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1976 Democratic Party presidential primaries

1976 Democratic Party presidential primaries

← 1972 January 27 to June 8, 1976 1980 →

3,010 delegates to the 1976 Democratic National Convention
1,506 (majority) votes needed to win
  Jimmy Carter official portrait as Governor
Candidate Jimmy Carter Jerry Brown George Wallace
Home state Georgia California Alabama
Delegate count 2,239 301 57
Contests won 30 3 3
Popular vote 6,235,609 2,449,374 1,955,388
Percentage 39.2% 15.4% 12.3%

 
Candidate Mo Udall Henry M. Jackson Frank Church
Home state Arizona Washington Idaho
Delegate count 330 10 19
Contests won 3 4 5
Popular vote 1,611,754 1,134,375 830,818
Percentage 10.1% 7.1% 5.2%

First place finishes by convention roll call

     Carter      Brown      Wallace

     Udall      Jackson      Church      Humphrey

Previous Democratic nominee

George McGovern

Democratic nominee

Jimmy Carter

From January 27 to June 8, 1976, voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for president in the 1976 United States presidential election. Former Georgia governor Jimmy Carter was selected as the nominee through a series of primary elections and caucuses culminating in the 1976 Democratic National Convention held from July 12 to July 15, 1976, in New York City.

Background

1972 election

In 1972, Senator George McGovern seized the Democratic nomination through an early campaign and superior organization, aided by his inside knowledge of the reforms under a commission he chaired. McGovern, widely seen as an extremely liberal candidate, lost the general election in an historic landslide to incumbent Richard Nixon, carrying only the state of Massachusetts.

Watergate scandal

During the 1972 campaign, several men were arrested for a break-in at the Watergate complex, home of the Democratic National Committee headquarters. As the investigation continued, it became clear that the break-in was one of several tactics utilized by the Nixon campaign against their political opponents. The scandal and the subsequent attempt to cover it up eventually forced President Nixon to resign from office under political pressure and the threat of impeachment. Nixon was succeeded by Gerald Ford, whom he had appointed to the Vice Presidency after Spiro Agnew himself resigned under investigation for bribery.

As a result of the Watergate scandal and other scandals, the American withdrawal from Vietnam, and an ongoing economic recession, the Democratic Party won a major landslide in the 1974 midterm elections. The post-Watergate political environment also led to a tightening of campaign finance regulations, the creation of the Church Committee to investigate abuses by federal intelligence agencies, and a general opposition to Washington and establishment politicians.

Pre-campaign maneuvering

Much of the speculation for the 1976 nomination surrounded Senator Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota, formerly Vice President of the United States and the party's nominee in 1968. Humphrey had won the largest number of votes in the 1972 primaries but lost in a bitter fight with McGovern. Though Humphrey ultimately declined to seek the nomination again, many early votes went to uncommitted delegates who supporters hoped would commit to Humphrey by the time of the convention.

Senator Scoop Jackson raised his national profile by speaking out on Soviet Union–United States relations and Middle East policy regularly, and was considered a front-runner for the nomination when he announced the start of his campaign in February 1975. Jackson received substantial financial support from Jewish-Americans who admired his pro-Israel views, but Jackson's support of the Vietnam War resulted in hostility from the left wing of the Democratic Party.

Jackson chose to run on social issues, emphasizing law and order and his opposition to busing. Jackson was also hoping for support from labor, but the possibility that Hubert Humphrey might enter the race caused unions to offer only lukewarm support.[1][2][3][4]

The 1976 campaign was the first presidential campaign in which the primary system was dominant.[citation needed] However, most of the Democratic candidates failed to realize the significance of the increased number of primaries, or the importance of creating momentum by winning the early contests. Jimmy Carter, who was virtually unknown at the national level, leveraged his obscurity to run as an "outsider" to Washington. Carter's plan was to run in all of the primaries and caucuses, beginning with the Iowa caucuses, and build up momentum by winning "somewhere" each time primary elections were held.

Schedule and results

Tablemaker's Note:[a]

