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1950 Giro d'Italia

1950 Giro d'Italia
Race details
Dates24 May - 13 June 1950
Stages18
Distance3,981 km (2,474 mi)
Winning time117h 28' 03"
Results
Winner  Hugo Koblet (SUI) (Guerra–Ursus)
  Second  Gino Bartali (ITA) (Bartali)
  Third  Alfredo Martini (ITA) (Taurea)

  Mountains  Hugo Koblet (SUI) (Guerra–Ursus)
  Sprints  Annibale Brasola (ITA) (Benotto)
  Team Fréjus–Superga
← 1949
1951 →

The 1950 Giro d'Italia was the 33rd edition of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours. The Giro started in Milan on 24 May with a 225 km (139.8 mi) individual time trial and concluded in Salsomaggiore Terme with a 230 km (142.9 mi) relatively flat mass-start stage on 13 June. Fifteen teams entered the race, which was won by Swiss Hugo Koblet of the Guerra team. Second and third respectively were Italians Gino Bartali and Alfredo Martini.[1]

Teams

It was announced in January 1950 that there would not be more than 100 riders starting the race.[2] However, fifteen teams of seven were granted entry for the race.[3][4] This meant the starting peloton consisted of 105 cyclists,[3][5] the same amount that started the 1949 edition.[6] Italians comprised the majority of the entrants (88), while the remaining 17 foreign riders were from France (9), Switzerland (5), Belgium (2), and Luxembourg (1).[3] Of the starting riders, 75 completed the course.[7]

The teams entering the race were:[3][8]

Pre-race favorites

Gino Bartali (left, pictured at the 1950 Tour de France), Fausto Coppi (center, pictured at the 1952 Tour de France), and Fiorenzo Magni (right, pictured at the 1951 Tour de France) were later known as the "Big Three" in Italian cycling. Bartali and Coppi both entered having won three editions of the Giro each, while Magni had won only one (1948).

The race featured three previous winners of the Giro d'Italia that later became known as the "Big Three" or "Italian Tripod": Gino Bartali (Bartali), Fausto Coppi (Bianchi–Ursus), and Fiorenzo Magni (Wilier Triestina).[7][5][9] That season the three of them had success in the classics as Bartali won Milan–San Remo, Coppi won Paris–Roubaix and La Flèche Wallonne, and Magni won his second Tour of Flanders.[7] Despite this, many writers and fellow riders like Magni, Jean Robic, and Giulio Bresci still viewed it as a competition between Coppi and Bartali,[10][11] with Coppi was regarded as the favorite entering the race.[12][13] When asked who was his toughest opponent in the race, Coppi answered Bartali and Robic.[10]

A Nouvelliste valaisan writer commented that this was the first Giro to feature foreigners as team captains.[13] 1947 Tour de France winner Robic (Viscontea), Fritz Schär (Arbos), and Ferdinand Kübler (Fréjus–Superga) entered as sole leaders of their respective squads.[13] Guerra–Ursus's leader upon entry was Belgian Marcel Dupont, while teammate Hugo Koblet's recent form made some believe he may end up leading the team during the race.[13][14] El Mundo Deportivo's Luis Bettonica felt that for either Bartali or Coppi to not win they will have to face a large amount of difficulties.[15] Vito Ortelli (Atala) was not viewed as a serious challenger following a poor performance at the Tour de Romandie and due to his general inconsistent finishes.[5][11] Ortelli when asked about his intentions at the Giro, replied "I will be running it."[10] Kübler was seen as a threat to challenge Bartali and Coppi because his team was strong and had openly stated he would be in good form when the race hits Locarno.[5] The French team (Helyett–Hutchinson) featured Apo Lazaridès and Lucien Teisseire, who placed second and third at the 1948 world championships, respectively.[7] Legnano–Pirelli brought sprinter Adolfo Leoni who won several stages and wore the race leader's pink jersey late into the last year's race before Coppi took the race lead with two stages left and young rider Pasquale Fornara.[11] Taurea's Luciano Maggini was seen as a contender for the sprint finishes, while Alfredo Martini and Giancarlo Astrua were expected to achieve high final rankings in the general classification.[11] l'Unità writer Attilio Camoriano expected Martini to be the "big surprise of the race."[11]

