since the second Rudd government was defeated by the Coalition at the 2013 election. Deputy Labor leader Richard Marles is serving as Deputy Prime Minister of Australia.[2]

Background

2022 federal election

The 2022 federal election was called by Morrison on 10 April 2022, when he visited the Governor-General advising the latter to prorogue Parliament and dissolve the House of Representatives. The Governor-General accepted Morrison's recommendations, as is the custom in Australia's Westminster system of government.[3][4] The Parliament was then prorogued and the House of Representatives dissolved the next morning.

The Labor election campaign focused on aged care in Australia, the introduction of a National Anti-Corruption Commission, childcare subsidies, climate change, a similar Defence budget to the Coalition but with a Defence Posture Review into resources and strategy, education, electric vehicles, farming, health, housing, infrastructure, a review of the NDIS, as well as measures to help older Australians.[5]

The election was held on 21 May 2022.[6] As of 10:00PM AEST on election night, the Labor Party (led by Anthony Albanese) was projected to form a government by ABC News, although it was not clear whether they would have a majority or a minority.[7] Notable outcomes included the popularity of community independents in several inner-city seats, costing Treasurer and Deputy Liberal Leader Josh Frydenberg his seat; a particularly sizable swing from the Coalition to Labor in Western Australia; and notably strong support for the Australian Greens in some inner-city Brisbane seats.

After the bulk of the votes had been counted and a Labor victory appeared inevitable, Morrison conceded the election, and then announced his intention to resign as the Liberal Party leader.[8] The Coalition's loss was attributed to Morrison's unpopularity with voters and the popularity of centrist "teal independents" in certain inner-city electorates.[9][10] Albanese, who also made history as the first Italian-Australian to secure the position of Prime Minister,[11] was sworn in as the new Prime Minister of Australia on 23 May 2022.[12]

Appointments

Interim Ministry

Although it was not certain on election night that Labor would win a majority, no other party could realistically form a government. Accordingly, two days after the election, Albanese, deputy leader Richard Marles, shadow treasurer Jim Chalmers, and senators Penny Wong and Katy Gallagher were sworn in as an interim five-person ministry. The five ministers divided all portfolios between them until the full ministry was determined. According to Australia's ABC News, the governor-general David Hurley would not have sworn in Albanese without assurances that Labor could provide stable government, as well as legal advice that this was the proper course of action. Albanese confirmed that he secured confidence and supply from the crossbench in the event that he was not able to form majority government.[13]

Ministry

Albanese announced the composition of the full Albanese Ministry on 31 May 2022. Given that frontbenchers Kristina Keneally and Terri Butler were not re-elected, Murray Watt and Clare O’Neil were chosen by the Labor caucus to replace them in the cabinet. With 19 female frontbenchers and 10 female cabinet ministers, it will be the most gender equal ministry in Australian history. The full ministry was sworn in by the Governor-General on 1 June 2022.[14][15]

Public service

Phil Gaetjens, the Secretary of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet under Scott Morrison, took leave the day before the Albanese government was sworn in. This had been expected given Albanese had indicated he would not want Gaetjens to continue in the role.[16] On 30 May 2022 it was announced that Glyn Davis had been appointed by Albanese to replace Gaetjens.[17]

Judiciary

On 17 October 2022, Jayne Jagot was sworn in as a Justice of the High Court of Australia, replacing the retiring Justice Patrick Keane. On Jagot's appointment, the High Court of Australia had a majority of female Justices for the first time in its history.[18]

Ambassadorships

On 30 September 2022, the government announced that it had nominated former Defence Minister Stephen Smith as the next High Commissioner of Australia to the United Kingdom.[19]

On 20 December 2022, the government announced that it had nominated former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd as the next Ambassador of Australia to the United States.[20]

Term of government (2022–present)

Foreign affairs

This section needs expansion with: update and additional citations, images, and explanation. You can help by adding to it. (August 2022)
Penny Wong and Antony Blinken at the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue meeting

Penny Wong was sworn in as Minister for Foreign Affairs on 23 May 2022 as part of the interim Albanese ministry. The new Prime Minister and Minister flew to Tokyo almost immediately after being sworn in to attend a Quadrilateral Security Dialogue meeting with fellow world leaders United States President Joe Biden, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida. At the meeting, Albanese and Wong confirmed that the new government intended to make additional action on climate change a key part of Australia's foreign policy moving forward.[21]

The next day Wong announced that she intended to make her next international trip to Fiji almost immediately after returning to Australia in order to demonstrate the new government's commitment to Australia's relationship with Pacific neighbours.[22]

Days after his election, Albanese spoke with French President Emmanuel Macron and the pair vowed to begin rebuilding a bilateral relationship between Australia and France following the souring of relations under the Morrison government.[23]

On 6 June 2022, Albanese along with Foreign Minister Wong, Trade Minister Don Farrell and Industry Minister Ed Husic visited Indonesian President Joko Widodo in Jakarta to reaffirm relations with Indonesia and ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations).[24][25]

On 10 June 2022, Albanese hosted New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern on her first official visit to Australia since 2020. The two leaders discussed a range of issues including Australia's controversial Section 501 deportation policy (which had disproportionately affected New Zealanders living in Australia), growing Chinese influence in the Pacific Islands, climate change, and working with Pacific neighbours. On the subject of the 501 deportation policy, Albanese indicated that he would look at addressing New Zealand's concerns about the deportation of its citizens.[26][27]

On 11 June 2022, Albanese announced that the French defence contractor Naval Group had agreed to settle the previous Morrison government's 2021 cancellation of the 12 Attack-class submarines for a €555 million (AU$830 million)[28] compensation settlement. In response, French Armed Forces Minister Sébastien Lecornu welcomed the settlement and stated that France aims to rebuild its relationship with Australia. In addition, Albanese announced plans to travel to France to reset bilateral relations between Australia and France.[29][30]

On 12 June 2022, Deputy Prime Minister and Defence Minister Richard Marles held a meeting with Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe at the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore. It was the highest-level contact between Australia and China in almost three years following a deterioration in Australia-China relations under the previous Morrison government. The two ministers discussed an incident involving the Chinese interception of a Royal Australian Air Force Boeing P-8 Poseidon over the South China Sea and political developments in the Pacific Islands.[31] Earlier, Marles reiterated his government's commitment to pursuing a "productive relationship" with China while advancing its own national interests and regional security within a rules-based system. In response to Chinese concerns that AUKUS was a "mini-NATO", Marles stated that AUKUS was not an alliance similar to NATO but rather focused on the "sharing and development of capabilities" between Australia, the United Kingdom, and United States.[32]

On 14 June 2022, Albanese met with Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Mark Brown. He stated that, the Australian Government is keen to engage with the Pacific and chart a path forward as a partner of choice.[33]

On 15 June 2022, Marles meet with Japanese Defence Minister Kishi Nobuo.[34] Deputy Prime Minister Marles said:

I joined Kishi Nobuo in Tokyo earlier today. Australia and Japan both recognise the critical importance of our bilateral defence relationship.

On 17 June 2022, Wong visited Solomon Islands and met with Prime Minister of Solomon Islands Manasseh Sogavare.[35] She wrote:

Thank you Prime Minister Sogavare for our constructive meeting today. Australia deeply values our partnership with Solomon Islands. I look forward to strengthening our cooperation as we work together to face shared challenges & achieve shared goals, including on climate change.

On 27 June 2022, Wong visited Vietnam. In Vietnam, she met President of Vietnam Nguyen Xuan Phuc, Prime Minister of Vietnam Pham Minh Chinh and Foreign Affairs Minister Bùi Thanh Sơn.[36]

On 28 June 2022, Wong visited her birthplace of Malaysia, she met with Minister for Foreign Affairs Dato' Sri Saifuddin bin Abdullah, as well as Defence Minister Dato' Seri Hishammuddin Hussein and Minister for International Trade and Industry, Dato' Seri Azmin Ali.[37]

On 28 June 2022, Albanese visited Madrid for a NATO summit, where he met Prime Minister of Spain Pedro Sánchez.[38] He stated:

An honour to be welcomed by Spanish Prime Minister Pedros Sánchez in Madrid today. Our discussion covered the NATO Summit, getting momentum back into a trade agreement between Europe and Australia, and the need to act on climate change.