Date Total pledged
delegates
Contest
and total popular vote
Delegates won and popular vote
Other(s)
Unpledged
January 19 0 (of 47) Iowa
Caucuses
39,039
10,764
(27.57%)
- 2,340
(5.99%)
- 5,148
(13.19%)
- - 3,861
(9.89%)
- 429
(1.10%)
- 1,287
(3.30%)
- - - - - 15,210[b]
(38.96%)
January 24 0 (of 24) Mississippi
Caucuses[c][5]
1,482.13 CDs
203.96 CDs
(13.76%)
- - 661.36 CDs
(44.62%)
- 23.16 CDs
(1.56%)
- 15.61 CDs
(1.05%)
- - - 177.87 CDs
(12.00%)
- - - - - 400.17 CDs
(27.00%)
February 7 0 (of 37) Oklahoma
Caucuses[d][6]
7,186 CDs
1,323 CDs
(18.41%)
- - 756 CDs
(10.52%)
- 900 CDs
(12.52%)
- 1,187 CDs
(16.51%)
- - - - - - - - - 2,882 CDs[e]
(40.11%)
February 14 0 (of 24) Mississippi
County Conventions[f][7]
400 SDs
40.6 SDs
(10.15%)
- - 174.3 SDs
(43.58%)
- - - 3 SDs
(0.75%)
- - - 37.8 SDs
(9.45%)
- - - - - 100 [g]SDs
(25.00%)
February 21 19 (of 24) Mississippi
District Conventions[8]
4 Del. - - 9 Del. - - - - - - - 3 Del. - - - - - 3 Del. [h]
February 24 0 (of 65) Minnesota
Caucuses[9]
- - - - - - - - - [i] - - - - - - - - 3 Del. [j]
17 (of 17) New Hampshire
Primary[10]
82,381
15 Del.
23,373
(27.57%)
- 2 Del.
18,710
(22.71%)
1,061 WI
(1.29%)
12,510
(15.19%)
- - 8,863
(10.76%)
4,596 WI
(5.58%)
1,857 WI
(2.25%)
- 6,743
(8.19%)
1,007
(1.22%)
53
(0.06%)
- - - 3,608[k]
(4.38%)
March 2 104 (of 104) Massachusetts
Primary[11]
735,825
16 Del.
101,948
(13.86%)
- 20 Del.
130,440
(17.73%)
21 Del.
123,112
(16.73%)
1 Del.
34,963
(4.75%)
- - 6 Del.
55,701
(7.57%)
7,851 WI
(1.07%)
30 Del.
164,393
(22.34%)
1 Del.
21,693
(2.95%)
8 Del.
53,252
(7.24%)
1 Del.
25,772
(3.50%)
- - - - 15,985[l]
(4.38%)
0 (of 12) Vermont
Primary[12]
38,714
16,335
(42.19%)
- 1,235 WI
(3.19%)
916 WI
(2.37%)
- - - 4,893
(12.64%)
- - - 10,699
(27.64%)
3,324
(8.59%)
- - - - 1,312[m]
(3.39%)
0 (of 53) Washington
Caucuses[n][13]
2,676 SDs
28 SDs
(1.05%)
1 SD
(0.04%)
162 SDs
(6.05%)
39 SDs
(1.46%)
- - 2 SDs
(0.07%)
11 SDs
(0.41%)
19 SDs
(0.71%)
2,090 SDs
(78.10%)
- - - - - - - 324 SDs[o]
(12.11%)
March 9 81 (of 81) Florida
Primary[14]
1,300,330
34 Del.
448,844
(34.52%)
- 27,235
(2.09%)
26 Del.
396,820
(30.52%)
8,750
(0.67%)
- 4,906
(0.38%)
5,397
(0.42%)
- 21 Del.
310,944
(23.91%)
32,198
(2.48%)
7,084
(0.55%)
7,595
(0.58%)
- 5,042
(0.39%)
- - 45,515[p]
(3.50%)
March 16 0 (of 169) Illinois
Pres. Primary[15][16]
1,311,914
630,915
(48.09%)
- - 361,798
(27.58%)
- - - 98,862
(7.54%)
- - - 214,024
(16.31%)
- - - - - 6,315 [q]
(0.48%)
155 (of 169) Illinois
Del. Primary[r][17][18]
?
53 Del.
?
(?%)
- ?
(?%)
3 Del.
?
(?%)
?
(?%)
?
(?%)
- ?
(?%)
6 Del.
?
(?%)
?
(?%)
- - - - - - - 107 Del.
? [s]
(?%)
March 20 28 (of 37) Oklahoma
District Conventions[t][19]
?
9 Del. - - - - - - 5 Del. - - - - - - - - - 15 Del.[u]
(40.00%)
March 23 61 (of 61) North Carolina
Primary[20]
604,832
36 Del.
324,437
(53.64%)
- 14,032
(2.32%)
25 Del.
210,166
(34.75%)
- 1,675
(0.28%)
- 5,923
(0.98%)
- 25,749
(4.26%)
- - - - - - - 22,850 [v]
(3.78%)
March 31 31 (of 31) South Carolina
District Conventions[w][21]
9 Del. - - 8 Del. - - 1 Del. - - - - - - - - - - 13 Del.[x]
April 3 0 (of 34) Kansas
County Conventions[y][22]
664 SDs
232 SDs
(34.95%)
- 29 SDs
(4.37%)
3 SDs
(0.45%)
- - 2 SDs
(0.30%)
13 SDs
(1.96%)
- 43 SDs
(6.48%)
- - - - - - - 286 SDs[z]
(43.07%)
9 (of 37) Oklahoma
State Convention[23]
728 SDs
4 Del.
300 SDs
(41.21%)
- - - - - - 2 Del.
145 SDs
(19.92%)
- - - - - - - - - 3 Del.
283 SDs[aa]
(38.87%)
0 (of 54) Virginia
County Conventions[ab][24]
3,040 SDs
655 SDs
(21.55%)
- 88 SDs
(2.89%)
69 SDs
(2.27%)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,350 SDs[ac]
(44.41%)
April 4 22 (of 22) Puerto Rico
Caucus [ad][25][26]
9 Del. - - - - - - - - 12 Del. - - - - - - - 1 Del.
April 6 274 (of 274) New York
Del. Primary[ae][27][28]
35 Del. - 72 Del. - - - - - 16 Del. 102 Del. - - - - - - - 49 Del.[af]
68 (of 68) Wisconsin
Primary[29][30]
740,528
26 Del.
271,220
(36.63%)
- 25 Del.
263,771
(35.62%)
10 Del.
92,460
(12.49%)
1,255
(0.17%)
1,730
(0.23%)
- 8,185
(1.11%)
- 6 Del.
47,605
(6.43%)
596
(0.08%)
5,097
(0.69%)
1 Del.
26,982
(3.64%)
- - - - 21,627 [ag]
(2.92%)
April 10 40 (of 47) Iowa
District Conventions[31][32]
3,431
17 Del. - 10 Del. - - - - 2 Del. - - - - - - - - - 11 Del.[ah]
April 21 0 (of 71) Missouri
County Conventions[33][34]
839 SDs
112 SDs
(13.35%)
2 SDs
(0.24%)
28 SDs
(3.34%)
18 SDs
(2.15%)
- - - 2 SDs
(0.24%)
18 SDs
(2.15%)
18 SDs
(2.15%)
- - 21 SDs
(2.50%)
- - - - 589 SDs[ai]
(70.20%)
April 23 10 (of 10) Alaska
State Convention[35]
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 10 Del.[aj]
April 24 30 (of 65) Minnesota
District Conventions[ak][36]
- - - - - - - - 23 Del. - - - - - - - - 7 Del.[al]
April 26 25 (of 25) Arizona
Caucuses[37]
26,703
4 Del.
2,704
(10.13%)
- 20 Del.
19,074
(71.43%)
1 Del.
1,793
(6.72%)
- - 391
(1.46%)
96
(0.36%)
- 1,495
(5.60%)
- - 318
(1.19%)
- - - - 832[am]
(3.12%)
April 27 171[an] (of 178) Pennsylvania
Primary[38][39]
1,311,914
64 Del.
511,905
(36.95%)
- 22 Del
.259,166
(18.71%)
3 Del.
155,902
(11.25%)
15,320
(1.11%)
- - 13,067
(0.94%)
12,859 WI
(0.93%)
19 Del.
340,340
(24.57%)
17 Del.
32,947
(2.38%)
- 38,800
(2.80%)
- - - - 46 Del. [ao]
5,093 [ap]
(0.37%)
May 1 32 (of 41) Louisiana
Del. Primary[40][41]
10 Del. - - 7 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - 15 Del.[aq]
98 (of 98) Texas
Primary[42]
1,545,068
92 Del.
736,161
(47.65%)
- - 270,798
(17.53%)
- 6 Del.
343,032
(22.20%)
- 31,379
(2.03%)
- - - 28,520
(1.85%)
5,700
(0.37%)
- - - - 129,478 [ar]
(8.38%)
May 2 19 (of 65) Minnesota
District Conventions[as][43]
- - - - - - - - 15 Del. - - - - - - - - 4 Del.[at]
May 4 27 (of 35) Alabama
Del. Primary[44][au]
- - - 12 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 Del.
50 (of 50) Georgia
Primary[45]
502,471
50 Del.
419,272
(83.44%)
- 9,755
(1.94%)
57,594
(11.46%)
824
(0.16%)
277
(0.06%)
2,477
(0.49%)
699
(0.14%)
- 3,358
(0.67%)
181
(0.04%)
1,378
(0.27%)
635
(0.13%)
- 3,628
(0.72%)
- - 2,393 [av]
(0.48%)
69 (of 69) Indiana
Primary[46]
614,389
48 Del.
417,480
(67.95%)
- - 93,121
(15.16%)
- - - - - 72,080
(11.73%)
- - 31,708
(5.16%)
- - - - 21 Del.[aw]
13 (of 13) Washington D.C.
Primary[47][48]
33,291
4 Del.
10,521
(31.60%)
- 4 Del.
6,999
(21.02%)
- - - - 461
(1.39%)
- - - - - - - 4 Del.
10,149
(30.49%)
1 Del.
5,161
(15.50%)
-
May 8 9 (of 41) Louisiana
Del. Primary[49]
3 Del. - - 2 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4 Del.[ax]
7 (of 7) Wyoming
State Convention[50]
1 Del. 1 Del. 1 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4 Del.[ay]