Route and stages

Before being released, it was rumored the race would go from 24 May to 11 June.[16] The route was revealed on 26 January 1950.[17][18][19] The route was thought to be easier than in previous years,[13][14] with the first several stages being fairly easy before the seventh stage introduced climbs over 1,100 m (3,609 ft).[13] The ninth stage in particular featured the three major climbs of Passo Rolle (1,970 m (6,463 ft)), Passo Pordoi (2,239 m (7,346 ft)), Gardena Pass (2,120 m (6,955 ft)).[13] In total the route was thought to be very flat as it contained 15,000 m (49,213 ft) of climbing.[14]

In a break from tradition the race started in Milan rather than finishing in .[12] This change was precipitated because 1950 was declared a Jubilee by Pope Pius XII.[14] Due to the route changes, this meant the Dolomites would be visited during the middle of the race, while the Apennines would be traversed near the race's conclusion.[12] Following the Milan opening in the Piazza del Duomo square,[5] the race route veered west passing through Florence and Genoa on its way into the Dolomites and passing through finishing in Locarno, a Swiss town.[14][5][20] Then the route turned south and traveled down along the Adriatic coast and traversed the Apennines before returning north to finish in Rome.[14]

Stage characteristics and results[7][21][22][23][24][25]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 24 May Milan to Salsomaggiore Terme 225 km (140 mi) Plain stage  Oreste Conte (ITA)
2 25 May Salsomaggiore Terme to Florence 245 km (152 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Alfredo Martini (ITA)
3 26 May Florence to Livorno 148 km (92 mi) Plain stage  Olimpio Bizzi (ITA)
4 27 May Livorno to Genoa 216 km (134 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Antonio Bevilacqua (ITA)
5 28 May Genoa to Turin 245 km (152 mi) Plain stage  Franco Franchi (ITA)
6 29 May Turin to Locarno (Switzerland) 220 km (137 mi) Plain stage  Hugo Koblet (SUI)
7 31 May Locarno (Switzerland) to Brescia 293 km (182 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Luciano Maggini (ITA)
8 1 June Brescia to Vicenza 214 km (133 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Hugo Koblet (SUI)
9 2 June Vicenza to Bolzano 272 km (169 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Gino Bartali (ITA)
3 June Rest day
10 4 June Bolzano to Milan 294 km (183 mi) Plain stage  Mario Fazio (ITA)
11 5 June Milan to Ferrara 251 km (156 mi) Plain stage  Adolfo Leoni (ITA)
12 6 June Ferrara to Rimini 144 km (89 mi) Plain stage  Antonio Bevilacqua (ITA)
13 7 June Rimini to Arezzo 244 km (152 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Luciano Maggini (ITA)
14 8 June Arezzo to Perugia 185 km (115 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Fritz Schär (SUI)
9 June Rest day
15 10 June Perugia to L'Aquila 185 km (115 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Giancarlo Astrua (ITA)
16 11 June L'Aquila to Campobasso 203 km (126 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Fiorenzo Magni (ITA)
17 12 June Campobasso to Naples 167 km (104 mi) Plain stage  Annibale Brasola (ITA)
18 13 June Naples to Rome 230 km (143 mi) Plain stage  Oreste Conte (ITA)
Total 3,981 km (2,474 mi)

Classification leadership

The leader of the general classification – calculated by adding the stage finish times of each rider, and subtracting time bonuses – wore a pink jersey. This classification is the most important of the race, and its winner is considered as the winner of the Giro.[26]

Two additional jerseys were awarded. The green jersey was given to the highest ranked non-Italian cyclist in the general classification, and the white jersey was given to the highest ranked independent[27] cyclist in the general classification.[28] Another green jersey was awarded to the best placed foreign rider in the general classification.[28]

There were also some classifications without associated jerseys. There was the mountains classification, for which the race organizers selected different mountains that the route crossed and awarded points to the riders who crossed them first.[26]

There was a black jersey (maglia nera) awarded to the rider placed last in the general classification. The classification was calculated in the same manner as the general classification.