On 30 June, Albanese met with French President Macron in Paris to "reset" Australia–France bilateral relations, which had been damaged following the cancellation of a submarine deal by the preceding Morrison government.[39][40]

Albanese meeting with Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskyy in Kyiv

On 1 July, Albanese travelled to Ukraine to meet with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, making him the first Australian Prime Minister to make a diplomatic visit to Ukraine. Albanese pledged a further $100 million in aid to assist with the ongoing Russo-Ukrainian War.[41] In addition, Albanese and the Australian delegation visited Kyiv and Bucha on 4 July, which had seen fighting with Russian forces.[42]

In November 2022, Albanese held a bilateral meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping bringing an end to the longest diplomatic freeze in 50 years between Australia and China.[43]

In early December 2022, Albanese hosted Finnish Prime Minister Sanna Marin in Sydney; which marked the first state visit by a Finnish head of government to Australia. During the visit, the two leaders discussed several issues including the Australia-European Union trade agreement, human rights, the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and climate change mitigation.[44][45]

Albanese, US president Joe Biden, and British prime minister Rishi Sunak at the AUKUS meeting in San Diego

On 7 February 2023, Albanese hosted his New Zealand counterpart Chris Hipkins, who had succeeded Ardern in late January 2023. Besides reaffirming Australian-New Zealand bilateral relations, they also discussed the controversial Section 501 deportation policy. Albanese reiterated that his government would revise the deportation policy to take into account individuals' connections to Australia and the length of time they had lived in the country.[46][47]

On 10 November, Albanese and Tuvalan Prime Minister Kausea Natano signed a bilateral pact between Australia and Tuvalu. Under the terms of the treaty, Tuvalan citizens will be given a "special mobility pathway" that would allow them to live and work in Australia. In addition, Australia will respond to major natural disasters, pandemics or military aggression against Tuvalu. In return, Australia will have a veto power over Tuvalu's security and defence agreements with other countries.[48][49]

In early February 2024, Foreign Minister Wong and Defence Minister Marles hosted their New Zealand counterparts Winston Peters and Judith Collins for a joint bilateral meeting of foreign and defence ministers in Melbourne. Marles confirmed that Australia would send officials to brief their New Zealand counterparts about AUKUS Pillar Two, which would focus on advanced military technology including quantum computing and artificial intelligence. New Zealand is not expected to join AUKUS Pillar One due to its nuclear-free policy. The two governments also committed to reinforced security cooperation in the Indo-Pacific and increased military integration between the Australian and New Zealand militaries.[50][51]

In May 2024, RNZ reported that the Albanese Government had slightly increased Australia's foreign aid budget by four percent, bringing its total 2024-2025 aid o A$4.961 billion budget. In August 2023, the Government had released its new international development strategy, which promised new country, gender, disability and humanitarian aid strategies.[52]

Indigenous affairs

Linda Burney, current Minister for Indigenous Affairs

When declaring victory on election night, Albanese confirmed that his government was committed to implementing the Uluru Statement from the Heart in full within its first term.[53] At Albanese's first press conference as Prime Minister, the podium flags in the blue room at Parliament were changed to include Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander flags in addition to the Australian flag.[54] Upon the opening of the new Parliament, both flags began to be displayed in the House of Representatives and Senate chambers.[55]

Linda Burney was sworn in as Minister for Indigenous Affairs on 1 June 2022. She is the first Indigenous woman to serve in the role.[56]

On 30 July 2022, Albanese attended the Garma Festival of Traditional Cultures where he announced the proposed question the government intends to put to a referendum for the inclusion of an Indigenous Voice to Parliament in the Australian Constitution: "Do you support an alteration to the Constitution that establishes an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice?".[57]

In August 2022, Albanese and Burney held a press conference with famed basketballer Shaquille O'Neal, who endorsed the Indigenous Voice to Parliament.[58]

On 3 February 2023, all first ministers signed a statement of intent through the National Cabinet committing to support constitutional recognition of a Voice to Parliament.[59]

The 2023 Australian Indigenous Voice referendum was held on 14 October 2023,[60] and rejected the change to the constitution.[61]

Justice

National Anti-Corruption Commission

Attorney-General of Australia Mark Dreyfus in 2015

During the election campaign, Albanese confirmed that his government would seek to establish a federal National Anti-Corruption Commission within its first year in office.[62] On the day he was sworn in, Albanese confirmed that he had already ordered work to begin on this task.[63] Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus confirmed that the government intended to introduce legislation to establish an anti-corruption commission by the end of 2022. Dreyfus said that the government's legislation will include provision for the commission to investigate pork-barrelling as well as “serious and systemic” past corruption allegations.[64]

Dreyfus introduced a bill to establish a National Anti-Corruption Commission in September 2022.[65] The bill passed the Parliament on 30 November 2022 in line with the government's commitment to establish an anti-corruption commission prior to the end of 2022.[66]

Bernard Collaery prosecution

On 7 July 2022, Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus exercised his power under section 71 of the Judiciary Act to cease proceedings against Bernard Collaery in connection with the Australia–East Timor spying scandal.[67]

Immigration

Clare O'Neil, current Minister for Home Affairs

Clare O'Neil was appointed Minister for Home Affairs.[68]

On 27 May 2022, Jim Chalmers announced that he had, as interim Minister for Home Affairs, exercised his power to allow the Murugappan family to return home to Biloela on bridging visas.[69]

In September 2022, the Albanese government increased the permanent migration intake from 160,000 to a record 195,000 a year.[70][71][72] Net overseas migration is expected to reach 650,000 over 2022-2023, and 2023-2024, the highest in Australian history.[73]

In late 2022, the Albanese government started repatriation of ISIS brides from Syria. Some Western Sydney locals and mayors criticised the repatriations, as well as the Opposition. The government has not revealed the cost of the repatriations.[74][75]

On 1 February 2023, Minister for Immigration Andrew Giles confirmed that the Australian Government would preserve the Section 501 deportation policy but issued a ministerial directive for the Department of Home Affairs to consider deportees' length of time in Australia and ties to the community. This directive comes into effect on 3 March 2023. The announcement was welcomed by New Zealand Prime Minister Chris Hipkins.[76][77] By contrast, deportee advocate Filipa Payne regarded the Australian Government's changes as insufficient, objecting to the mandatory detention policy and the continual deportation of individuals deemed dangerous by the Government.[78]

On 22 April 2023, Albanese, O'Neil, and Giles announced the creation of a new direct pathway to Australian citizenship for New Zealand Special Category Visa (SCV) holders, commencing 1 July 2023. Under the policy, SCV holders who have resided in Australia for at least four years and met other residency requirements will be eligible to apply for Australian citizenship without having to apply for permanent residency.[79] In addition, children born in Australia to a New Zealander from 1 July will automatically be eligible for Australian citizenship.[80] The announcement was welcomed by New Zealand Prime Minister Chris Hipkins and Oz Kiwi chairperson Joanne Cox for improving New Zealanders' access to Australian citizenship, health and social security services.[81][80]

In the leadup to the 2022 election, Labor promised that it would abolish temporary protection visas, as of early 2023 it had allowed 19,000 asylum seekers to permanently settle in Australia.[82]

Abdul Nacer Benbrika, a convicted terrorist, has had his Australian citizenship restored.[83]

Indefinite immigration detention has been held to be unlawful by the High Court.[84] In response to this ruling and demands from those indefinitely detained, the Albanese government began releasing people clearly impacted by the case.[85] Within a week, 80 people were released, with Giles saying that all are on visa conditions including reporting.[86] The Albanese government is seeking to clarify if the government must release people from immigration detention if they have refused to cooperate with attempts to deport them.[87] The government is seeking to enact legislation that will jail immigration detainees and unlawful non-citizens for a minimum of one year if they do not cooperate with attempts to deport them.[88]

In 2024, the government signalled changes that would make it easier for international students to settle permanently in Australia.[89]

Industrial relations and employment

Tony Burke, current Minister for Employment and Leader of the House

Tony Burke was appointed Minister for Employment. On 23 May 2022, Albanese announced that he would summon an employment summit including unions and business leaders. The summit was expected to be held in September 2022. Albanese flagged a number of changes to industrial relations law including criminalising wage theft.[62]

On 27 May 2022, the Prime Minister sent correspondence to the Fair Work Commission confirming that his government would seek to make a submission to the Commission in support of an increase to the minimum wage.[90] Burke announced that a submission had been formally made to the commission on 3 June 2022 and that a ‘deliberate’ policy of lower wages was not the policy of the new government.[91] The Fair Work Commission subsequently announced on 15 June 2022 that the minimum wage would be raised by 5.2%.[92]