May 9 20 (of 20) Maine
State Convention[51]
9 Del. - 5 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6 Del.
May 11 0 (of 51) Connecticut
Primary[52]
106,803
35,415
(33.16%)
- 32,959
(30.86%)
- - - - 178
(0.17%)
- 18,962
(17.75%)
- - 5,515
(5.16%)
- - - - 13,774[az]
(12.90%)
0 (of 71) Missouri
County Conventions[53][ba]
156 SDs
47 SDs
(30.13%)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 101 SDs
(64.74%)
23 (of 23) Nebraska
Primary[54]
175,013
8 Del.
65,833
(37.62%)
- 4,688
(2.68%)
5,567
(3.18%)
407
(0.23%)
- 15 Del.
67,297
(38.45%)
811
(0.46%)
12,685
(7.25%)
2,642
(1.51%)
- 384
(0.22%)
6,033
(3.45%)
- - - - 8,666[bb]
(4.95%)
33 (of 33) West Virginia
Primary[55]
372,577
- - - 40,938
(10.99%)
- - - - - - - - - - 331,639
(89.01%)
- - 33 Del.[bc]
May 15 18 (of 18) New Mexico
State Convention[56]
8 Del. - 6 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4 Del.
May 17 17 (of 17) Utah
Caucus[57]
74,405
4 Del. - - - - - 5 Del. - - - - - - - - - - 9 Del.[bd]
May 18 53 (of 53) Maryland
Primary[58]
32 Del.
219,404
(37.08%)
286,672
(48.45%)
7 Del.
32,790
(5.54%)
24,176
(4.09%)
- - - 6,841
(1.16%)
- 10 Del.
13,956
(2.36%)
- - 7,907
(1.34%)
- - - - 4 Del.[be]
133 (of 133) Michigan
Primary[59]
708,666
69 Del.
307,559
(43.40%)
- 58 Del.
305,134
(43.06%)
2 Del.
49,204
(6.94%)
- - - 4,081
(0.58%)
- 10,332
(1.46%)
- - 7,623
(1.08%)
- - - - 4 Del.[bf]
18,995[bg]
(2.68%)
May 22 12 (of 12) Vermont
State Convention[60]
3 Del. 2 Del. 3 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4 Del.[bh]
54 (of 54) Virginia
District Conventions[61]
23 Del. - 7 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 24 Del.
40 (of 53) Washington
District Conventions[62]
- - 5 Del. - - - - - - 24 Del. - - - - - - - 11 Del.
May 25 27 (of 35) Alabama
Del. Primary[63][bi]
2 Del. - - 4 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 Del.
26 (of 26) Arkansas
Primary[64]
501,764
17 Del.
314,277
(62.63%)
- 1 Del.
37,783
(7.53%)
5 Del.
83,005
(16.54%)
- - - - - 9,554
(1.90%)
- - - - - - - 3 Del.
57,145
(11.39%)
16 (of 16) Idaho
Primary[65]
74,405
2 Del.
8,818
(11.85%)
1,453 WI
(1.95%)
981
(1.32%)
1,115
(1.50%)
- - 14 Del.
58,570
(78.72%)
319
(0.43%)
1,700
(2.29%)
485
(0.65%)
- - - - - - - 964[bj]
(1.30%)
46 (of 46) Kentucky
Primary[66]
306,006
37 Del.
181,690
(59.38%)
- 2 Del.
33,262
(10.87%)
7 Del.
51,540
(16.84%)
- - - - - 8,186
(2.68%)
- - 17,061
(5.58%)
- - - - 14,267[bk]
(4.66%)
54 (of 71) Missouri
District Conventions[67]
28 Del. - 3 Del. - - - - - - 1 Del. - - 1 Del. - - - - 21 Del.
11 (of 11) Nevada
Primary[68]
75,242
3 Del.
17,567
(23.35%)
6 Del.
39,671
(52.73%)
2,237
(2.97%)
2,490
(3.31%)
- - 1 Del.
6,778
(9.01%)
- - 1,896
(2.52%)
- - - - - - - 1 Del.
4,603[bl]
(6.12%)
34 (of 34) Oregon
Primary[69]
432,632
12 Del.
115,310
(26.65%)
7 Del.
106,812 WI
(24.69%)
11,747
(2.72%)
5,797
(1.34%)
743
(0.17%)
- 15 Del.
145,394
(33.61%)
- 22,488
(5.20%)
5,298
(1.23%)
- 3,753
(0.87%)
- - - - - 13,946[bm]
(3.22%)
46 (of 46) Tennessee
Primary[70]
334,078
36 Del.
259,243
(77.60%)
1,556 WI
(0.47%)
12,420
(3.72%)
1 Del.
36,495
(10.92%)
- - 8,026
(2.40%)
1,628
(0.49%)
109 WI
(0.03%)
5,672
(1.70%)
507
(0.15%)
- 1,782
(0.53%)
- - - - 9 Del.[bn]
6,640[bo]
(1.99%)
May 29 7 (of 45) Iowa
State Convention[71]
3 Del. - 2 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 Del.[bp]
May 30 17 (of 17) Hawaii
State Convention[72]
- - 1 Del. - - - - - - 1 Del. - - - - - - - 15 Del.[bq]
June 1 17 (of 17) Montana
Primary[73]
106,841
4 Del.
26,329
(24.64%)
- 6,708
(6.28%)
3,680
(3.44%)
- - 11 Del.
63,448
(59.39%)
- - 2,856
(2.67%)
- - - - - - - 2 Del.
3,820[br]
(3.58%)
22 (of 22) Rhode Island
Primary[74]
60,348
7 Del.
18,237
(30.22%)
- 2,543
(4.21%)
507
(0.84%)
247
(0.41%)
- 6 Del.
16,423
(27.21%)
- - 756
(1.25%)
132
(0.22%)
- 2,468
(4.09%)
- - - - 9 Del.
19,035[bs]
(31.54%)
17 (of 17) South Dakota
Primary[75]
58,671
9 Del.
24,186
(41.22%)
- 7 Del.
19,510
(33.25%)
1,412
(2.41%)
- - - 573
(0.98%)
- 558
(0.95%)
- - 4,561
(7.77%)
- - - - 1 Del.
7,871[bt]
(13.42%)
June 6 16 (of 65) Minnesota
State Convention[76]
- - - - - - - - 13 Del. - - - - - - - - 3 Del.[bu]
June 8 300 (of 300) California
Primary[77]
3,409,701
67 Del.
697,092
(20.44%)
204 Del.
2,013,210
(59.04%)
2 Del.
171,501
(5.03%)
102,292
(3.00%)
- - 7 Del.
250,581
(7.35%)
- - 38,634
(1.13%)
- - - - - - - 78,595[bv]
(2.31%)
0 (of 108) New Jersey
Pres. Primary[78]
360,839
210,655
(58.38%)
- - 31,183
(8.64%)
- - 49,034
(13.59%)
- - 31,820
(8.82%)
- - 21,774
(6.03%)
- - - - 16,373
(4.54%)
108 (of 108) New Jersey
Del. Primary[79]
462,859
25 Del.
129,455
(27.97%)
- 59,365
(12.83%)
28,944
(6.25%)
- - 30,722
(6.64%)
- - - - - 19,700
(4.26%)
- - - - 83 Del.
194,673[bw]
(42.06%)
152 (of 152) Ohio
Primary[80]
1,134,374
126 Del.
593,130
(52.29%)
- 20 Del.
240,342
(21.19%)
63,953
(5.64%)
- - 157,884
(13.92%)
- - 35,404
(3.12%)
- - - - - - - 6 Del.[bx]
43,661[by]
(3.85%)
June 11 12 (of 12) Delaware
District Conventions[81]
10 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 Del.
June 12 51 (of 51) Connecticut
District Conventions[82]
19 Del. - 16 Del. - - - - - - 8 Del. - - - - - - - 8 Del.
13 (of 53) Washington
State Convention[83]
- - 2 Del. - - - - - - 8 Del. - - - - - - - 3 Del.
June 25 35 (of 35) Colorado
District Conventions[84]
10 Del. 5 Del. 4 Del. - - - 3 Del. - - - - - - - - - - 9 Del.
June 26 35 (of 35) Colorado
State Convention[85]
2 Del. 1 Del. 1 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
13 (of 13) North Dakota
State Convention[86]
7 Del. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6 Del.
Total
3,008 pledged delegates
17,697,105 votes
1,130
7,020,624
(39.67%)
226
2,449,374
(13.84%)
328
1,667,362
(9.42%)
146
2,268,895
(12.82%)
1
80,167
(0.45%)
6
346,714
(1.96%)
78
831,209
(4.70%)
15
251,818
(1.42%)
75
62,288
(0.35%)
242
1,153,766
(6.52%)
18
88,254
(0.50%)
11
332,221
(1.88%)
3
216,565
(1.22%)
0
53
(0.00%)
0
340,309
(1.92%)
4
10,149
(0.06%)
1
5,161
(0.03%)
593
578,573
(3.27%)
  1. ^ This should not be taken as a finalized list of results. While a significant amount of research was done, there were a number of Delegates who were not bound by the instruction, or "Pledged" to a candidate, and to simplify the data these delegates were considered "Uncommitted". Many states also held primaries for the delegate positions, and these on occasion were where slates or candidates pledge to a certain candidate might be elected; however, as these elections allowed for a single person to vote for multiple candidates, as many as the number of positions being filled, it is difficult to determine how many people actually voted in these primaries. For this reason, while the results of some are in the table, they are not included in the popular vote summaries at the bottom of the table.
