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1927 Georgia Bulldogs football team

1927 Georgia Bulldogs football
National champion (Berryman, Boand, Poling)
ConferenceSouthern Conference
Record9–1 (6–1 SoCon)
Head coach
Offensive schemeNotre Dame Box
CaptainIvey Shiver
Home stadiumSanford Field
Uniform
Seasons
← 1926
1928 →
1927 Southern Conference football standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   T W   L   T
Georgia Tech + 7 0 1 8 1 1
Tennessee + 5 0 1 8 0 1
NC State + 4 0 0 9 1 0
Vanderbilt 5 0 2 8 1 2
No. 8 Georgia 6 1 0 9 1 0
Florida 5 2 0 7 3 0
Ole Miss 3 2 0 5 3 1
Virginia 4 4 0 5 4 0
Clemson 2 2 0 5 3 1
Alabama 3 4 1 5 4 1
LSU 2 3 1 4 4 1
Mississippi A&M 2 3 0 5 3 0
Washington and Lee 2 3 0 4 4 1
VPI 2 3 0 5 4 0
Maryland 3 5 0 4 7 0
South Carolina 2 4 0 4 5 0
VMI 2 4 0 6 4 0
Tulane 2 5 1 2 5 1
North Carolina 2 5 0 4 6 0
Sewanee 1 4 0 2 6 0
Kentucky 1 5 0 3 6 1
Auburn 0 6 1 0 7 2
  • + – Conference co-champions
Rankings from Dickinson System

The 1927 Georgia Bulldogs football team represented the University of Georgia in the sport of American football during the 1927 Southern Conference football season. This was the last season George Cecil Woodruff served as the head coach of the football team and the team's 34th season of college football. The Bulldogs posted a 9–1 record,[1] and were retroactively selected as the 1927 national champion under the Berryman QPRS, Boand, and Poling systems.[2] The team was ranked No. 8 in the nation in the Dickinson System ratings released in December 1927.[3]

Called the "dream and wonder team", the Bulldogs were ranked No. 1 in the US with one regular season game remaining, but were upset in the mud by in-state rival Georgia Tech (the next season's national champion).[4] Georgia did not win the Southern Conference (SoCon) championship in 1927 as a result of its loss to Georgia Tech at season's end. Georgia Tech (7–0–1 SoCon), Tennessee (5–0–1 SoCon), and NC State (4–0–0 SoCon) all finished undefeated in conference play.[5]

The season featured Georgia's first-ever win against Yale as well as six shutouts. The win over Yale propelled Georgia to the national spotlight.[6] The team was anchored by two All-American ends, captain Chick Shiver and consensus All-American Tom Nash.

Preseason

At the end of last season, one source described Georgia as "probably the hardest hit team in the Southern Conference, losing 14 letter men with the Thanksgiving game."[7]

Woodruff resignation

Coach Woodruff said he would quit after this season.[8] Former Notre Dame back Jim Crowley and Notre Dame lineman Harry Mehre assisted Woodruff with his Notre Dame Box scheme.

Schedule

DateOpponentSiteResultAttendanceSource
October 1VirginiadaggerW 32–0[9]
October 8at Yale*W 14–1018,000[10]
October 15Furman*
  • Sanford Field
  • Athens, GA
W 32–0[11]
October 22vs. AuburnW 33–0[12]
October 29at TulaneW 31–010,000[13]
November 5at FloridaW 28–016,000[14]
November 12Clemson
W 32–0[15]
November 19Mercer*
  • Sanford Field
  • Athens, GA
W 26–7[16]
November 24at AlabamaW 20–725,000[17]
December 3at Georgia TechL 0–1238,000[18]
  • *Non-conference game
  • daggerHomecoming

Game summaries

Week 1: Virginia

To open the season, Herdis McCrary averaged a touchdown a quarter and the Bulldogs romped over the Virginia Cavaliers 32–0.[19]

The starting lineup was: Nash (left end), Morris (left tackle), Jacobson (left guard), Boland (center), Smith (right guard), Stelling (right tackle), Shiver (right end), Broadnax (quarterback), Estes (left halfback), McTigue (right halfback), McCrary (fullback)[20]

Week 2: at Yale

Week 2: Georgia at Yale
1 234Total
Georgia 7 700 14
Yale 7 300 10

In the second week of play, Georgia defeated Yale by the score of 14–10, the school's first win over an Eastern power.[21] Georgia was propelled into the national spotlight.[6] Bobby Hooks threw a 59-yard touchdown pass to Frank Dudley.[22]

The starting lineup was: Nash (left end), Stelling (left tackle), Smith (left guard), Boland (center), Jacobson (right guard), Morris (right tackle), Shiver (right end), Broadnax (quarterback), Estes (left halfback), McTigue (right halfback), McCrary (fullback)

Week 3: Furman

Week 3: Furman at Georgia
1 234Total
Furman 0 000 0
Georgia 13 667 32

Georgia defeated the Furman Purple Hurricane 32–0, giving the Purple Hurricane its only loss this season. Furman twice was within Georgia's 5-yard line.[23]

