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1971 Giro d'Italia

1971 Giro d'Italia
Race details
Dates20 May - 10 June 1971
Stages20 + Prologue
Distance3,567 km (2,216 mi)
Winning time97h 24' 03"
Results
Winner  Gösta Pettersson (SWE) (Ferretti)
  Second  Herman Van Springel (BEL) (Molteni)
  Third  Ugo Colombo (ITA) (Filotex)

Points  Marino Basso (ITA) (Molteni)
  Mountains  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) (KAS)
  Team Molteni
← 1970
1972 →

The 1971 Giro d'Italia was the 55th edition of the Giro, one of cycling's Grand Tours. The 3,567-kilometre (2,216 mi) race consisted of 20 stages and an opening prologue, starting in Lecce on 20 May and finishing at the Vigorelli velodrome in Milan on 10 June. There were three time trial stages and a single rest day. Gösta Pettersson of the Ferretti team won the overall general classification, becoming the first Swedish rider to win a Grand Tour. Herman Van Springel (Molteni) placed second, 2 min and 32 s in arrears, and Ugo Colombo (Filotex) was third, just three seconds slower than Van Springel.[1]

Teams

Tour de France organizer Félix Lévitan and the Mars-Flandria were in disagreements over the team's participation in the coming Tour de France and there was speculation that the team would instead race the Giro d'Italia.[2] The team chose to wait for Lévitan's decision regarding their entry, which came following the Giro's start, and therefore did not participate in the Giro.[3] Ultimately, Lévitian requested the team to pay extra money, on top of the 25,000 franc entry fee, to participate in the Tour.[3] A total of 10 teams were invited to participate in the 1971 Giro d'Italia.[4]

Each team sent a squad of ten riders, so the Giro began with a peloton of 100 cyclists.[4] The majority of riders were Italian (72), while 28 riders were foreign.[5] Of the non-Italians, Belgians had the most with twelve riders, 10 Spaniards which comprised the whole KAS team, 3 Swedes, 2 Swiss, and one French rider.[5] Only two of the ten teams entering the race were not based in Italy: KAS (Spain) and Magniflex (Belgium).[6] Giorgio Favaro was the last rider to arrive for the race because his Molteni teammate Martin Van Den Bossche was removed shortly before the race's start due to the discovery of an abscess that was operated on in a Vicenza hospital.[5][7] Out of the riders that started this edition of the Giro d'Italia, a total of 75 riders made it to the finish in Milan.[8]

The teams that took part in the race were:[4][9]

  • G.B.C.
  • KAS
  • Magniflex

Pre-race favorites

On 15 January, it was announced that Eddy Merckx the winner of the previous year's race and the 1968 edition would not participate in the race for the first time in four years.[10][6] Instead, he would focus solely on preparing for the upcoming Tour de France, which he hoped to win for the third consecutive year.[10] An El Mundo Deportivo writer felt Merckx's absence opened the race for other riders to win.[11] The starting peloton featured three previous winners: Franco Balmamion (1962 & 1963) riding for Scic, Salvarani's Felice Gimondi (1965 & 1967), and Gianni Motta (1966), also of Salvarani.[6] Gimondi had finished in the top five of the general classification in each Giro since 1965.[6] Motta entered the Giro after having won the Tour de Romandie.[6] Motta and Gimondi were named favorites.[6][11] Salvarani announced they would be racing the Tour de France in July; however, Het Vrije Volk writer Peter Ouwerkerk questioned whether the team - which had thirteen riders total - had enough stamina for these large three-week races.[12]

Ouwerkerk felt Salvarani's biggest challenger was to be the Molteni team, even without Merckx, and he specifically felt Herman Van Springel was capable of winning the race.[12] He referenced Gimondi's previous season where he exceeded expectations as a primary reason for his support.[11] Van Den Bossche was also thought to be a challenger for the Salvarani riders before his aforementioned withdrawal before the race.[6] Molteni's riders Marino Basso and Romano Tumellero were thought to give the team enough support in the absence of Merckx.[6] Italo Zilioli, Franco Bitossi, Gösta Pettersson, Patrick Sercu, and Michele Dancelli were other riders that were thought to be contenders for the overall victory.[12][6][13]

Route and stages

The race route was unveiled by race director Vincenzo Torriani on 24 February 1971.[14][15][16] The start of the race was announced to be in Lecce after the officials of the city paid 20 million lira to the organization to earn the honor.[5] The race contained 20 stages, one of which was a split stage, and one opening prologue.[14] There were ten stages that included categorized climbs that had points to count towards the mountains classification, including the twelfth stage which was a climbing individual time trial to the Serniga di Salò.[14] Six of the stages featured summit finishes.[14] Together, the amount of climbing for the categorized climbs included in the race totaled to be 26.5 km (16 mi).[14] There were three total time trials, two individual and one team leg.[14] The final stage of the race ended in Milan at the Vigorelli velodrome.[14] The race was televised in an hourly program each day and also covered over the radio.[17]