  2. ^ Includes 14,508 votes for Unpledged slate of Delegates at (37.16%).
  3. ^ Only half the vote was accounted for in those sources found.
  4. ^ Though nearly complete, still a partial result.
  5. ^ Almost all are Uncommitted. There were 74 additional CDs for other candidates at (1.02%)
  6. ^ This is a partial result from 70 of Mississippi's 82 counties.
  7. ^ Represents Uncommitted
  8. ^ Represents Uncommitted
  9. ^ No results were released, but sampling showed that (~50%) of those who attended favored Humphrey
  10. ^ Represents Uncommitted
  11. ^ Includes 875 Write-In votes for Ronald Reagan at (1.06%), 828 votes for Arthur Blessit at (1.01%), and 405 Write-In votes for Gerald Ford at (0.49%)
  12. ^ Includes 9,803 Write-In votes for "None of the Above" at (1.33%), and 1,623 Write-In votes for Senator Edward Kennedy at (0.22%).
  13. ^ Scattering.
  14. ^ These are partial results; only 2,780 precincts of 6,100 were accounted for here.
  15. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  16. ^ Includes 37,626 votes for "No Preference" at (2.89%), and 7,889 votes for Arthur Blessit at (0.61%).
  17. ^ Scattering.
  18. ^ The Delegate vote is not currently known.
  19. ^ The Uncommitted Delegates here represent a number of different camps. The largest with 85 delegates was controlled Chicago Mayor Richard Daley, who had used Senator Adlai Stevenson III as a stand-in. 18 truly uncommitted delegates were divided into two camps, one led by congressman Paul Simon and the other by state treasurer Alan Dixon, both inclined to supporting Hubert Humphrey's potential entrance into the race. The final 4 were pledged to Governor Daniel Walker, who had been engaged in a number of power struggles with Richard Daley..
  20. ^ Only Delegate results are known.
  21. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  22. ^ All 22,850 votes for "No Preference".
  23. ^ Only Delegate results are known.
  24. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  25. ^ Only Delegate results are known. Returns from 28 counties with 56 delegates are not accounted for.
  26. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  27. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  28. ^ Only Delegate results are known. Returns from 28 counties with 56 delegates are not accounted for.
  29. ^ All are Uncommitted but 9.
  30. ^ The Caucus was initially held in two phases due to fighting which distrupted the first round on February 22, resulting in a second round being held on this date. However, supporters of Carter opted to not participate in the second round, initially allowing Jackson supporters to win the remainder of the delegates. To head off a dispute before the Convention, a compromise was reached in which the delegation would be divided as shown below.
  31. ^ The situation in New York is complicated in that the rather than voting for the candidates themselves, voters were instead voting for the individual delegates; it wasn't uncommon for the allegiance of some of these delegates to be ill-defined.
  32. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  33. ^ Includes 7,154 votes for "None of the Names Shown" at (0.97%), and 14,473 Write-In votes at (1.95%); the Write-Ins were not broken down on the State level.
  34. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  35. ^ Includes 547 for Uncommitted, and 42 for other candidates or undetermined
  36. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  37. ^ Only five of eight districts held conventions on this date.
  38. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  39. ^ Includes 797 votes for Uncommitted Delegates at (2.99%).
  40. ^ Technically none of the delegates were apportioned based on the Presidential Primary; 134 of Pennsylvania's 178 delegates delegates were elected in a separate series of primaries held concurrently, with 44 apportioned based on the number of delegate to each candidate based on the number of delegate contests won.
  41. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  42. ^ Scattered Write-Ins.
  43. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  44. ^ All for "Uncommitted".
  45. ^ Remaining three of eight districts that hadn't held conventions back in April.
  46. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  47. ^ As majorities were required, run-offs were held later (May 25th) in those delegate primaries that only resulted in a plurality. No vote totals were given.
  48. ^ Scattering.
  49. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  50. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  51. ^ All are "Uncommitted".
  52. ^ All for "Uncommitted".
  53. ^ These are counties that did not hold their County Conventions on April 21st.
  54. ^ Includes 7,199 votes for Senator Ted Kennedy and 1,467 scattered Write-Ins.
  55. ^ By law the delegates were Uncommitted, regardless of the result of the primary.
  56. ^ All are "Uncommitted".
  57. ^ All are "Uncommitted".
  58. ^ All are "Uncommitted".
  59. ^ 15,853 votes are for "Uncommitted" at (2.24%), and there are 3,142 Write-In votes at (0.44%).
  60. ^ All are "Uncommitted".
  61. ^ These were run-offs for those races on May 4th in which a majority was not reached.
  62. ^ All for "None of the Names Shown".
  63. ^ Includes 11,962 votes for an Uncommitted slate at (3.91%).
  64. ^ All votes for "None of the Above".
  65. ^ Includes 10,983 votes for Senator Ted Kennedy at (2.54%), 1,389 Write-In votes for Ronald Reagan at (0.32%), and 691 Write-In votes for Gerald Ford at (0.16%).
  66. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  67. ^ Includes 11,962 votes for an Uncommitted slate at (1.84%).
  68. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  69. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  70. ^ All votes are for "No Preference".
  71. ^ All votes are for an Uncommitted slate.
  72. ^ All votes are for "No Preference".
  73. ^ All are Uncommitted.
  74. ^ All votes for an Uncommitted slate.
  75. ^ All votes for an Uncommitted slate.
  76. ^ All are pledged to Mayor Carl Stokes.
  77. ^ All votes are for Ohio State Treasurer Gertrude Donahey.