Secondly, there was an intermediate sprints classification. In twelve stages, there were intermediate sprints midway of the stage, where points for this classification could be won.

The winner of the team classification was determined by adding the finish times of the best three cyclists per team together and the team with the lowest total time was the winner.[7][29] If a team had fewer than three riders finish, they were not eligible for the classification.[7][29]

There several time bonuses awarded to riders for various accomplishments during the race.[28]

The rows in the following table correspond to the jerseys awarded after that stage was run.[28] A one-minute bonus was given to the winner of each stage, the intermediate sprint in the twelve stages containing a sprint, and the winner of a mountain classification climb.[28] Second place in those same categories awarded a 30 s time bonus.[28]

Stage Winner General classification
Best foreign rider
Best independent rider
Mountains classification Last in General classification
Team classification
1 Oreste Conte Oreste Conte Désiré Keteleer Umberto Drei not awarded Aldo Tosi & Egidio Feruglio Bianchi–Ursus
2 Alfredo Martini Fritz Schär Fritz Schär Silvio Pedroni Fritz Schär Marcello Paolieri Taurea
3 Olimpio Bizzi
4 Antonio Bevilacqua Hugo Koblet
5 Franco Franchi
6 Hugo Koblet
7 Luciano Maggini Alfredo Martini Fausto Coppi Mario Gestri
8 Hugo Koblet Hugo Koblet Hugo Koblet Giuseppe Molinari
9 Gino Bartali Hugo Koblet Serse Coppi
10 Mario Fazio Mario Gestri
11 Adolfo Leoni
12 Antonio Bevilacqua
13 Luciano Maggini Fréjus–Superga
14 Fritz Schär
15 Giancarlo Astrua
16 Fiorenzo Magni
17 Annibale Brasola
18 Oreste Conte
Final Hugo Koblet Hugo Koblet Silvio Pedroni Hugo Koblet Mario Gestri Fréjus–Superga

Final standings

Legend
  A pink jersey   Denotes the winner of the General classification   A white jersey   Denotes the winner of the Independent rider
  A green jersey   Denotes the winner of the Foreign rider classification

General classification

Final general classification (1–10)[7]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Hugo Koblet (SUI) Pink jersey A green jersey Guerra–Ursus 117h 28' 03"
2  Gino Bartali (ITA) Bartali + 5' 12"
3  Alfredo Martini (ITA) Taurea + 8' 41"
4  Ferdinand Kübler (SUI) Fréjus–Superga + 8' 45"
5  Luciano Maggini (ITA) Taurea + 10' 49"
6  Fiorenzo Magni (ITA) Wilier Triestina + 12' 14"
7  Silvio Pedroni (ITA) A white jersey Fréjus–Superga + 13' 07"
8  Luciano Pezzi (ITA) Atala + 14' 34"
9  Giulio Bresci (ITA) Bottecchia + 18' 08"
10  Pietro Giudici (ITA) Cimatti + 20' 05"

Foreign rider classification[edit]

Final foreign rider classification (1–10)[30]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Hugo Koblet (SUI) A green jersey Pink jersey Guerra–Ursus 117h 28' 03"
2  Ferdinand Kübler (SUI) Fréjus–Superga + 8' 43"
3  Fritz Schär (SUI) Arbos + 23' 53"
4  Nello Lauredi (FRA) Helyett–Hutchinson + 26' 39"
5  André Brule (FRA) Viscontea + 1h 25' 54"
6  Apo Lazaridès (FRA) Helyett–Hutchinson + 1h 27' 50"
7  Jean Goldschmit (LUX) Fréjus–Superga + 1h 43' 17"
8  Désiré Keteleer (BEL) Bianchi–Ursus + 1h 46' 29"
9  Gottfried Weilenmann (SUI) Guerra–Ursus + 1h 58' 22"
10  José Beyaert (FRA) Helyett–Hutchinson + 2h 00' 12"