The race route traveled all the way down to the boot of the Italian countryside.[11] The opening prologue from Lecce to Apulia time trial stage covering 62.2 km (39 mi), was broken into ten equal 6.22 km (4 mi) segments, with one rider from each team of ten contesting one part.[18] The team with the lowest total time was declared winner and all of the team's riders go to wear the race leader's maglia rosa the following day.[18] The times did not count towards the general classification for the race.[18] When writing about this stage's format 44 years later, rider Renato Laghi commented "Torriani was forever having strange ideas.[18]"

The race entered two countries aside from Italy, Yugoslavia and Austria.[19] This was the first time the Giro entered Austria, as the race traveled through the country to finish on the Großglockner.[20] The race's entry into the Dolomites from June 7 to June 9 was expected to be the highlight.[6] Former Italian cyclist Cino Cinelli stated that he had tried to climb the mountain several times and that the race's cars would have a hard time climbing the mountain.[19][14]

There was some concern over the quality and condition of the some roads used early in the race, particularly during the second mass-start stage.[17] Five-time champion Alfredo Binda said "Only a climber can win it and it will remain uncertain until Ponte di Legno."[14] El Mundo writer Bosch praised race organizer Torriani for experimenting with new routes and felt that this route was "the best."[11]

Stage characteristics and results[8]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
P 20 May Lecce to Brindisi 62.2 km (39 mi) Team time trial Salvarani[N 1]
1 21 May Brindisi to Bari 175 km (109 mi) Plain stage  Marino Basso (ITA)
2 22 May Bari to Potenza 260 km (162 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Enrico Paolini (ITA)
3 23 May Potenza to Benevento 177 km (110 mi) Plain stage  Ercole Gualazzini (ITA)
4 24 May Benevento to Pescasseroli 203 km (126 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Guerrino Tosello (ITA)
5 25 May Pescasseroli to Gran Sasso d'Italia 198 km (123 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Vicente López Carril (ESP)
6 26 May L'Aquila to Orvieto 163 km (101 mi) Plain stage  Domingo Perurena (ESP)
7 27 May Orvieto to San Vincenzo 220 km (137 mi) Plain stage  Felice Gimondi (ITA)
8 28 May San Vincenzo to Casciana Terme 203 km (126 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Romeno Tumellero (ITA)
9 29 May Casciana Terme to Forte dei Marmi 141 km (88 mi) Plain stage  Marino Basso (ITA)
10 30 May Forte dei Marmi to Pian del Falco di Sestola 123 km (76 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
11 31 May Sestola to Mantua 199 km (124 mi) Plain stage  Marino Basso (ITA)
1 June Rest day
12 2 June Desenzano del Garda to Serniga di Salò 28 km (17 mi) Individual time trial  Davide Boifava (ITA)
13 3 June Salò to Sottomarina di Chioggia 218 km (135 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Patrick Sercu (BEL)
14 4 June Chioggia to Bibione 170 km (106 mi) Plain stage  Patrick Sercu (BEL)
15 5 June Bibione to Ljubljana (Yugoslavia) 201 km (125 mi) Plain stage  Franco Bitossi (ITA)
16 6 June Ljubljana (Yugoslavia) to Tarvisio 100 km (62 mi) Plain stage  Dino Zandegù (ITA)
17 7 June Tarvisio to Großglockner (Austria) 206 km (128 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Pierfranco Vianelli (ITA)
18 8 June Lienz (Austria) to Falcade 195 km (121 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Felice Gimondi (ITA)
19 9 June Falcade to Ponte di Legno 182 km (113 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Lino Farisato (ITA)
20a 10 June Ponte di Legno to Lainate 185 km (115 mi) Plain stage  Giacinto Santambrogio (ITA)
20b Lainate to Milan 20 km (12 mi) Individual time trial  Ole Ritter (DEN)
Total 3,567 km (2,216 mi)