Candidates

Nominee

Candidate Most recent office Home state Campaign

Withdrawal date

Popular vote Contests won Running mate Ref.
Jimmy Carter Governor of Georgia
(1971–1975)
Georgia (US State)
Georgia

(CampaignPositions)
Secured nomination:
July 15, 1976
6,235,609
(39.19%)
30
ME, NH, VT, CT, RI, NJ, DE, PA, VA, NC, FL, GA, TN, KY, OH, MI, IL, IN, WI, IA, LA, AR, MO, TX, OK, KS, CO, NM, SD, DC
Walter Mondale [87]

Eliminated at convention

Candidate Most recent office Home state Campaign

Withdrawal date

Popular vote Contests won Ref.
Jerry Brown Governor of California
(1975–1983; 2011–2019)
California
California

Declared: March 16, 1976
2,449,374
(15.4%)
3
CA, MD, NV
[87]
George Wallace Governor of Alabama
(1963–1967; 1971–1979; 1983–1987)
Alabama
Alabama

Declared: November 1, 1975
1,955,388
(13.76%)
3
AL, MS, SC
[87]
Mo Udall U.S. Representative
for Arizona's 2nd congressional district
(1961–1991)

Arizona

Declared: November 23, 1974
1,611,754
(10.13%)
3
AZ, HI, WY
[87]
Ellen McCormack Chair of the New York Right to Life Party
(1970–1976)
New York (state)
New York
238,027
(1.50%)
None [87]

Withdrew before convention

Candidate Most recent office Home state Campaign

Withdrawal date

Popular vote Contests won Ref.
Frank Church U.S. Senator from Idaho

(1957–1981)

Idaho
Idaho

Announced campaign: March 18, 1976
Withdrew: June 14, 1976 (endorsed Carter)
830,818
(5.22%)
5
ID, MT, NE, OR, UT
[87]
Henry M. Jackson U.S. Senator from Washington
(1953–1983)
Washington (state)
Washington
Declared: February 1, 1975
Withdrew: May 1, 1976
1,134,375
(7.13%)
4
AK, MA, NY, WA
[87]
Sargent Shriver Democratic nominee
for Vice President of the United States in 1972
Maryland
Maryland

Declared: September 20, 1975
Withdrew: March 16, 1976
304,399
(1.91%)
None [87]
Fred Harris U.S. Senator from Oklahoma
(1964–1973)

Oklahoma

Declared: January 11, 1975
Withdrew: April 2, 1976
234,568
(1.47%)
None [87]
Milton Shapp Governor of Pennsylvania
(1971–1979)
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania

Declared: September 25, 1975
Withdrew: April 27, 1976
88,254
(0.56%)
None [87]
Birch Bayh U.S. Senator from Indiana
(1963–1981)
Indiana
Indiana
Declared: October 21, 1975
Withdrew: March 4, 1976
86,438
(0.54%)
None [87]
Lloyd Bentsen U.S. Senator from Texas
(1971–1993)
Texas
Texas