The government passed new workplace harassment laws through the Parliament on 28 November 2022. The news laws implement the recommendation of the Respect@Work Report to create a positive duty requiring employers to implement measures to prevent sexual harassment, sex discrimination and victimisation.[93]

On 2 December 2022, the government's Secure Jobs, Better Pay law passed the Parliament. Under the new laws, unions can now negotiate multi-employer pay deals in an effort to secure wage increases across particular sectors such as child care and aged care. The law also aims to close the gender pay gap by prohibiting pay secrecy employment clauses and secures the right of workers to seek flexible working arrangements.[94]

Economy

Katy Gallagher, current Finance Minister

Jim Chalmers was sworn in as Treasurer of Australia and Katy Gallagher was sworn in as Finance Minister as part of the interim Albanese ministry. Treasurer Chalmers confirmed that the new government would hand down a revised budget in October 2022.[95] In the lead up to the October budget, Chalmers and Gallagher launched an audit to highlight any waste or rorts left behind by the previous government.[95]

Following the election, Albanese confirmed that his government would move forward with the stage three tax cuts which had been promised under the Morrison government.[95] Steven Kennedy has noted that the budget needs to be brought under control and that the tax system needs to be made fit for use.[96]

On 26 June 2022, Treasurer Jim Chalmers warned Australians that inflation will rise significantly.[97]

On 25 October 2022, Chalmers handed down a revised budget – the first under the Albanese government. The budget forecast that inflation would peak at 7.75% at the end of the year. The budget also took steps to fund the government's election promises largely by using funding earmarked by the former government which had not yet been spent.[98]

On 28 February 2023, the government announced that it would seek to cut tax concessions on superannuation accounts with more than $3m. It intends to legislate this term for a change to take effect in 2025.[99]

In May 2023, Chalmers handed down the Albanese government's second budget. The budget delivered a surplus of $22.1 billion (equivalent to 0.9% of Australia’s GDP), which was well above the government's forecasted surplus of $4.3 billion; this is Australia's first budget surplus in 15 years, and the largest ever Australian budget surplus.[100][101][102][103][104][105]

In January 2024, the government announced a restructuring of the stage three tax cuts, to give greater benefits to lower-income earners.[106] The Coalition criticised Albanese and the government for breaking a promise,[106] and initially suggested they would not support the legislation.[107] Opposition leader Peter Dutton called for an election over the change to stage three.[108] The Coalition supported the legislation in both houses.[109]

Parliamentary affairs

Tony Burke was appointed Leader of the House in the Albanese ministry.[110] Prior to being sworn in, Burke said that he was determined to ‘fix’ parliamentary procedures and noted that the situation had become farcical during the previous Parliament.[110] Burke confirmed in the first week of the Albanese government that he had already begun discussions to this end with the incoming crossbench including Independent MP Helen Haines.[110]

On 24 June 2022, Prime Minister Anthony Albanese decided to cut crossbench advisory staff from 4 to the pre-Coalition level of 1. This decision worsened the government's relations with crucial crossbenchers in the Senate, and will potentially make passing legislation in the Senate harder.[111] Many crossbench MPs and senators later had their staff allocations increased after making direct appeals to Albanese.[112]

On 7 July 2022, Albanese unveiled a new ministerial code of conduct which prohibited ministers from utilising blind trusts. This was in response to the blind trust used by Christian Porter under the previous government to fund personal defamation proceedings brought by him.[113]

On 26 August 2022, Albanese and Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus announced that the government had appointed former High Court Justice Virginia Bell to lead an inquiry into the appointment of former Prime Minister, the Hon Scott Morrison MP, to administer departments other than the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet and related matters".[114] Bell found that Morrison's appointments were corrosive of public trust in government and recommended the implementation of legislation requiring the public announcement of ministerial appointments.[115] Albanese confirmed that he would recommend that his cabinet implement all of Bell's recommendations in this regard[116] and Burke successfully moved a motion in the House censuring Morrison on 30 November 2022, making him the first former prime minister to be censured.[117]

On 9 February 2023, former Liberal Party cabinet minister Alan Tudge resigned from Parliament, triggering a by-election in his seat of Aston.[118] In a shock result, Labor's Mary Doyle won the by-election, marking the first time a governing party won a by-election against the opposition since 1920.[119] As a result of this, Albanese's government increased their majority in the House of Representatives to 78 seats.

Republic

Matt Thistlethwaite, current Assistant Minister for the Republic

Matt Thistlethwaite was appointed the first Assistant Minister for the Republic on 1 June 2022.

Thistlethwaite confirmed that the government's priority during its first term would be to seek constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians, but that a transition to a republic could be on the agenda for a potential second term.[120] Following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on 8 September 2022, Albanese reiterated that his government would not pursue becoming a republic during their first parliamentary term.[121]

Energy

Chris Bowen, current Minister for Climate Change and Energy

Chris Bowen was appointed Minister for Energy in the Albanese ministry. Shortly after the Albanese government came to office, Australia entered into an energy crisis marked by significantly increased power prices. Bowen convened a meeting with his state and territory counterparts on 8 June 2022. While it was agreed that there was no short-term solution to the current crisis, a plan was put in place to ensure the market is in a better position in the future. At the meeting, the ministers agreed to expedite work on a capacity mechanism which will require the energy regulator to pay retailers to maintain excess capacity. The ministers have also agreed to work on a national energy transition plan ahead of their next meeting in July 2022.[122]

On 9 December 2022, Albanese announced that National Cabinet had agreed to a plan put forward by the government to deal with rising energy prices by introducing gas and energy price caps. Albanese also announced that he would recall the Parliament to deal with the energy intervention bill before the end of the year.[123] The bill passed the Parliament on 15 December 2022. It introduced a 12-month cap on energy prices and a $1.5 billion relief package for households and businesses.[124]

Climate change

On 16 June 2022, Bowen and Albanese submitted a new Nationally Determined Contribution to the United Nations which formally committed Australia to reducing carbon emissions by 43% on 2005 levels. This represented an increase from the 26 to 28% target under the previous government.[125] These targets were also codified in legislation which the government passed with support from the Greens and crossbench senators.[126]

In July 2022, the Albanese government introduced a bill to exempt certain electric vehicles from fringe benefits tax. This passed Parliament in November 2022.[127][128]

In late 2022, the Albanese government announced reforms to the "safeguard mechanism", which requires Australia's largest carbon emitters to keep their emissions under a "baseline limit", either by reducing them, or by purchasing carbon credits. The scheme was introduced by the Turnbull government in 2016, but failed to reduce emissions as the rules were often left unenforced.[129] However, the amendments were met by opposition from the Australian Greens, whose support is crucial for the government in the Senate; Greens leader Adam Bandt argued that the reforms did not go far enough.[130] The two parties reached an agreement on 27 March, with the Greens negotiating a "hard cap" on emissions that cannot be offset by carbon credits.[131] The bill was passed on 30 March 2023, marking the most significant piece of climate change legislation passed through the Australian Parliament since 2011's Clean Energy Act.[132]

In March 2024, the Albanese government introduced a bill to apply a vehicle emission standard to new vehicles sold in Australia from 1 July 2025.[133] The Parliament passed this New Vehicle Effiency Standard in May 2024.[134]

Environment

Tanya Plibersek, current Minister for the Environment and Water, speaking in late 2013

Tanya Plibersek was appointed Minister for the Environment and Water.