Race overview

The race started at 1:45 PM local time in front of the Piazza Sant'Oronzo,[4] it was estimated that 200,000 people watched along the course.[23] Salvarani won the team time trial event by three seconds over Molteni and one of their leaders, Gimondi, registered the fastest time over the 6.2 km (4 mi) at 8' 26 s.[23] The favorites entering the day, Ferretti, finished in fourth, 52 s slower than Salvarani.[23] The group remained together initially before Molteni's Luigi Castelletti attacked off the front of the peloton and gained a few minutes advantage before KAS, G.B.C., and Ferretti riders raised the tempo and caught Castelletti.[24] As rain started to hit the course, Marinus Wagtmans (Molteni) won the second traguardi tricolori sprint of the leg, ahead of Attilio Rota (Dreher).[24] The two then opened up a gap between the peloton reaching 55", but Rota refused to help with the pace and the two were with several kilometers remaining.[24] After the day had under 30 km (19 mi) left there was a crash involving roughly 50 riders.[24] The riders remounted and another attacked ensued by a group of riders; however, it was caught as the peloton geared up for a bunch sprint.[24] The sprint to the line was closely contested by Franco Bitossi (Filotex) and Marino Basso (Molteni) and both celebrated as if to have won the stage, but a photo finish revealed Basso to be the victor and he assumed the lead of the general classification and points classification.[24] The second stage of the race was the longest of the race at 260 km (162 mi).[25]

During the seventeenth stage, that finished on the Großglockner, an Alpine pass.[26] Race leader Claudio Michelotto held on to the back of a team car to finish the climb and was given a one-minute penalty.[26] Following the stage, Pettersson took the race lead from Michelotto.[26] Pettersson became the first rider born north of the Rhine to win the Giro d'Italia.[26] In addition, he became the first Swedish rider to win a Grand Tour.[26]

Doping

Doping controls were conducted following each stage finish.[20] If a rider tested positive, the punishment was a ten-minute penalty and their stage results were voided.[20] It was announced on 26 May that Gianni Motta had tested positive for ephedrine.[27] In response to the news, Motta stated that he had used his grandmother's herbs to help with his fatigue.[27] Lucillo Lievore also tested positive.[20]

Classification leadership

Two different jerseys were worn during the 1971 Giro d'Italia. The leader of the general classification – calculated by adding the stage finish times of each rider – wore a pink jersey. This classification is the most important of the race, and its winner is considered as the winner of the Giro.[28]

For the points classification, which awarded a cyclamen jersey to its leader,[29] cyclists were given points for finishing a stage in the top 15.[30] The mountains classification leader. The climbs were ranked in first and second categories, the former awarded 50, 30, and 20 points while the latter awarded 30, 20, and 10 points.[31] In this ranking, points were won by reaching the summit of a climb ahead of other cyclists.[29] In addition there was the Cima Coppi, the Grossglockner, which was the highest mountain crossed in this edition of the race, which gave 200, 100, 80, 70, and 50 points to the first five riders summit the climb. The first rider over the Grossglockner was Pierfranco Vianelli.[31] Although no jersey was awarded, there was also one classification for the teams, in which the stage finish times of the best three cyclists per team were added; the leading team was the one with the lowest total time.[28]

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
A pink jersey
Points classification
A purple jersey
Mountains classification Team classification
P Salvarani Salvarani[N 1] not awarded not awarded not awarded
1 Marino Basso Marino Basso Marino Basso Molteni
2 Enrico Paolini Enrico Paolini Gianni Motta Michele Dancelli Scic
3 Ercole Gualazzini
4 Guerrino Tosello Roberto Sorlini
5 Vicente López Carril Ugo Colombo Marino Basso Vicente López Carril
6 Domingo Perurena Molteni
7 Felice Gimondi Aldo Moser Salvarani
8 Romano Tumellero Claudio Michelotto Molteni
9 Marino Basso José Manuel Fuente
10 José Manuel Fuente
11 Marino Basso
12 Davide Boifava
13 Patrick Sercu
14 Patrick Sercu
15 Franco Bitossi
16 Dino Zandegù
17 Pierfranco Vianelli Pierfranco Vianelli
18 Felice Gimondi Gösta Pettersson José Manuel Fuente
19 Lino Farisato
20a Giacinto Santambrogio
20b Ole Ritter
Final Gösta Pettersson Marino Basso José Manuel Fuente Molteni

Final standings

Legend
  A pink jersey   Denotes the winner of the General classification   A purple jersey   Denotes the winner of the Points classification

General classification

Final general classification (1–10)[29][32][33]
Rank Name Team Time
1  Gösta Pettersson (SWE) Pink jersey Ferretti 97h 24' 04"
2  Herman Van Springel (BEL) Molteni + 2' 32"
3  Ugo Colombo (ITA) Filotex + 2' 35"
4  Francisco Galdós (ESP) KAS + 4' 27"
5  Pierfranco Vianelli (ITA) Dreher + 6' 41"
6  Silvano Schiavon (ITA) Dreher + 7' 27"
7  Felice Gimondi (ITA) Salvarani + 7' 30"
8  Antoine Hubrechts (BEL) Salvarani + 9' 39"
9  Wladimiro Panizza (ITA) Cosatto + 13' 13"
10  Giovanni Cavalcanti (ITA) Filotex + 14' 22"