Declared: February 17, 1975
Withdrew: May 1, 1976
4,046
(0.03%)
None [87]
Terry Sanford Governor of North Carolina
(1961–1965)
North Carolina
North Carolina
Declared: June 1, 1975
Withdrew: January 25, 1976
404
(0.00%)
None [87]

Favorite son candidates

The following candidates ran only in their home state or district's delegate elections for the purpose of controlling those delegates at the national convention:

Declined to run

At multiple times during the primaries, Humphrey hinted at a campaign for the nomination and expressed his willingness to be drafted, but ultimately declined to actively seek the nomination on April 29, after Carter's victory in Pennsylvania. Several unsuccessful draft movements were formed and many uncommitted delegates expressed their preference for Humphrey.[citation needed]

Polling

National polling

Before August 1974

Poll source Publication Sample size
Birch Bayh
Scoop Jackson
Ted Kennedy
George McGovern
Edmund Muskie
Adlai Stevenson III
George Wallace
Other
Undecided
Gallup[89] July 14, 1973 659 A 4% 40% 8% 9% 3% 16% 16%[a] 9%
Gallup Nov. 2–5, 1973 627 3% 6% 41% 6% 9% 4% 15% 6%[b] 10%
5% 9% 16% 17% 7% 20% 12%[c] 14%
Gallup Feb. 22–March 4, 1974 677 2% 8% 44% 7% 7% 2% 17% 5%[d] 6%
3% 11% 49% 8% 10% 5% 7%[e] 7%
3% 13% 20% 13% 7% 26% 8%[f] 10%
  1. ^ Hubert Humphrey with 8%, John Lindsay with 2%, Sargent Shriver with 2%, and Reubin Askew, Walter Mondale, William Proxmire, and John Tunney with 1% each
  2. ^ Walter Mondale and William Proxmire with 2% each, and Robert Byrd and John Tunney with 1% each
  3. ^ William Proxmire with 4%, Walter Mondale and John Tunney with 3% each, and Robert Byrd with 2%
  4. ^ Walter Mondale with 2% and William Proxmire, John Tunney, and Robert Byrd with 1% each
  5. ^ Walter Mondale with 2%, William Proxmire with 2%, John Tunney with 2%, and Robert Byrd with 1%
  6. ^ Walter Mondale with 3%, John Tunney and William Proxmire with 2% each, and Robert Byrd with 1%

August 1974–January 1976

Poll source Publication Sample size
Birch Bayh
Jimmy Carter
Hubert Humphrey
Scoop Jackson
Ted Kennedy
George McGovern
Edmund Muskie
Sargent Shriver
George Wallace
Other
Undecided
Gallup[90] Sept. 27, 1974 ? 9% 46% 6% 8% 16% 8%[a] 7%
14% 17% 17% 28% 14%[b] 11%
Gallup[91] Dec. 5, 1974 ? 2% 11% 10% 6% 6% 1% 19% 30%[c] 15%
Gallup[92] March 31, 1975 ? 16% 13% 10% 9% 22% 21%[d] 9%
Gallup[93] May 2–5, 1975 675 9% 6% 36% 2% 4% 15% 28%[d]
Gallup[94] Aug. 7, 1975 ? 9% 6% 42% 5% 6% 15% 17%[d]
20% 10% 11% 10% 2% 23% 12%[d] 12%
Gallup[95][96] Oct. 26, 1975 ? 13% 11% 35% 4% 5% 4% 14% 9%[d] 8%
23% 11% 9% 9% 8% 20% 9%[d] 9%
Gallup[97] Nov. 21–24, 1975 622 4% 2% 21% 6% 29% 8% 4% 15% 11%[d]
5% 30% 10% 10% 7% 4% 20% 14%[d]
Gallup[98] Jan. 2–5, 1976 ? 4% 20% 6% 32% 5% 4% 15% 9%[d]
5% 29% 9% 10% 6% 5% 20% 16%[d]
  1. ^ William Proxmire with 3%, Eugene McCarthy with 3%, and Walter Mondale with 2%
  2. ^ Eugene McCarthy with 7%, William Proxmire with 5%, and Walter Mondale with 2%
  3. ^ John Lindsay with 3%, Julian Bond with 3%, Adlai Stevenson III with 3%, Ralph Nader with 2%, Walter Mondale with 2%, Lloyd Bentsen with 2%, Jerry Brown with 2%, John Glenn with 2%; Reubin Askew, John Tunney, William Proxmire, Dale Bumpers, Robert Byrd, Hugh Carey, Thomas Eagleton, Eugene McCarthy, Gary Hart, Ella Grasso, and Milton Shapp with 1% each; and Brendan Byrne, Terry Sanford, Frank Church, Mo Udall, and Kevin White with <1% each
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Gallup did not break down results for other candidates individually.

1976

Poll source Publication
Jerry Brown
Jimmy Carter
Frank Church
Hubert Humphrey
Scoop Jackson
Sargent Shriver
George Wallace
Gallup Jan. 1976 4% 2% 27% 6% 6% 22%
Gallup Mar. 1976 26% 27% 15% 3% 15%
Gallup Mar. 1976 28% 30% 11% 3% 16%
Gallup Mar. 1976 9% 29% 3% 30% 7% 13%
Gallup Apr. 1976 6% 28% 2% 31% 8% 13%
Gallup May 1976 6% 39% 4% 30% 4% 9%
Gallup May 1976 15% 36% 4% 28% 9%
Gallup June 1976 15% 53% 3% 13% 7%

Head-to-head polling

Kennedy v. Wallace

Poll source Publication Sample size
Ted Kennedy
George Wallace
Undecided
Gallup[89] July 14, 1973 659 A 71% 22% 7%
Gallup[99] May 2–5, 1975 676 69% 24% 7%

Kennedy v. Muskie

Poll source Publication Sample size
Ted Kennedy
Edmund Muskie
Undecided
Gallup[89] July 14, 1973 659 A 64% 26% 10%
Gallup[99] May 2–5, 1975 676 70% 22% 8%

Kennedy v. Jackson

Poll source Publication Sample size
Ted Kennedy
Scoop Jackson
Undecided
Gallup[99] May 2–5, 1975 676 70% 23% 7%

Timeline

Nominee
Ended campaigns
Iowa caucuses
Massachusetts primary
Pennsylvania primary
Convention 1976

January 19: Iowa caucuses

With no clear front-runner for the nomination and a political climate that seemed tilted heavily in their party's favor, a record number of Democrats competed for their party's presidential nomination.