Plibersek attended the UN ocean conference in Lisbon on 26 June 2022 where she announced five new blue carbon projects which are understood to include assistance for developing nations to safeguard the health of their oceans.[135]

On 19 July 2022, Plibersek released the State of the Environment Report which had been handed to the previous government in December 2021. The Report provided that every category of the Australian environment – apart from urban environments – was now in a poor and deteriorating state. In response, Plibersek announced that the government would adopt a new target of protecting 30% of the Australian environment and promised stronger environmental protection legislation to be introduced in 2023.[136]

On 8 December 2022, Plibersek announced that the government would commit to a reform of federal environmental laws, in response to an independent review first submitted to the Morrison government in 2020. The reform would include the creation of a federal Environment Protection Agency (EPA) which would impose legally binding environmental standards and oversee decision-making processes of the states and territories, as well as increased restrictions to native logging and the establishment of a "traffic light" rating system where some areas could be designated as having a high conservation value. The government planned to introduce legislation to Parliament before the end of 2023.[137]

Education

Jason Clare was appointed Minister for Education. On 17 June 2022, Clare confirmed that the Albanese government intends to make changes which give schools a choice of whether to hire a religious or secular pastoral care worker through the National School Chaplaincy Programme.[138]

Clare announced an Australian Universities Accord with the terms of reference covering funding, affordability, employment conditions for staff and how universities and TAFEs can work together. The Accord's final report is due to be handed down in December 2023.[139]

Housing

Julie Collins, current Minister for Housing

Julie Collins was appointed Minister for Housing.[140] The government's Regional First Home Buyer Guarantee was launched on 1 October 2022. The program provides a government guarantee of up to 15 per cent for eligible first home buyers, so regional Australians with a deposit of as little as 5 per cent can avoid paying lenders’ mortgage insurance.[141]

Welfare

The Albanese government announced that existing mutual obligation penalties would be wiped clean from people's records as the government transitioned to the Workforce Australia system for JobSeeker, saying that it was "too late" to scrap the system.[142] A review of the Workforce Australia JobSeeker scheme will be tabled in parliament in September 2023.[143]

Legislation to end the Cashless Debit Card was passed by the House of Representatives, and will be considered by the Senate in September.[144] Cashless Debit Card users in the Northern Territory will be transitioned back onto the BasicsCard, a Howard-era income management scheme,[145] despite Labor promising prior to the election to end compulsory income management.[146]

A Royal Commission into the Robodebt Scheme was announced by Albanese with Letters Patent issued on 25 August 2022. The Royal Commission will be chaired by former Queensland Supreme Court Justice Catherine Holmes and is expected to conclude on 18 April 2023.[147][148] The Albanese government agreed to all recommendations of the royal commission, either in full or in principle, but rejected a recommendation about the freedom of information act.[149]

Territory rights

Kristy McBain was appointed Minister for the Territories. She confirmed that the government would seek to introduce a bill likely in the first week of the new Parliament to give the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory the right to enact their own voluntary-assisted dying laws. However, she noted that the government had no plans to expand the number of senators representing the Australian Capital Territory despite its rapidly expanding population.[150]

The government's bill to empower the Territories to make laws relating to voluntary-assisted dying passed the Parliament on 1 December 2022.[151]

Health

Mark Butler was appointed Health Minister.

During the 2022 election campaign, Labor committed $135 million to fund 50 bulk-billed urgent care clinics, a policy designed to ease pressure on hospital emergency wards.[152] By the start of 2024, 58 clinics had opened across every state and territory of Australia.[153] Over the first six months of operation, more than 130,000 patients were treated for non-life-threatening medical emergencies.[154]

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

In October 2022, the government's cheaper medications bill passed the parliament. The new law reduced the cost of PBS medications by 29% and reduced the co-payment.[155]

COVID-19 pandemic

On 30 June 2022, Butler ordered an inquiry into Australia's COVID-19 vaccine supplies, future variant jabs and how the rollout was caught short at the height of the pandemic. The review will also examine the deals struck by the former government to purchase vaccines and therapeutic treatments.[156]

Pandemic leave payments and access to free rapid antigen tests for concession card holders expired on 1 July 2022. The new government initially did not take steps to extend these programs, but reinstated them on 16 July 2022.[157]

On 3 July 2022, Butler announced that from 12:01am on 6 July 2022 changes to the Biosecurity Act will come into effect which provide that persons seeking to visit Australia will no longer have to declare their COVID-19 vaccination status.[158]

On 7 July 2022, Butler confirmed that persons aged over 30 would be eligible to receive a fourth COVID-19 vaccine dose from 11 July 2022.[159]

The government altered rules governing isolation periods so that persons infected with the virus only need isolate for 5 days from 9 September 2022.[160] Albanese announced on 30 September that a mandatory isolation period would no longer apply at all for persons infected with COVID-19.[161]

2022 floods response

Following the 2022 New South Wales floods, the government announced one-off, non means tested disaster relief payments to persons living in 29 local government areas impacted by the disaster.[162]

On 12 July 2022, Albanese announced a further $80 million to assist with clean up efforts as well as grants for farmers, small businesses, not-for-profit organisations and local councils. Albanese also announced $36 million for a program to assess buildings and flooded properties including free demolition of those found to be unlivable.[163]

Following the 2022 south eastern Australia floods, the federal government made a one-off, non-means tested disaster recovery payment of $1,000 per eligible adult and $400 per eligible child available.[164] Across the states suffering in the crisis, 23 local government areas were made eligible.[165]

Aged care

The first bill to pass the new Parliament was one responding to the 17 recommendations of the Aged Care Royal Commission. The legislation amends the aged care funding model and introduces new reporting and transparency requirements.[166]

The government also introduced a bill in the first sitting of the new parliament seeking to implement it's election commitment to ensure that there is a nurse in nursing homes at all times. This bill was passed by the Parliament on 27 October 2022.[167]

The government entered submissions to the Fair Work Commission supporting the case for a wage increase in the aged care industry and committed to funding any such increase. The Commission ordered a 15% increase and the government is expected to enter submissions related to the timing and implementation of this.[168]

The government otherwise announced that further aged care reforms would be introduced in 2023.[166]

NDIS

Providers in the National Disability Insurance Scheme are being scrutinised for fraud, and a multiagency task force will be formed to look into this issue.[169]

Child care

In November 2022, the parliament passed the government's cheaper childcare laws. The new laws will commence operation in July 2023 and will see the childcare subsidy increased from 85% to 90% for families on an income below $80,000.[170]

Administrative Appeals Tribunal

On 16 December 2022, the Labor Albanese government announced that it will abolish the Administrative Appeals Tribunal AAT and replace it with a new body.[171]

Australia Day

On 18 January 2023, the Labor Albanese government removed a Morrison government ban on public servants working 26 January, Australia Day. The Liberal opposition criticised the move.[172][173]

On 16 December 2022, the Labor Albanese government removed a Morrison government policy of making local councils hold citizenship ceremonies on 26 January, Australia Day.[174][175][176]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The government's majority increased to 78 out of 151 seats following the Aston by-election in April 2023.