Independent rider classification[edit]

Final independent rider classification (1–10)[31]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Silvio Pedroni (ITA) A white jersey Fréjus–Superga 117h 41' 10"
2  Pietro Giudici (ITA) Cimatti + 6' 58"
3  Donato Zampini (ITA) Ganna–Superga + 13' 29"
4  Armando Barducci (ITA) Fréjus–Superga + 15' 27"
5  Giacomo Zampieri (ITA) Bottecchia + 21' 31"
6  Franco Franchi (ITA) Taurea + 39' 10"
7  Valerio Bonini (ITA) Benotto + 54' 14"
8  Sergio Pagliazzi (ITA) Arbos + 1h 02' 42"
9  Leo Castellucci (ITA) Arbos + 1h 07' 12"
10  Renzo Soldani (ITA) Legnano–Pirelli + 1h 10' 31"

Mountains classification[edit]

Final mountains classification (1–9)[32]
Rank Rider Team Points
1  Hugo Koblet (SUI) Pink jersey A green jersey Guerra–Ursus 43
2  Gino Bartali (ITA) Bartali 29
3  Jean Robic (FRA) Viscontea 21
4  Vittorio Rossello (ITA) Taurea 11
 Fritz Schär (SUI) Arbos
6  Pasquale Fornara (ITA) Legnano–Pirelli 10
7  Fausto Coppi (ITA) Bianchi–Ursus 9
8  Serse Coppi (ITA) Bianchi–Ursus 8
9  Valerio Bonini (ITA) Benotto 6
 Alfredo Martini (ITA) Taurea
 Ferdinand Kübler (SUI) Legnano–Pirelli
 Aldo Ronconi (ITA) Benotto

Intermediate sprints classification[edit]

Final intermediate sprints classification (1–9)[32]
Rank Rider Team Points
1  Annibale Brasola (ITA) Benotto 27
2  Oreste Conte (ITA) Bianchi–Ursus 20
3  Hugo Koblet (SUI) Pink jersey A green jersey Guerra–Ursus 15
4  Giovanni Corrieri (ITA) Bartali 10
 Renzo Zanazzi (ITA) Arbos
6  Ferdinand Kübler (SUI) Fréjus–Superga 9
7  Serse Coppi (ITA) Bianchi–Ursus 8
 Antonio Bevilacqua  (ITA) Wilier Triestina 8
9  Primo Volpi (ITA) Viscontea 7

Team classification

Final team classification (1-10)[33]
Rank Team Time
1 Fréjus–Superga 353h 14' 35"
2 Taurea + 21' 21"
3 Cimatti + 41' 19"
4 Bottecchia + 46' 10"
5 Legnano–Pirelli + 1h 53' 15"
6 Arbos + 2h 00' 35"
7 Benotto + 2h 37' 08"
8 Atala + 2h 42' 23"
9 Viscontea + 2h 46' 44"
10 Guerra–Ursus + 2h 52' 58"

Minor awards

Two blue bracelets were awarded for winning a stage with the greatest time gap between the second placed rider.[32] Koblet won the first bracelet for winning the sixth stage into Locarno by 1' 48s, while the second bracelet was given to Astrua for his victory on the fifteenth leg that finished in L'Aquila.[32] He won that stage by five minutes and six seconds.[32] A classification was kept regarding the amount of stage victories per rider.[32] The classification was split by four riders who each won two stages: Conte (stages 1 and 18), Bevilacqua (stages 4 and 12), Koblet (stages, and 8), and Luciano Maggini (stages 7 and 13).[32]