However, Georgia's backs also ran well.[23] Frank Dudley had a 55-yard run for a score shortly after the start of the second quarter, and Roy Estes placed the ball in scoring position in the third with a 52-yard run.[23]

The starting lineup was: Nash (left end), Morris (left tackle), Haley (left guard), Boland (center), Jacobson (right guard), Paitz (right tackle), Shiver (right end), Broadnax (quarterback), Estes (left halfback), McTigue (right halfback), McCrary (fullback).[23]

Week 4: Auburn

Week 4: Auburn at Georgia
1 234Total
Auburn 0 000 0
Georgia 0 2607 33
  • Source:

In the fourth week of play, Georgia beat Auburn 33–0. Four touchdowns were scored in the second period, when coach Woodruff sent in his first-string backfield.[24] A long pass from Hooks to McCrary got one touchdown.[24]

The starting lineup was: Nash (left end), Morris (left tackle), Haley (left guard), Boland (center), Jacobson (right guard), Lautzenheizer (right tackle), Shiver (right end), Broadnax (quarterback), Estes (left halfback), Hooks (right halfback), McCrary (fullback).[24]

Week 5: at Tulane

The Bulldogs traveled to New Orleans and beat Tulane 31–0. McCrary was kept on the bench as the halfbacks provided most of the scoring.[25]

Week 6: at Florida

Week 6: Florida vs. Georgia
1 234Total
Florida 0 000 0
Georgia 0 7147 28

Georgia beat the Florida Gators 28–0 after leading just 7–0 at the half. Florida quarterback Goof Bowyer broke his leg.[26] The starting lineup was: Nash (left end), Morris (left tackle), Jacobson (left guard), Boland (center), Smith (right guard), Lautzenheizer (right tackle), Shiver (right end), Broadnax (quarterback), Estes (left halfback), McTigue (right halfback), Rothstein (fullback).[27]

Week 7: Clemson

Week 7: Clemson at Georgia
1 234Total
Clemson 0 000 0
Georgia 13 1306 32
  • Date: November 12
  • Location: Athens, Georgia

McCrary scored three of the five touchdowns in the 32–0 victory over Clemson.[28]

McTigue ran in the first score. Roy Estes threw a 51-yard touchdown pass to H. F. Johnston. McCrary replaced Rothstein and added two touchdowns.[28] The second team went in the second half, in which McCrary added another touchdown.[28]

The starting lineup was: Nash (left end), Morris (left tackle), Jacobson (left guard), Boland (center), Haley (right guard), Lautenheizer (right tackle), Shiver (right end), Broadnax (quarterback), Estes (left halfback), McTigue (right halfback), Rothstein (fullback).[29]

Week 8: Mercer

Week 8: Mercer at Georgia
1 234Total
Mercer 0 700 7
Georgia 7 6013 26
  • Date: November 19, 1927
  • Location: Athens, Georgia

Georgia started the Mercer game with its second string and won 26–7.[30] One report before the game reads: "Mercer's football team has about as much chance of beating Georgia as The Cluster has of having compulsory chapel abolished."[31]

Mercer's Phoney Smith was the first southern player to cross the goal line against Georgia, on an 80-yard punt return.[32][30]

Week 9: at Alabama

Week 9: Georgia at Alabama
1 234Total
Georgia 7 760 20
Alabama 0 007 7
  • Date: November 24
  • Location: Athens, Georgia
  • Game attendance: 25,000

The game on November 24 against the Alabama Crimson Tide was the first game played in the newly completed Legion Field. The 20–7 Bulldog victory snapped a five-game losing streak against Alabama.[n 1]

Estes passed to Nash for the first score, and Estes ran the second score in himself. Another pass to Nash got a touchdown in the third quarter. In the final period, Alabama's Brasfield went back to pass, but saw no one open, and took off running. In the game's most sensational play, he dodged three tacklers behind the line, and evaded three more on his way to the endzone.[33]

The starting lineup was: Nash (left end), Morris (left tackle), C. Smith (left guard), Boland (center), Jacobson (right guard), Lautenheizer (right tackle), Shiver (right end), Johnson (quarterback), McTigue (left halfback), Estes (right halfback), Hill (fullback).[34]

Week 10: at Georgia Tech

Week 10: Georgia at Georgia Tech
1 234Total
Georgia 0 000 0
Ga. Tech 0 660 12
  • Date: December 3
  • Location: Grant Field
    Atlanta
  • Game attendance: 38,000
  • Referee: Gardner (Cornell)
Scene from the Georgia Tech game

Georgia was ranked number 1 by the Dickinson system. Grant Field was expected to be filled to capacity, the largest crowd ever in the south.[37] One account read "And never in the history of athletics in the Southland has there been an occasion so momentous as this. The football championship of the South and as some may justifiably figure, the nation, will be decided on Saturday in the capital city and native sons will decide it."[38]