Mountains classification[edit]

Final mountains classification (1–10)[8][34]
Name Team Points
1  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) KAS 360
2  Pierfranco Vianelli (ITA) Dreher 270
3  Primo Mori (ITA) Salvarani 190
4  Lino Farisato (ITA) Ferretti 170
5  Vicente López-Carril (ESP) KAS 140
6  Andrés Gandarias (ESP) KAS 110
7  Giancarlo Polidori (ITA) Scic 100
8  Selvino Poloni (ITA) Cosatto 80
9  Felice Gimondi (ITA) Salvarani 70
 Guerrino Tosello (ITA) Molteni

Points classification[edit]

Final points classification (1–10)[8][29]
Name Team Points
1  Marino Basso (ITA) A purple jersey Molteni 181
2  Patrick Sercu (BEL) Dreher 148
3  Felice Gimondi (ITA) Salvarani 139
4  Ole Ritter (DEN) Dreher 136
5  Albert Van Vlierberghe (BEL) Ferretti 116
6  Franco Bitossi (ITA) Filotex 96
7  Gösta Pettersson (SWE) Pink jersey Ferretti 92
 Dino Zandegù (ITA) Salvarani
9  Gianni Motta (ITA) Salvarani 85
10  Herman Van Springel (BEL) Molteni 84

Traguardi tricolori classification[edit]

Final traguardi tricolori classification (1–9)[29][32]
Name Team Points
1  Marinus Wagtmans (NED) Molteni 130
2  Wilmo Francioni (ITA) Ferretti 60
3  Primo Mori (ITA) Salvarani 50
4  Pietro Guerra (ITA) Salvarani 40
 Attilio Rota (ITA) Dreher
 Ole Ritter (DEN) Dreher
 André Poppe (FRA) Magniflex
 Roberto Sorlini (ITA) Cosatto
9  Giacinto Santambrogio (ITA) Molteni 30
 Giancarlo Bellini (ITA) Molteni
 Piero Dallai (ITA) Cosatto
 Guerrino Tosello (ITA) Molteni
 Ugo Colombo (ITA) Filotex
 Andrés Gandarias (ESP) KAS
 Marino Basso (ITA) Molteni
 Selvino Poloni (ITA) Cosatto
 Lino Farisato (ITA) Ferretti

Teams classification[edit]

Final team classification (1–10)[29][32]
Team Points
1 Molteni 5956
2 Salvarani 4476
3 Scic 4162
4 Dreher 3795
5 Ferretti 3768
6 KAS 3150
7 Filotex 2192
8 G.B.C. 1689
9 Cosatto 1584
10 Magniflex 1128

References

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b The results of the opening prologue did not count towards the general classification, but were instead used to determine who would wear the race leader's maglia rosa the following day.[8][21] Salvarani won the prologue and each member of their team wore a maglia rosa during the race's first stage.[22]