Aftermath

Following the race, the entire peloton that finished the race traveled to St. Peter's Basilica to hear a Wednesday service by Pope Pius XII on 14 June.[34] In particular, Koblet and Bartali spoke with the Pope personally and the Pope asked of Coppi's health.[34] Previous winner Fausto Coppi, who was recovering in a Trento hospital, commented "Koblet deserved to win the Tour of Italy and he is worthy of all praise."[34] Following the race, Guerra announced Koblet renewed his contract with the team.[34] A Swiss newspaper writer Nouvelliste Valaisan wrote that the Swiss riders dominated the race, holding the race lead for all but two days, and all five Swiss riders that started, finished the race.[35] The writer commented that Koblet was not seen as the initial leader for Guerra, as Marcel Dupont entered as their leader.[35] The writer also felt that Koblet's victory earned Swiss cycling respect within the cycling community and may lead to an invitation for a ten-man team to a future Tour de France – which at the time was contested by national teams rather than trade teams.[35] Ferdinand Kübler was viewed to have a great race relative when compared to his last Grand Tour, the 1949 Tour de France.[35] Based on his high finish Kübler was expected to seriously contend at the upcoming Tour de France.[35][36] Had the race been run without time bonuses factored into the general classification, Bartali would have won the race by 18 seconds over Koblet.[32]