References

  1. ^ Brett Worthington (23 May 2022). "Anthony Albanese and four senior frontbenchers sworn in ahead of Quad trip". ABC News. Archived from the original on 22 May 2022. Retrieved 23 May 2022.
  2. ^ Rob McLennan (23 May 2022). "Marles in charge as Albo jets out". Bay 93.9. Archived from the original on 23 May 2022. Retrieved 23 May 2022.
  3. ^ "Documents relating to the calling of the 2022 Federal Election" (PDF). Governor-General of Australia. 10 April 2022. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 April 2022. Retrieved 11 April 2022.
  4. ^ "Proclamation – Prorogue the Parliament and dissolve the House of Representatives – 11 April 2022". Federal Register of Legislation. Australian Government. 11 April 2022. Archived from the original on 26 April 2022. Retrieved 12 April 2022.
  5. ^ "Here are the policies Labor campaigned on to win the election". ABC News. 21 May 2022. Archived from the original on 21 May 2022. Retrieved 22 May 2022.
  6. ^ Riga, Jessica (10 April 2022). "Prime Minister Scott Morrison announces May 21 election". ABC. Archived from the original on 9 April 2022. Retrieved 9 April 2022.
  7. ^ "With Anthony Albanese at the helm, Labor is projected to win 2022 federal election". ABC News. 22 May 2022. Archived from the original on 26 May 2022. Retrieved 22 May 2022.
  8. ^ "Live: Morrison calls Albanese to concede electoral defeat as Labor, independents unseat Coalition". ABC News. 21 May 2022. Archived from the original on 21 May 2022. Retrieved 21 May 2022.
  9. ^ Karvelas, Patricia (21 May 2022). "How Scott Morrison lost the election as Anthony Albanese triumphs in a sea of teal". ABC News. Archived from the original on 21 May 2022. Retrieved 21 May 2022.
  10. ^ Mayes, Andrea (21 May 2022). "Election 2022: WA sees huge swing away from the Liberals, with Swan, Pearce, Hasluck lost". ABC News. Archived from the original on 21 May 2022. Retrieved 21 May 2022.
  11. ^ Sandercock, Henry (22 May 2022). "Australia election 2022: who is Anthony Albanese? New Prime Minister to be sworn in as Scott Morrison concedes". National World. Archived from the original on 21 May 2022. Retrieved 22 May 2022.
  12. ^ Worthington, Brett (22 May 2022). "With Anthony Albanese at the helm, Labor is projected to win 2022 federal election". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 26 May 2022. Retrieved 22 May 2022.
  13. ^ "Albanese woos crossbench as insurance as he inches towards majority". Australian Financial Review. 23 May 2022. Archived from the original on 24 May 2022. Retrieved 28 May 2022.
  14. ^ "Prime Minister Anthony Albanese unveils his new cabinet". Nine News. 31 May 2022. Archived from the original on 31 May 2022. Retrieved 31 May 2022.
  15. ^ Shiloh Payne (1 June 2022). "Federal election live: New Labor ministry sworn in as vote counting winds down". ABC News. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
  16. ^ "Albanese mulls appointment of Canberra's most powerful bureaucrat". Australian Financial Review. 23 May 2022. Archived from the original on 30 May 2022. Retrieved 30 May 2022.
  17. ^ Giannini, Dominic (30 May 2022). "New head for prime minister's department". The Daily Advertiser. Archived from the original on 30 May 2022. Retrieved 30 May 2022.
  18. ^ Karp, Paul (29 September 2022). "Jayne Jagot appointed to Australia's high court, creating first majority-female bench". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 29 September 2022. Retrieved 29 September 2022.
  19. ^ "Stephen Smith named UK high commissioner as government flags fewer political appointments". the Guardian. 30 September 2022. Archived from the original on 8 February 2023. Retrieved 24 December 2022.
  20. ^ "Former Labor prime minister Kevin Rudd appointed ambassador to the US". the Guardian. 20 December 2022. Archived from the original on 14 June 2023. Retrieved 20 December 2022.
  21. ^ "Anthony Albanese pledges climate commitments while meeting with Quad leaders in Tokyo". ABC News. Archived from the original on 1 June 2022. Retrieved 26 May 2022.
  22. ^ Hurst, Daniel; Lyons, Kate; Movono, Lice (26 May 2022). "Penny Wong tells Pacific nations 'we have heard you' as Australia and China battle for influence". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 26 May 2022. Retrieved 26 May 2022.
  23. ^ "France ready to 'rebuild' relationship with Australia after tensions over submarine deal". SBS News. Archived from the original on 26 May 2022. Retrieved 27 May 2022.
  24. ^ Norman, Jane; Baker, Anne (6 June 2022). "Prime Minister Anthony Albanese seeks to reboot Australia's ties as he heads to Indonesia on first bilateral visit". ABC News. Archived from the original on 9 June 2022. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  25. ^ Davis, Miriah (6 June 2022). "PM Anthony Albanese and Indonesian President Joko Widodo enjoy symbolic bike ride ahead of bilateral meeting in Jakarta". Sky News Australia. Archived from the original on 9 June 2022. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  26. ^ Mann, Toby; Burrows, Ian (10 June 2022). "Anthony Albanese says New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's concerns around deportations need to be considered". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 10 June 2022. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  27. ^ Whyte, Anna (10 June 2022). "Ardern, Albanese to take trans-Tasman relationship 'to a new level'". 1 News. TVNZ. Archived from the original on 10 June 2022. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  28. ^ Fitzsimmons, James Massola, Chris Barrett, Caitlin (11 June 2022). "'An opportunity to join together': Albanese to meet Macron after paying $830m to cancel subs". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 10 August 2022. Retrieved 10 August 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  29. ^ Engels, Jorge; Kown, Jake; Ravindran, Jeevan (11 June 2022). "France commits to rebuilding relationship with Australia after failed submarine deal". CNN. Reuters. Archived from the original on 11 June 2022. Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  30. ^ "Australia agrees payout to end France submarine spat". Al Jazeera. 11 June 2022. Archived from the original on 11 June 2022. Retrieved 12 June 2022.
  31. ^ "Richard Marles's 'full and frank' meeting with China ends Australia's diplomatic freeze". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 12 June 2022. Retrieved 12 June 2022.
  32. ^ Sim, Dewey (11 June 2022). "China-Australia relations: Canberra says it values China trade ties, urges Beijing to be 'transparent' about military build-up". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 11 June 2022. Retrieved 12 June 2022.
  33. ^ Anthony Albanese [@AlboMP] (13 June 2022). "Wonderful to meet with Cook Islands Prime Minister Mark Brown this morning in Sydney. The Australian Government is keen to engage with the Pacific and chart a path forward as a partner of choice" (Tweet). Retrieved 24 June 2022 – via Twitter.
  34. ^ @RichardMarlesMP (15 June 2022). "I joined @KishiNobuo in Tokyo earlier today. Australia and Japan both recognise the critical importance of our bilateral defence relationship. A copy of our statement is available here" (Tweet). Retrieved 26 June 2022 – via Twitter.
  35. ^ @SenatorWong (17 June 2022). "Thank you Prime Minister Sogavare for our constructive meeting today. Australia deeply values our partnership with Solomon Islands. I look forward to strengthening our cooperation as we work together to face shared challenges & achieve shared goals, including on climate change" (Tweet). Retrieved 26 June 2022 – via Twitter.
  36. ^ "Australia values Vietnam's partnership regional role". Archived from the original on 27 June 2022. Retrieved 28 June 2022.
  37. ^ Penny Wong [@SenatorWong] (28 June 2022). "I was born in Malaysia and it is an honour to be visiting now as Australia's Foreign Minister. I had a warm and productive meeting with my counterpart, @saifuddinabd, where we discussed a range of issues of shared interest. I look forward to welcoming him to Australia soon" (Tweet). Retrieved 29 June 2022 – via Twitter.
  38. ^ Anthony Albanese [@AlboMP] (28 June 2022). "An honour to be welcomed by Spanish Prime Minister Pedros Sánchez in Madrid today. Our discussion covered the NATO Summit, getting momentum back into a trade agreement between Europe and Australia, and the need to act on climate change" (Tweet). Retrieved 28 June 2022 – via Twitter.
  39. ^ Butler, Josh (23 June 2022). "Albanese to meet Macron in Paris for 'important reset' of Australia's relationship with France". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 24 June 2022. Retrieved 24 June 2022.
  40. ^ Ikonomou, Tess (30 June 2022). "PM targets France after NATO Summit". The Canberra Times. Archived from the original on 30 June 2022. Retrieved 30 June 2022.
  41. ^ Harris, Rob (4 July 2022). "Albanese promises Zelensky new $100m aid package during Kyiv meeting". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 3 July 2022. Retrieved 4 July 2022.
  42. ^ Packham, Ben (4 July 2022). "Anthony Albanese's visit to Ukraine met with warmth and sadness by locals suffering Russia's war". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 5 June 2023. Retrieved 5 July 2022.
  43. ^ Rudd, Kevin (21 November 2021). "Despite breaking the freeze with China, Australia still has formidable work ahead to mend relations". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 21 November 2022. Retrieved 1 December 2021.