Citations

  1. ^ "Un Giro da restaurare" [A Tour to Restore]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 12 June 1971. p. 3. Archived from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  2. ^ "Mogelijk geen Tour voor Mars-Flandria" [Possibly no Tour for Mars-Flandria]. de Stem (in Dutch). 15 May 1971. p. 9 – via Delpher.
  3. ^ a b "Mars Flandria start in Tour de France" [Mars Flandria starts in Tour de France]. De Telegraaf (in Dutch). 21 May 1971. p. 27 – via Delpher.
  4. ^ a b c d "I 100 partenti" [100 Participants]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 20 May 1971. p. 3. Archived from the original on 31 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d Gino Sala (20 May 1971). "Etusiasmo a Lecce" [Enthusiasm in Lecce] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Gianni Motta et Felice Gimondi sont grands favoris" [Gianni Motta and Felice Gimondi are great favorites] (PDF). L'Impartial (in French). 19 May 1971. p. 18. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 October 2019 – via RERO.
  7. ^ "Van den Bossche <<no>> al Giro" [Van den Bossche <<no>> to Giro] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1971. p. 18. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  8. ^ a b c d e Bill and Carol McGann. "1971 Giro d'Italia". Bike Race Info. Dog Ear Publishing. Archived from the original on 27 February 2014. Retrieved 10 July 2012.
  9. ^ "Lista de inscritos" [Registered List] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 20 May 1971. p. 14. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  10. ^ a b "Merckx: no al Giro d'Italia" [Merckx: No to the Tour of Italy] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 16 January 1971. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  11. ^ a b c d e Juan Plans Bosch (20 May 1971). "Un <<Giro>> mas abierto, sin la sombra de Merckx" [A << Giro >> more open, without the shadow of Merckx] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. p. 14. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  12. ^ a b c Peter Ouwerkerk (19 May 1971). "Italië klaar voor Giro" [Italy Ready for Giro]. Het Vrije Volk (in Dutch). p. 7 – via Delpher.
  13. ^ Juan Plans Bosch (20 May 1971). "Un <<Giro>> mas abierto, sin la sombra de Merckx" [A << Giro >> more open, without the shadow of Merckx] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. p. 15. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i Gino Sala (25 February 1971). "Da Lecce a Milano Il Giro d'Italia 1971" [Da Lecce a Milano Il Giro d'Italia 1971] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  15. ^ Sergio Nera (25 February 1971). "Partenza il 20 maggio conclusione il 10 giugno formula originale" [Departure on May 20 conclusion June 10 original formula]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). p. 1 & 10. Archived from the original on 29 April 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  16. ^ "El "Giro" 71 Esta Ya Modelado" [The "Giro" 71 Is Already Modeled] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 25 February 1971. p. 30. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 April 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  17. ^ a b Gino Sala (19 May 1971). "Domani da Lecce scatta il <<Giro>>" [Tomorrow from Lecce the <<Giro>> is taken] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 12. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  18. ^ a b c d Cycling News (29 April 2015). "Giro d'Italia 2015: Stage 1 preview". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 13 July 2016.
  19. ^ a b Gino Sala (20 May 1971). "Luciano Pezzi pronostica Zilioli ma dice: <<Gran cosa se vincesse Vianelli o Boifava>>" [Luciano Pezzi predicts Zilioli but says: << Great thing if Vianelli or Boifava wins >>] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  20. ^ a b c d "1971". Giro d'Italia. La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2017. Archived from the original on 1 July 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  21. ^ "Estas son las etapas" [These are the stages] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 20 May 1971. p. 15. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  22. ^ "Gimondi e Motta in coro <<Dovranno tremare tutti>>" [Gimondi and Motta in chorus << They will tremble all >>]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 21 May 1971. p. 2. Archived from the original on 31 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  23. ^ a b c Gino Sala (21 May 1971). "Gimondi il piu veloce, quindi Crepaldi, Houbrechts, Zandegu e Motta - Basso ha lamentato disturbi gastrici L'avvocato Petrosino interroghera oggi Basso e Bitossi in relazione al litigio avuto alla Coppa Bernocchi: e prevista per entrambi una squalifica di 15 giorni" [Gimondi the fastest, then Crepaldi, Houbrechts, Zandegu and Motta - Basso complained of gastric disorders. Petrosino, a lawyer, today asked Basso and Bitossi about the quarrel he had had at the Bernocchi Cup: a disqualification of 15 days is planned for both] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  24. ^ a b c d e f Gino Sala (22 May 1971). "Una paurosa caduta coinvolge 50 corridor" [A scary fall involves 50 corridors] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 12. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  25. ^ Gino Sala (23 May 1971). "Paolini: tappa e primato Crolla Gimondi (a 8'40")" [Paolini: stage and primacy Crolla Gimondi (at 8'40 ")] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 12. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  26. ^ a b c d e Tomas Nilsson (9 June 2009). "The original Swedish sensation". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 28 July 2016. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  27. ^ a b "Motta slikte Oma's kruiden" [Motta Took Grandma's Herbs]. Het Vrije Volk (in Dutch). 27 May 1971. p. 7 – via Delpher.
  28. ^ a b Laura Weislo (13 May 2008). "Giro d'Italia classifications demystified". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 8 May 2013. Retrieved 13 July 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d e f "Giro d'Italia In Cifre" [Tour of Italy In Figures]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 11 June 1971. p. 2. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  30. ^ "Regolamento" [Regulation]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 19 May 1966. p. 9. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  31. ^ a b "G. P. Montagna" [G. P. Mountains]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). June 1971. p. 2. Archived from the original on 1 January 2015. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  32. ^ a b c "Gosta Pettersson Gano El "Giro"" [Gosta Pettersson wins the "Tour"] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 11 June 1971. p. 17. Archived (PDF) from the original on 26 January 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  33. ^ Gino Sala (11 June 1971). "Fischiato Gimondi Applausi a Colombo" [Gimondi Applauded in Colombo] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 October 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2012.
  34. ^ "G. P. Montagna" [G. P. Mountains]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 10 June 1971. p. 2. Archived from the original on 31 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
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1971 Giro d'Italia
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