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Adam Sol

Adam Sol
BornNew York City, U.S.
OccupationPoet
NationalityCanadian-American
EducationTufts University
Indiana University Bloomington (MFA)
University of Cincinnati (PhD)
SpouseRabbi Yael Splansky
Children3

Adam Sol is a Canadian-American poet.

Life

Adam Sol was born in New York City and raised in New Fairfield, Connecticut. He graduated from Tufts University, from Indiana University Bloomington with an M.F.A, and from the University of Cincinnati with a Ph.D.[1] He lives in Toronto[2] with his wife, Rabbi Yael Splansky, and their three sons.

Work

Sol published his first book of poems, Jonah's Promise in 2000, with MidList Press. His second collection, Crowd of Sounds, won the Trillium Prize for Poetry in 2004. His third collection, Jeremiah Ohio, was published by House of Anansi Press in 2008. His fourth, Complicity, was published by McClelland & Stewart in 2014. [3]

Next, Sol put his teaching skills to work through his popular poetry blog "How a Poem Moves." The best of this blog was later compiled into a 2019 book, recommended by CBC.[4]

Sol's most recent book, Broken Dawn Blessings, was the 2022 winner of the Canadian Jewish Literary Award for Poetry. [5]

Sol also has an extensive professorial career, having taught at Laurentian University, York University, and Wilfrid Laurier University. He currently holds the Blake C. Goldring Chair of the Arts and Society at the University of Toronto's Victoria College.[6]

Awards

Works

Poetry

  • Jonah's promise: poems. Mid-List Press. 2000. ISBN 978-0-922811-47-2.
  • Crowd of Sounds. House of Anansi Press. 2003. ISBN 978-0-88784-688-5.
  • Jeremiah, Ohio. House of Anansi Press. 2008. ISBN 978-0-88784-791-2.
  • Complicity. McClelland & Stewart. 2014. ISBN 978077107927-6.
  • Broken Dawn Blessings: Poems. ECW Press. 2021. ISBN 978177041606-2.

Non-fiction

  • How a Poem Moves: A Field Guide for Readers of Poetry. ECW Press. 2019. ISBN 9781770414563.
  • Balancing acts: the re-invention of ethnicity in Jewish American fiction before 1930. University of Cincinnati. 2000.

References

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Adam Sol
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