  44. ^ Slade, Lucy; Wood, Richard (2 December 2022). "Finnish PM visits Australia for first time, discusses shared values". Nine News. Archived from the original on 2 December 2022. Retrieved 3 December 2022.
  45. ^ Huitson, Joseph (2 December 2022). "'Warm and productive relationship': Anthony Albanese hosts Finnish Prime Minister Sanna Marin at Kirribilli House". Sky News Australia. Archived from the original on 2 December 2022. Retrieved 3 December 2022.
  46. ^ Hemi, Tema (7 February 2023). "Hipkins, Albanese discuss 501s in first meeting in Canberra". Te Ao Māori News. Māori Television. Archived from the original on 8 February 2023. Retrieved 8 February 2023.
  47. ^ hevesi, Bryant (7 February 2023). "Anthony Albanese meets with Chris Hipkins in Canberra: Australia, New Zealand PMs discuss citizenship issues and deportations". Sky News Australia. Archived from the original on 7 February 2023. Retrieved 8 February 2023.
  48. ^ Dziedzic, Stephen; Sas, Nick (10 November 2023). "Tuvalu residents able to resettle in Australia as climate change 'threatens its existence'". Radio New Zealand. Archived from the original on 11 November 2023. Retrieved 15 November 2023.
  49. ^ Hurst, Daniel; Butler, Josh (10 November 2023). "Australia to offer residency to Tuvalu citizens displaced by climate change". Archived from the original on 14 November 2023. Retrieved 15 November 2023.
  50. ^ "AUKUS: Australian officials to brief New Zealand govt on Pillar Two this year". Radio New Zealand. 1 February 2024. Archived from the original on 1 February 2024. Retrieved 2 February 2024.
  51. ^ Corlett, Eva (2 February 2024). "New Zealand steps up interest in Aukus as Pacific security concerns grow". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2 February 2024. Retrieved 2 February 2024.
  52. ^ Howes, Stephen (16 May 2024). "2024 Australian aid spending and effectiveness update". RNZ. Archived from the original on 20 May 2024. Retrieved 27 May 2024.
  53. ^ "Prime Minister Albanese's victory speech brings hope for First Nations Peoples' role in democracy". theconversation.com. 22 May 2022. Archived from the original on 26 May 2022. Retrieved 26 May 2022.
  54. ^ Butler, Josh (23 May 2022). "Anthony Albanese sweeps into the prime ministership, makes a symbolic gesture, then jets off to Japan". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 26 May 2022. Retrieved 26 May 2022.
  55. ^ Mahony, Jack (28 July 2022). "Senate President Sue Lines no longer wants the Lord's Prayer read before each sitting day in Parliament". Sky News Australia. Archived from the original on 28 July 2022. Retrieved 28 July 2022.
  56. ^ Clun, Rachel (23 May 2022). "Election 2022 results: Linda Burney says Labor committed to Indigenous Voice to Parliament". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 26 May 2022. Retrieved 26 May 2022.
  57. ^ "After more than 200 years of waiting, Albanese puts forward a 'simple' proposition for an Indigenous Voice to Parliament". ABC News. 29 July 2022. Archived from the original on 29 July 2022. Retrieved 30 July 2022.
  58. ^ Taylor, Anthony Galloway, Andrew (27 August 2022). "'He is a big figure': Albanese wins celebrity endorsement from Shaq for Indigenous Voice to parliament". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 27 August 2022. Retrieved 27 August 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  59. ^ "PM, state and territory leaders formally back Indigenous voice to parliament with statement of intent". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 3 February 2023. Retrieved 3 February 2023.
  60. ^ "Referendum 2023". Australian Electoral Commission. Archived from the original on 19 October 2023. Retrieved 12 October 2023.
  61. ^ "Indigenous Voice to Parliament Referendum". abc.net.au. 15 October 2023. Archived from the original on 16 October 2023. Retrieved 15 October 2023.
  62. ^ a b "Eight priorities for Anthony Albanese's new Labor government". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 25 May 2022. Retrieved 26 May 2022.
  63. ^ Visentin, Lisa (24 May 2022). "Pocock urges Labor to back independent MP's anti-corruption model". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 26 May 2022. Retrieved 26 May 2022.
  64. ^ Karp, Paul (8 June 2022). "Albanese government promises national corruption watchdog will have power to investigate pork-barrelling". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 12 June 2022. Retrieved 13 June 2022.
  65. ^ "Long-awaited federal anti-corruption commission legislation introduced to parliament". ABC News. Archived from the original on 8 October 2022. Retrieved 8 October 2022.
  66. ^ "National Anti-Corruption Commission clears final hurdle, passes House of Representatives". ABC News. Archived from the original on 30 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.
  67. ^ Visentin, Lisa (7 July 2022). "Mark Dreyfus orders Commonwealth to drop Bernard Collaery East Timor spying charges". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 7 July 2022. Retrieved 7 July 2022.
  68. ^ "Who we are, our-Ministers". Archived from the original on 10 July 2020. Retrieved 27 June 2022.
  69. ^ "Murugappan Family". jimchalmers.org. Archived from the original on 27 May 2022. Retrieved 27 May 2022.
  70. ^ Clun, David Crowe, Angus Thompson, Rachel (2 September 2022). "Albanese government will increase permanent migration to record 195,000". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 2 December 2022. Retrieved 2 December 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  71. ^ "Australia's migration future". minister.homeaffairs.gov.au. Archived from the original on 14 December 2022. Retrieved 22 December 2022.
  72. ^ "Australia raises permanent migration cap to 195,000 to ease workforce shortages". the Guardian. 2 September 2022. Archived from the original on 2 December 2022. Retrieved 2 December 2022.
  73. ^ "What's behind the recent surge in Australia's net migration – and will it last?". 5 April 2023. Archived from the original on 22 May 2023. Retrieved 22 May 2023.
  74. ^ "Mayors demand meeting with PM over ISIS wives' repatriation". www.9news.com.au. 9 November 2022. Archived from the original on 2 December 2022. Retrieved 2 December 2022.
  75. ^ "Western Sydney 'betrayed' by repatriation". The West Australian. 3 November 2022. Archived from the original on 2 December 2022. Retrieved 2 December 2022.
  76. ^ Graham-McLay, Charlotte (1 February 2023). "New Zealand PM welcomes change to Australia's 'corrosive' deportation policy". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2 February 2023. Retrieved 3 February 2023.
  77. ^ Cropper, Emma (31 January 2023). "Exclusive: Australia signs off on major change to visa cancellations for 501 deportees". Newshub. Archived from the original on 1 February 2023. Retrieved 3 February 2023.
  78. ^ Hendry-Tennant, Ireland (1 February 2023). "Australia's change to visa cancellations for 501 deportees doesn't go far enough, advocate says". Newshub. Archived from the original on 2 February 2023. Retrieved 3 February 2023.
  79. ^ "Direct pathway to Australian citizenship for New Zealanders". Prime Minister of Australia. 22 April 2023. Archived from the original on 22 April 2023. Retrieved 23 April 2023.
  80. ^ a b Neilson, Michael (22 April 2023). "New Zealanders in Australia to get pathway to citizenship; PM Hipkins says biggest improvement in rights 'in a generation'". The New Zealand Herald. Archived from the original on 22 April 2023. Retrieved 23 April 2023.
  81. ^ "'A blimmin' good day for Kiwis living in Australia' - Hipkins on citizenship changes". Radio New Zealand. 22 April 2023. Archived from the original on 22 April 2023. Retrieved 23 April 2023.
  82. ^ Karp, Paul (20 December 2022). "Labor to allow 19,000 refugees to stay permanently in Australia from early 2023". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 22 May 2023. Retrieved 22 May 2023.
  83. ^ "Convicted terrorist Abdul Nacer Benbrika wins High Court bid to restore his Australian citizenship". ABC News. 31 October 2023. Archived from the original on 13 November 2023. Retrieved 14 November 2023.
  84. ^ Karp, Paul (8 November 2023). "Indefinite immigration detention ruled unlawful in landmark Australian high court decision". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 14 November 2023. Retrieved 14 November 2023.
  85. ^ Karp, Paul (9 November 2023). "Australia to immediately begin releasing people held in indefinite immigration detention". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 14 November 2023. Retrieved 14 November 2023.
  86. ^ Karp, Paul (12 November 2023). "Eighty people already freed from Australia's immigration detention since landmark high court ruling". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 14 November 2023. Retrieved 14 November 2023.
  87. ^ Karp, Paul (19 March 2024). "More than 170 immigration detainees could be freed if Australian government loses high court challenge". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 31 March 2024.
  88. ^ Karp, Paul (26 March 2024). "Hundreds of unlawful non-citizens face jail if they refuse to cooperate in deportation from Australia". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 31 March 2024.
  89. ^ "Rules to ease for foreign students who want to call Australia home". 29 January 2024. Archived from the original on 31 January 2024. Retrieved 31 January 2024.
  90. ^ "Albanese govt lodges wage rise submission". PerthNow. 27 May 2022. Archived from the original on 27 May 2022. Retrieved 27 May 2022.