Jimmy Carter startled many political experts by finishing second in the Iowa caucuses, behind only "uncommitted" delegates largely elected on the backs of minor candidates and Humphrey supporters. Arizona Congressman Morris Udall, who had been leading in the polls at one point, came in fifth behind former Oklahoma Senator Fred R. Harris, leading Harris to coin the term "winnowed in", referring to his surprisingly strong showing.[100][101][102][103]

February 24: New Hampshire primary

The New Hampshire primary was another victory for Carter, albeit one in which he was the lone moderate or conservative candidate in the field, both Jackson and Wallace choosing to bypass New Hampshire in favor of neighboring Massachusetts. Thus, with the liberal vote split, Carter won. The New Hampshire primary nevertheless had symbolic value for the Carter campaign, showing that a Southerner could appeal in New England in advance of the Massachusetts primary. Among the liberal candidates in New Hampshire, Udall emerged as the leader.

March 2: Massachusetts primary

One week after the New Hampshire primary, Carter's campaign was dealt a serious blow in Massachusetts. With Jackson and Wallace joining the field to split moderate and conservative voters, Carter finished fourth, behind Jackson, Wallace, and Udall. None of the candidates campaigned heavily in the state, preferring to advertise on television. Jackson won the race by relying on experienced political activists, especially in Boston, and support from organized labor.

March 9: Florida primary

The week after Massachusetts, Carter righted the ship by defeating Wallace and Jackson in Florida. The liberal candidates, with the exception of Milton Shapp, were not on the ballot and largely stayed out of the state; Jackson finished third. Jackson sought to capitalize on momentum from his victory in Massachusetts, but set expectations low given his poor polling in the state. The campaign was acrimonious; Carter sought to maintain his status as the frontrunner by accusing Washington insiders of coordinating against him and accused Jackson of exploiting desegregation busing as an issue. Jackson countered with attacks on Carter's civil rights record as Governor. Wallace, who had won Florida in 1972, staked his campaign on the state. Carter ultimately defeated Wallace narrowly with around a third of the vote; in his victory speech, Carter declared that the result represented "not only a New South, but a new America."

March 16: Illinois primary

Carter then proceeded to slowly but steadily accumulate delegates in primaries around the nation. In Illinois, the Democratic presidential candidates were overshadowed by a power struggle between Chicago mayor Richard J. Daley and Governor Dan Walker. Daley won control of the delegation through a slate of delegates pledged to Senator Adlai Stevenson III, but among the declared candidates for the presidency, Carter won a convincing victory over Wallace in both the presidential preference primary and the separate delegate selection races.

April: New York, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania

He also knocked his key rivals out of the race one by one. He won a more dominant victory over Wallace in the North Carolina primary on March 23, winning his first majority in any state and thus neutralizing his main rival in the South. On April 6, Carter won a narrow come-from-behind victory in Wisconsin over Mo Udall, although Udall won the most delegates. Jackson won a convincing victory over Udall in the New York primaries, but when Carter defeated Jackson in Pennsylvania on April 27, Jackson quit the race, citing a lack of funds.[1][2][3][4]

As Carter continued to gain momentum, a "Stop Carter" movement behind the late-starting campaigns of California Governor Jerry Brown and Senator Frank Church of Idaho. Though neither candidate could secure the nomination themselves, they stood in the hopes of deadlocking the convention and denying Carter the nomination. Now facing an organized opposition, Carter dropped several key Western primaries in May and June.

Total popular vote in primaries[104]

Democratic National Convention

The 1976 Democratic National Convention was held in New York City. By the time the convention opened Carter already had more than enough delegates to win the nomination, and so the major emphasis at the convention was to create an appearance of party unity, which had been lacking in the 1968 and 1972 Democratic Conventions. Carter easily won the nomination on the first ballot; he then chose Senator Walter Mondale of Minnesota, a liberal and a protege of Hubert Humphrey, as his running mate.

The tally at the convention was:[107]

Vice presidential nomination

By June, Carter had the nomination sufficiently locked up and could take time to interview potential vice-presidential candidates.

The pundits predicted that Frank Church would be tapped to provide balance as an experienced senator with strong liberal credentials. Church promoted himself, persuading friends to intervene with Carter in his behalf. If a quick choice had been required as in past conventions, Carter later recalled, he would probably have chosen Church. But the longer period for deliberation gave Carter time to worry about his compatibility with the publicity-seeking Church, who had a tendency to be long-winded. Instead, Carter invited Senators Edmund Muskie, John Glenn and Walter Mondale, and Congressman Peter W. Rodino to visit his home in Plains, Georgia, for personal interviews, while Church, Henry M. Jackson, and Adlai Stevenson III would be interviewed at the convention in New York. Rodino revealed he had no interest in the position, and of all the other potential candidates, Carter found Mondale the most compatible. As a result, Carter selected Mondale as his running mate.

African American leadership within the Democratic Party had sought to potentially place Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, Congressman Ron Dellums, or Congresswoman Barbara Jordan on the ticket with Carter. However, Jordan took herself out of consideration, and Carter did not have any interest in the other candidates put forward.