References

Citations

  1. ^ "El suizo Koblet" [The Swiss Koblet] (in Spanish). Rome, Italy: El Mundo Deportivo. 14 June 1950. p. 1. Archived from the original on 6 July 2013. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  2. ^ "Non piu di 100 corridori quest'anno al Giro d'Italia" [No more than 100 runners this year at the Giro d'Italia] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 27 January 1950. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  3. ^ a b c d "I corridori in gara" [The riders in the race]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 24 May 1950. p. 13. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  4. ^ "C'è un interrogativo per le squadre straniere al Giro d'Italia" [There is a question for foreign teams at the Giro d'Italia]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 26 January 1950. p. 1 & 5. Archived from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Vico Rigazzi (24 May 1950). "Les Chances de Kubler au Tour d'Italie" [Kubler's Chances at the Tour of Italy]. Gazzette de Lausanne (in French). p. 6 – via Le Temps.
  6. ^ "I 105 concorrenti" [The 105 competitors] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 21 May 1949. p. 2. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Bill and Carol McGann. "1950 Giro d'Italia". Bike Race Info. Dog Ear Publishing. Retrieved 2012-07-10.
  8. ^ "15 Case - 105 corridori" [15 Teams - 105 Riders] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 24 May 1950. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  9. ^ "Le Tour d'Italie" [The Tour of Italy] (PDF). La Liberté (in French). 24 May 1950. p. 16. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 October 2019 – via RERO.
  10. ^ a b c "Il Giro d'Italia che parte oggi da Milano" [The Giro d'Italia which starts today from Milan] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 24 May 1950. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d e Attilio Camoriano (23 May 1950). "Sul pronostico del 33 Giro d'Italia di nuovo i nomi di Coppi e Bartali" [On the prediction of the 33rd Giro d'Italia again the names of Coppi and Bartali] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  12. ^ a b c "1950". Giro d'Italia. La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2018. Archived from the original on 12 October 2019. Retrieved 13 June 2019.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g E.U. (24 May 1950). "Le Tour d'Italie" [The Tour of Italy] (PDF). Nouvelliste valaisan (in French). p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 October 2019 – via RERO.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Luis Bettonica (24 May 1950). "Con 105 Participantes" [With 105 Participantes] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. p. 1. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 October 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2019.
  15. ^ Luis Bettonica (24 May 1950). "Con 103 Participantes" [With 103 Participantes] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. p. 2. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 October 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2019.
  16. ^ L. F. (3 January 1950). "Il Giro d'Italia con partenza e arrivo a Milano dal 24 Maggio all'11 giugno?" [The Giro d'Italia with departure and arrival in Milan from 24 May to 11 June?]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). p. 1 & 6. Archived from the original on 5 May 2020. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  17. ^ "Il XXXVI Giro d'Italia in 18 tappe per complessivi 3800 km" [The XXXVI Giro d'Italia in 18 stages for a total of 3800 km]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 27 January 1950. p. 1. Archived from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  18. ^ "Giro d'Italia argomento del giorno" [Tour of Italy the topic of the day]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 28 January 1950. p. 1. Archived from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  19. ^ "La provocazione del "Giro d'Italia" iu organizzata dai dirgenti titini" [The provocation of the "Giro d'Italia" organized by the ruling Titini] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 27 January 1950. p. 3. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  20. ^ Attilio Camoriano (21 May 1950). "Il "Giro" morde il freno come un cavallo al nastro" [The "Giro" bites the brake like a ribbon horse] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  21. ^ "Dal cuore di Milano 33 Giro d'Italia" [From the heart of Milan 33 Giro d'Italia]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 24 May 1950. p. 1 & 6. Archived from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  22. ^ "Così si presenta il XXXIII Giro d'Italia" [This is how the XXXIII Giro d'Italia appears]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 23 May 1950. p. 1 & 3. Archived from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  23. ^ Ennio Mantella (22 May 1950). "Il XXXIII Giro d'Italia è sul piede di partenza" [The XXXIII Giro d'Italia is on the starting foot]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). p. 1. Archived from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  24. ^ Ennio Mantella (20 May 1950). "Squadre forti e organiche nel XXXIII Giro d'Italia" [Strong and organic teams in the XXXIII Giro d'Italia]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). p. 1 & 6. Archived from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  25. ^ "Gli abbuoni per velocisti e scalatori del XXXIII Giro d'Italia" [The bonuses for sprinters and climbers of the XXXIII Giro d'Italia]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 19 May 1950. p. 1 & 6. Archived from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  26. ^ a b Laura Weislo (13 May 2008). "Giro d'Italia classifications demystified". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 8 May 2013. Retrieved 13 July 2013.
  27. ^ In the 1950s, there was a license system for cyclists; the highest level was "professional", and the second was "independent".
  28. ^ a b c d e f "Il film della gara" [The film of the race classification]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 14 June 1950. p. 6. Archived from the original on 30 April 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  29. ^ a b "L'ultima tappa in una immensa cornice di folla e la vittoria di Leoni" [The final step in a huge frame of the crowd and the victory of Leoni]. Il Littoriale (in Italian). Milan, Italy. 10 June 1940. p. 2. Archived from the original on 14 May 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  30. ^ "Classifica maglia verde" [Green jersey classification]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 14 June 1950. p. 5. Archived from the original on 22 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  31. ^ "Classifica maglia bianca" [White jersey classification]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 14 June 1950. p. 5. Archived from the original on 22 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h "Classifica scalatori" [Mountains classification]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 14 June 1950. p. 6. Archived from the original on 22 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  33. ^ "Classifica a squadre" [Team classification]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 14 June 1950. p. 7. Archived from the original on 22 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  34. ^ a b c d "Apres le Tour d'Italie" [After the Tour of Italy] (PDF). La Sentinelle (in French). 15 June 1950. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 1 October 2019 – via RERO.
  35. ^ a b c d e E.U. (15 June 1950). "Apres le "Giro"" [After the "Giro"] (PDF). Nouvelliste Valaisan (in French). p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 1 October 2019 – via RERO.
  36. ^ Attilio Camoriano (14 June 1950). "Il 33 Giro d'Italia si e concluso ieri a Roma con la vittoria di Koblet davanti a Bartali" [The 33rd Giro d'Italia ended yesterday in Rome with the victory of Koblet in front of Bartali] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on 1 October 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
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1950 Giro d'Italia
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