  91. ^ "Labor formally submits for minimum pay rise of at least 5.1 per cent to Fair Work Commission". ABC News. Archived from the original on 3 June 2022. Retrieved 3 June 2022.
  92. ^ "Australian minimum wage increased by 5.2 per cent in Fair Work Commission decision". ABC News. Archived from the original on 15 June 2022. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  93. ^ "Passage of 'Respect@Work' Bill is a major step in preventing harassment". humanrights.gov.au. 28 November 2022. Archived from the original on 30 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.
  94. ^ "Labor gets its workplace changes through in the nick of time after late-night Senate sitting". ABC News. December 2022. Archived from the original on 2 December 2022. Retrieved 2 December 2022.
  95. ^ a b c Hurst, Daniel (28 May 2022). "Anthony Albanese vows to 'keep it real' as he seeks good rapport with crossbench". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 29 May 2022. Retrieved 29 May 2022.
  96. ^ Grattan, Michelle. "Grattan on Friday: If the Albanese government did what really needs to be done, it would be a very big target". The Conversation. Archived from the original on 9 June 2022. Retrieved 9 June 2022.
  97. ^ "Inflation to rise significantly treasurer Jim Chalmers warns". Archived from the original on 26 June 2022. Retrieved 26 June 2022.
  98. ^ Martin, Peter (25 October 2022). "Jim Chalmers' 2022–23 budget mantra: whatever you do, don't fuel inflation". The Conversation. Archived from the original on 30 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.
  99. ^ Karp, Paul (28 February 2023). "Albanese government lifts tax rate on superannuation balances over $3m". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 1 March 2023. Retrieved 1 March 2023.
  100. ^ McGuirk, Rod (22 September 2023). "Australia's government posts $14.2 billion budget surplus after 15 years in the red". Associated Press. Archived from the original on 3 January 2024. Retrieved 3 January 2024.
  101. ^ Roberts, Georgia (21 September 2023). "Government reveals $22 billion budget surplus in final outcome figures". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 3 January 2024. Retrieved 3 January 2024.
  102. ^ Vidler, Adam (22 September 2023). "'Biggest surplus ever': Chalmers announces $100 billion budget turnaround". Nine News. Nine Network. Archived from the original on 3 January 2024. Retrieved 3 January 2024.
  103. ^ "Australia posts first budget surplus in 15 years as tax revenues soar". Reuters. Archived from the original on 30 September 2023. Retrieved 3 January 2024.
  104. ^ Karp, Paul (21 September 2023). "Budget surplus up to $22bn thanks to strong jobs market and higher commodities prices". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 3 January 2024. Retrieved 3 January 2024.
  105. ^ Clun, Rachel (21 September 2023). "Record $22b surplus to come from 'war and inflation'". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 3 January 2024. Retrieved 3 January 2024.
  106. ^ a b Hegarty, Nicole (30 January 2024). "Greens cite PBO analysis showing reshaped stage 3 tax cuts still favour highest earners". ABC News. Archived from the original on 5 February 2024. Retrieved 5 February 2024.
  107. ^ Karp, Paul (24 January 2024). "Sussan Ley retreats from comments suggesting Coalition would repeal Labor's stage-three tax cut changes". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  108. ^ Karp, Paul; Butler, Josh (25 January 2024). "Peter Dutton calls for election over 'very significant change' to stage-three tax cuts". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 15 February 2024. Retrieved 15 February 2024.
  109. ^ Karp, Paul; Butler, Josh (6 February 2024). "Stage-three tax cuts: Labor's changes to pass parliament with Coalition support". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  110. ^ a b c "Tony Burke vows to 'fix' parliament as crossbench demands reform". the Guardian. 24 May 2022. Archived from the original on 29 May 2022. Retrieved 29 May 2022.
  111. ^ "slap in the face independents furious at pms decision to cut advisory staff from four to one". TheGuardian.com. 24 June 2022. Archived from the original on 26 June 2022. Retrieved 26 June 2022.
  112. ^ "One Nation senators and David Pocock granted second adviser amid backlash over crossbench staff cuts". the Guardian. 22 July 2022. Archived from the original on 10 August 2022. Retrieved 10 August 2022.
  113. ^ "Labor's new ministerial code of conduct bans blind trusts like Christian Porter used". the Guardian. 7 July 2022. Archived from the original on 9 July 2022. Retrieved 10 July 2022.
  114. ^ Dreyfus, Mark (26 August 2022). "Establishment of Inquiry into the appointment of The Hon Scott Morrison MP to multiple departments". Attorney-General. Archived from the original on 27 August 2022. Retrieved 27 August 2022.
  115. ^ Bell, Virginia (25 November 2022). "Report of the Inquiry into the Appointment of the Former Prime Minister to Administer Multiple Departments". Archived from the original on 20 October 2023. Retrieved 25 November 2022.
  116. ^ Massola, James (25 November 2022). "Albanese cabinet to decide if Morrison will be censured over damning secret ministry report". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 30 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.
  117. ^ Evans, Jake (29 November 2022). "Scott Morrison censured over secret ministries, as former prime minister decries reprimand as 'political intimidation'". ABC News. Archived from the original on 30 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.
  118. ^ "Liberal Alan Tudge quits politics, Josh Frydenberg rules out comeback". ABC News. 9 February 2023. Archived from the original on 11 April 2023. Retrieved 9 February 2023.
  119. ^ Smethurst, Annika; Galloway, Anthony; Cunningham, Melissa (1 April 2023). "Labor secures historic upset in Aston, 'worst byelection result in 100 years' for Liberals". The Age. Archived from the original on 8 April 2023. Retrieved 11 April 2023.
  120. ^ "Time to start 'serious conversation' about becoming a republic after Queen Elizabeth dies, government says". ABC News. 2 June 2022. Archived from the original on 25 June 2022. Retrieved 25 June 2022.
  121. ^ Karp, Paul (11 September 2022). "Albanese says 'inappropriate' to discuss republic now but doesn't rule out future referendum". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 12 September 2022. Retrieved 12 September 2022.
  122. ^ Morse, Dana (8 June 2022). "Chris Bowen backs renewables and storage as energy ministers agree on plan to fill supply gap". ABC News. Archived from the original on 12 June 2022. Retrieved 13 June 2022.
  123. ^ Hitch, Georgia (11 December 2022). "Energy relief bill to face contest in parliament, Albanese confident it will be passed". ABC News. Archived from the original on 13 December 2022. Retrieved 13 December 2022.
  124. ^ "Parliament passes government's plan to cap coal and gas prices — as it happened". ABC News. 14 December 2022. Archived from the original on 15 December 2022. Retrieved 15 December 2022.
  125. ^ "'Cleaner, cheaper energy': Anthony Albanese submits more ambitious 2030 emissions target to UN". SBS News. Archived from the original on 18 June 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  126. ^ "Australian parliament passes first climate change legislation in a decade". the Guardian. 8 September 2022. Archived from the original on 6 December 2022. Retrieved 1 December 2022.
  127. ^ "Electric cars and the fringe benefits tax exemption: All you need to know". Drive. 7 February 2023. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  128. ^ "Electric car FBT bill passes both houses". RSM Australia. 30 November 2022. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  129. ^ Morton, Adam (17 February 2023). "Safeguard mechanism: what is it, will it cut emissions and what role do carbon offsets play?". Guardian Australia. Archived from the original on 19 February 2023. Retrieved 19 February 2023.
  130. ^ Crowe, David (14 February 2023). "Greens set up fresh Senate clash with call for ban on new coal and gas". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 14 February 2023. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  131. ^ Worthington, Brett (27 March 2023). "Climate deal struck after Labor and the Greens reach safeguard mechanism agreement". ABC News. Archived from the original on 27 March 2023. Retrieved 28 March 2023.
  132. ^ Morton, Adam (30 March 2023). "Australia passes most significant climate law in a decade amid concern over fossil fuel exports". Guardian Australia. Archived from the original on 31 March 2023. Retrieved 1 April 2023.
  133. ^ Visontay, Elias; Butler, Josh (26 March 2024). "Labor unveils watered-down fuel efficiency standard that eases emission rules for large SUVs". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2 June 2024.
  134. ^ "Government passes emissions laws for new vehicles after Greens deal". ABC News. 16 May 2024. Retrieved 2 June 2024.
  135. ^ "Tanya Plibersek declares environment 'is back front and centre' in Australia at UN ocean conference". the Guardian. 27 June 2022. Archived from the original on 27 June 2022. Retrieved 27 June 2022.
  136. ^ Slezak, Michael (19 June 2022). "Majority of Australia's environment in 'poor' state as Labor blames the Coalition for decade of'inaction and wilful ignorance'". ABC News. Archived from the original on 18 July 2022. Retrieved 19 July 2022.