The vice presidential tally, in part, was:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Oldham, Kit (August 19, 2003). "Jackson, Henry M. "Scoop"". HistoryLink.org.
  2. ^ a b David Wilma and Kit Oldham (November 7, 2003). "State voters elect Dixy Lee Ray as first woman governor of Washington, re-elect Senator Henry Jackson and House incumbents, and prefer Ford to Carter on November 2, 1976". HistoryLink.org. Archived from the original on 2005-11-27.
  3. ^ a b Salam, Reihan (May 27, 2003). "Double Scoop". The New Republic Online.
  4. ^ a b "Jimmy Carter's Big Breakthrough". Time Magazine. May 10, 1976. Archived from the original on 2014-10-13.
  5. ^ "WALLACE BEATS CARTER, 3-1, IN MISSISSIPPI'S CAUCUSES". The New York Times. New York, New York. January 26, 1976. Retrieved September 18, 2023.
  6. ^ "EX-GEORGIA GOVERNOR HOLDS EDGE IN DEMOCRAT BALLOTING". The Lawton Constitution. Lawton, Oklahoma. February 15, 1976. Retrieved September 18, 2023.
  7. ^ "DEMOCRATS TO CAUCUS SATURDAY". The Clarion-Ledger. Jackson, Mississippi. February 15, 1976. Retrieved September 18, 2023.
  8. ^ "WALLACE WINS 9 MISSISSIPPI DELEGATES". The New York Times. New York, New York. February 22, 1976. Retrieved September 18, 2023.
  9. ^ "DFL FOR HHH ONE MORE TIME". The Minneapolis Star. Minneapolis, Minnesota. February 25, 1976. Retrieved September 22, 2023.
  10. ^ "FORD WON 18 OF 21 DELEGATES IN PRIMARY IN NEW HAMPSHIRE". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 2, 1976. Retrieved September 18, 2023.
  11. ^ "FINAL TALLIES IN 2 RACES". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 4, 1976. Retrieved September 18, 2023.
  12. ^ "VERMONT'S NEW PRIMARY DREW SOME 27% OF ELIGABLE VOTERS". The Bennington Banner. Bennington, Vermont. March 10, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.(subscription required)
  13. ^ "FORD APPARENT WINNER IN WASHINGTON CAUCUSES". The Columbian. Vancouver, Washington. March 3, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  14. ^ "FINAL TOTALS IN FLORIDA PRIMARY". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 11, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  15. ^ "LATE VOTE TOTALS IN ILLINOIS RACES". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 18, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  16. ^ "FORD AND CARTER AMASSING DELEGATES". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 18, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  17. ^ "LATE VOTE TOTALS IN ILLINOIS RACES". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 18, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  18. ^ "FORD AND CARTER AMASSING DELEGATES". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 18, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  19. ^ "OKLAHOMA PARTY SPLITS ON CARTER". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 20, 1976. Retrieved September 18, 2023.
  20. ^ "FINAL TOTALS IN N. CAROLINA". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 21, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  21. ^ "SOUTH CAROLINA DEMOCRATS GIVE CARTER 9 OF THEIR 31 DELEGATES". The New York Times. New York, New York. April 1, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  22. ^ "CARTER TAKES THE LEAD IN DELEGATE SELECTIONS IN KANSAS COUNTIES". The New York Times. New York, New York. April 1, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  23. ^ "TULSAN PULLS UPSET FOR KEY DEMO POST". The Tulsa World. Tulsa, Oklahoma. April 4, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  24. ^ "CARTER IS VICTOR IN 2 STATE RACES". The New York Times. New York, New York. April 1, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  25. ^ "JACKSON LIKELY TO SWEEP PUERTO RICAN DELEGATES". The News Tribune. Tacoma, Washington. April 5, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  26. ^ "2 BLACKS NAMED TO PA. DELEGATION". The State. Columbia, South Carolina. June 30, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  27. ^ "State's Delegates to the Conventions". The New York Times. 8 April 1976. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  28. ^ "Jackson Won in New York By Narrowly Based Voting; Did Best in Queens and Brooklyn and With Jews and Moderates – Crangle Hails 'Draft Humphrey' Success". The New York Times. 8 April 1976. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  29. ^ "FORD EASY VICTOR". The New York Times. New York, New York. April 7, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  30. ^ "CARTER... HOW, WHY". The Wisconsin State Journal. Madison, Wisconsin. April 8, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  31. ^ "CARTER AND UDALL LEAD AS DELEGATES PICKED IN IOWA". The New York Times. New York, New York. April 7, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  32. ^ "CARTER WINS 17 OF IOWA'S 47 DELEGATES". The Des Moines Register. Des Moines, Iowa. April 11, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  33. ^ "DEMOCRATS IN MISSOURI AVOIDING CHOICES". The New York Times. New York, New York. April 22, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  34. ^ "DEMOCRATS ELECT 547 OF 839 DELEGATES AS UNCOMMITTED". The St. Louis Post-Dispatch. St. Louis, Missouri. April 22, 1976. Retrieved September 19, 2023.
  35. ^ "GRAVEL 'THINK TANK' PROPOSAL OPENS DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION". The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. Fairbanks, Alaska. May 30, 1976. Retrieved September 21, 2023.
  36. ^ "FORD, HHH BIG WINNERS AT STATE DISTRICT MEETINGS". The St. Cloud Times. St. Cloud, Minnesota. April 26, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  37. ^ "ARIZONA PRIMARY IS WON BY UDALL". The New York Times. New York, New York. April 26, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
  38. ^ "TUESDAY'S VOTING EFFECTS". The New York Times. New York, New York. March 29, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
  39. ^ "SIZE OF CARTER WIN PRESSURES NEUTRAL DELEGATES". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. March 29, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
  40. ^ "RESULTS OF DELEGATE ELECTION SAID OFFICIAL". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. May 4, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  41. ^ "PANEL OKAYS STATE DEMOCRATIC DELEGATION". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. May 9, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  42. ^ "DEMOCRATIC VOTE PROPELS REAGAN TO TEXAS SWEEP". The New York Times. New York, New York. May 3, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
  43. ^ "FORD, HHH BIG WINNERS AT STATE DISTRICT MEETINGS". The Winona Daily News. Winona, Minnesota. May 3, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  44. ^ "RESULTS IN ALABAMA SHOW WALLACE STRENGTH FADING". The New York Times. New York, New York. May 6, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
  45. ^ "GEORGIANS BACK CARTER, REAGAN". The New York Times. New York, New York. May 5, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
  46. ^ "REAGAN LEADS FORD, CARTER WINS". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. May 5, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
  47. ^ "INVALID VOTES MAR CAPITAL PRIMARY". The New York Times. New York, New York. May 6, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
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  49. ^ "PANEL OKAYS STATE DEMOCRATIC DELEGATION". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. May 9, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  50. ^ "NATIONAL DELEGATES PICKED BY DEMS". The Casper Star-Tribune. Casper, Wyoming. May 9, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
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  57. ^ "HALF OF UTAH DELEGATES UNCOMMITTED, PRIMARY REVEALS". The Daily Herald. Provo, Utah. June 8, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
  58. ^ "BROWN SCORES UPSET OVER CARTER; PAUL SARBANES STOPS JOE TYDINGS". The Daily Times. Salibury, Maryland. May 19, 1976. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
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  62. ^ "FORD APPARENT WINNER IN WASHINGTON CAUCUSES". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. May 23, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
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  84. ^ "NORTH DAKOTA DEMO PICKS ARE LISTED". The Colorado Springs Gazette-Telegraph. Colorado Springs, Colorado. June 27, 1976. Retrieved September 23, 2023.
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  107. ^ "Our Campaigns - US President - D Convention Race - Jul 12, 1976". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
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1976 Democratic Party presidential primaries
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