  137. ^ Slezak, Michael (9 December 2022). "Government to establish federal environmental protection agency in major overhaul of Australia's environmental laws". ABC News (Australia). Archived from the original on 9 December 2022. Retrieved 9 December 2022.
  138. ^ Karp, Paul (17 June 2022). "Labor confirms it will allow schools to hire secular workers under chaplaincy program". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 18 June 2022. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  139. ^ "The universities accord could see the most significant changes to Australian unis in a generation". theconversation.com. 16 November 2022. Archived from the original on 1 December 2022. Retrieved 1 December 2022.
  140. ^ "Julie Collins". Archived from the original on 27 June 2022. Retrieved 27 June 2022.
  141. ^ "Albanese Government housing agenda already delivering for Australians | Treasury Ministers". ministers.treasury.gov.au. 2 November 2022. Archived from the original on 30 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.
  142. ^ "Existing mutual obligation penalties wiped as Labor unveils changes to new jobseeker program". SBS News. Archived from the original on 30 June 2022. Retrieved 30 June 2022.
  143. ^ "Government flags possible reform of $7b jobseeker program a month after launching it". ABC News. 2 August 2022. Archived from the original on 13 August 2022. Retrieved 13 August 2022.
  144. ^ "Income management up in the air as federal government looks to scrap cashless welfare". ABC News. 8 August 2022. Archived from the original on 11 August 2022. Retrieved 12 August 2022.
  145. ^ Klein, Elise. "Has Labor learnt from the failure of the cashless debit card?". The Conversation. Archived from the original on 12 August 2022. Retrieved 12 August 2022.
  146. ^ "Labor pledges to scrap compulsory income management". ABC News. 20 April 2022. Archived from the original on 12 August 2022. Retrieved 12 August 2022.
  147. ^ "Robodebt royal commission established to investigate almost $2 billion in unlawful debt claims". ABC News. 25 August 2022. Archived from the original on 25 August 2022. Retrieved 25 August 2022.
  148. ^ "Explained: A Robodebt royal commission has been announced. What can we expect next?". www.9news.com.au. 25 August 2022. Archived from the original on 26 August 2022. Retrieved 27 August 2022.
  149. ^ Kelly, Cait (13 November 2023). "Robodebt royal commission: Labor accepts all 56 recommendations in full or in principle". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 14 November 2023. Retrieved 14 November 2023.
  150. ^ "Albanese government to move to grant territories right to set own voluntary assisted dying laws". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 1 July 2022. Retrieved 2 July 2022.
  151. ^ "Territory governments regain right to make assisted dying laws after Senate vote". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 1 December 2022. Retrieved 1 December 2022.
  152. ^ "Labor to commit $135m to trial 50 urgent care clinics intended to ease pressure on hospitals". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 12 April 2022. Retrieved 13 April 2022.
  153. ^ "All Medicare Urgent Care Clinics open across the country". Department of Health and Aged Care. Archived from the original on 30 January 2024. Retrieved 2 January 2024.
  154. ^ "Over 130,000 Medicare Urgent Care Clinic presentations". Department of Health and Aged Care. Archived from the original on 30 January 2024. Retrieved 9 January 2024.
  155. ^ readOctober 27, Ewa StaszewskaDigital Reporterless than 2 min; 2022 – 3:33pm (27 October 2022). "Labor reveals cheaper medicines win". skynews. Archived from the original on 16 December 2022. Retrieved 16 December 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  156. ^ Massola, James (30 June 2022). "Australia COVID: Mark Butler orders vaccine inquiry over government purchasing". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 1 July 2022. Retrieved 2 July 2022.
  157. ^ "COVID-19 Australia updates LIVE: Anthony Albanese to reinstate pandemic leave payments". Australian Financial Review. 16 July 2022. Archived from the original on 30 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.
  158. ^ Massola, James (3 July 2022). "COVID vaccine requirement to be scrapped for international arrivals". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 3 July 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  159. ^ "Australians as young as 30 to receive fourth dose". The Canberra Times. 7 July 2022. Archived from the original on 7 July 2022. Retrieved 7 July 2022.
  160. ^ "COVID-19 isolation slashed, but support payments remain up in the air". The Canberra Times. 31 August 2022. Archived from the original on 30 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.
  161. ^ readSeptember 30, Bryant HevesiDigital Reporter2 min; 2022 – 12:39pm (30 September 2022). "Major change to Australia's COVID-19 isolation rules". skynews. Archived from the original on 30 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  162. ^ "Disaster Payments Available for More NSW Flood-impacted Residents". Prime Minister of Australia. Archived from the original on 9 July 2022. Retrieved 10 July 2022.
  163. ^ "Flooding: Joint government funding announced for NSW flood victims". Nine News. Archived from the original on 12 July 2022. Retrieved 13 July 2022.
  164. ^ "Victoria's flood crisis 'far from over', with Shepparton inundated and Echuca on high alert". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 16 October 2022. Archived from the original on 16 October 2022. Retrieved 16 October 2022.
  165. ^ "ADF called in to help flood-hit Victoria". Yahoo! News Australia. 16 October 2022. Archived from the original on 16 October 2022. Retrieved 16 October 2022.
  166. ^ a b Giannini, Dominic (2 August 2022). "Aged care law first to pass new parliament". The Canberra Times. Archived from the original on 2 August 2022. Retrieved 2 August 2022.
  167. ^ "Passage of amended Aged Care Bill welcomed – Law Council of Australia". www.lawcouncil.asn.au. Archived from the original on 1 December 2022. Retrieved 1 December 2022.
  168. ^ "Australia's aged care workers win 15% pay rise and minister says it's the 'first step'". the Guardian. 4 November 2022. Archived from the original on 14 December 2022. Retrieved 14 December 2022.
  169. ^ Dickinson, Helen (16 August 2022). "NDIS fraud reports reveal the scheme's weakest points". The Conversation. Archived from the original on 20 August 2022. Retrieved 20 August 2022.
  170. ^ "'Cheaper' childcare laws pass through Parliament". Nine News. Archived from the original on 13 March 2023. Retrieved 13 March 2023.
  171. ^ Osborne, Paul (16 December 2022). "Government to axe administrative tribunal". The West Australian. Archived from the original on 16 December 2022. Retrieved 16 December 2022.
  172. ^ Butler, Josh (18 January 2023). "Labor overturns Morrison-era ban on public servants working Australia Day". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 27 January 2023. Retrieved 27 January 2023.
  173. ^ Rabe, Angus Thompson, Tom (18 January 2023). "Hundreds of thousands told they can 'swap the date' and work Australia Day". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 27 January 2023. Retrieved 27 January 2023.((cite web)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  174. ^ "Labor scraps rule that forced local councils to hold citizenship ceremonies on Australia Day". SBS News. Archived from the original on 10 January 2023. Retrieved 27 January 2023.
  175. ^ Massola, Rachael Dexter, James (16 December 2022). "End of Australia Day citizenship edict spurs more councils to reconsider the date". The Age. Archived from the original on 27 January 2023. Retrieved 27 January 2023.((cite web)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  176. ^ Butler, Josh (16 December 2022). "Labor reverses Coalition ban on councils holding citizenship ceremonies outside Australia Day". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 27 January 2023. Retrieved 27 January 2023.
{{bottomLinkPreText}} {{bottomLinkText}}
Albanese government
Listen to this article

This browser is not supported by Wikiwand :(
Wikiwand requires a browser with modern capabilities in order to provide you with the best reading experience.
Please download and use one of the following browsers:

This article was just edited, click to reload
This article has been deleted on Wikipedia (Why?)

Back to homepage

Please click Add in the dialog above
Please click Allow in the top-left corner,
then click Install Now in the dialog
Please click Open in the download dialog,
then click Install
Please click the "Downloads" icon in the Safari toolbar, open the first download in the list,
then click Install
{{::$root.activation.text}}

Install Wikiwand

Install on Chrome Install on Firefox
Don't forget to rate us

Tell your friends about Wikiwand!

Gmail Facebook Twitter Link

Enjoying Wikiwand?

Tell your friends and spread the love:
Share on Gmail Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Buffer

Our magic isn't perfect

You can help our automatic cover photo selection by reporting an unsuitable photo.

This photo is visually disturbing This photo is not a good choice

Thank you for helping!


Your input will affect cover photo selection, along with input from other users.

X

Get ready for Wikiwand 2.0 🎉! the new version arrives on September 1st! Don't want to wait?