In the rain, the Bulldogs were defeated by rival Georgia Tech for the SoCon championship 12–0. For the first time this year, neither Nash nor Shiver played particularly well.[39]

Tech's first touchdown came on a pass from Warner Mizell to quarterback Bob Durant. The second one came shortly after Stumpy Thomason returned an interception 57 yards to Georgia's 22-yard line.[35][36] Thomason scored on a 13-yard end run.[36]

The starting lineup was: Nash (left end), Morris (left tackle), Jacobson (left guard), Boland (center), Smith (right guard), Lautenheizer (right tackle), Shiver (right end), Johnson (quarterback), Estes (left halfback), Dudley (right halfback), McCrary (fullback).[36]

Postseason

Legacy

By season's end, both Georgia and Yale were national champions according to various selectors. Despite the loss to Tech, the Bulldogs were retroactively selected as the 1927 national champion under the Boand, Poling, and Berryman QPRS systems.[2] Walter Eckersall noted the progress of southern football as he reflected on Georgia's victory over Yale; "Old Eli, with its running attack, could do nothing against Georgia, which is represented by two of the finest ends in the country. Nash and Shiver would be valuable assets on any football team."[40]

Players

Depth chart

The following chart provides a visual depiction of Georgia's lineup during the 1927 season with games started at the position reflected in parentheses. The chart mimics a Notre Dame Box on offense.

LE
Tom Nash (8)
Henry G. Palmer (0)
 
 
 
LT LG C RG RT
J. Robert Morris (7) Roy Jacobson (4) Ike Boland (8) Roy Jacobson (4) Glenn Lautzenhiser (5)
H. Cree Stelling (1) Gene Haley (2) Gene Smith (3) J. Robert Morris (1)
Theodore Frisbie (0) Gene Smith (2) Gene Haley (1) Paitz (1)
J. Hill (0) J. Hill (0) H. Cree Stelling (1)
 
RE
Chick Shiver (8)
Henry G. Palmer (0)
 
 
 
QB
Johnny Broadnax (6)
H. F. Johnson (2)
Tommy Paris (0)
RHB
Robert McTigue (5)
Frank Dudley (1)
Roy Estes (1)
Bobby Hooks (1)
LHB
Roy Estes (7)
Robert McTigue (1)
Cook (0)
FB
Herdis McCrary (5)
Bennie Rothstein (2)
Harvey Hill (1)

Line

Number Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
18 Ike Boland Center 8 175
33 Theodore Frisbie Tackle
32 Eugene S. Haley Guard
17 J. Hill Guard
16 Roy H. Jacobson Guard 8
1 Glenn Lautzenhiser Tackle 5 Tech High
25 J. Robert Morris Tackle 8
19 Tom Nash End 8 Washington, Georgia 6'3" 205
27 Henry G. Palmer End
26 Chick Shiver End 8 Sylvester, Georgia 6'1" 190
10 Gene Smith Guard 5 Montgomery, Alabama 5'9" 190
23 H. Cree Stelling Tackle

Backfield

Number Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
8 Johnny Broadnax Quarterback University School for Boys
7 Cook Halfback
9 Frank Dudley Halfback
3 Roy Estes Halfback
28 Harvey Hill Fullback
29 Bobby Hooks Halfback
30 H. F. Johnson Quarterback
12 Herdis McCrary Fullback Bicknell, Indiana 6'0" 200
4 Robert McTigue Halfback
24 Tommy Paris Quarterback
6 Bennie Rothstein Fullback

Unlisted

Number Player
2 Davidson
5 Cox
11 Buchanan
13 Bradley
14 Martin
15 Nixon
20 Collins
21 Sanford
22 Stewart
31 Greenfield
34 Reigle
38 Eubanks

[41]

Staff

  • Head coach: Kid Woodruff
  • Manager: Keith Lewis, James M. Roberts

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Alabama's loss to Georgia Tech prior in the season snapped their own 24-game unbeaten streak.

References

  1. ^ "1927 Georgia Bulldogs Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 29, 2015.
  2. ^ a b National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2015). "National Poll Rankings" (PDF). NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA. p. 109. Retrieved January 13, 2016.
  3. ^ "Illinois Rated As America's Champs: Dr. Dickinson of Illinois Devises Rating System for Grid Teams". The Morning Call. December 4, 1927. p. 12 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Football National Championships". UGA Sports Communications. August 2, 2006. Archived from the original on December 17, 2013. Retrieved January 12, 2007.
  5. ^ "Conference Championships – Southern Conference". College Football Data Warehouse. 2007. Archived from the original on October 16, 2006. Retrieved January 13, 2007.
  6. ^ a b Jon Nelson (August 1, 2010). 100 Things Bulldogs Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die. Triumph Books. p. 25. ISBN 9781617492594. Retrieved March 25, 2015 – via Google books. Open access icon
  7. ^ "Many Faces Pass From Grid After Thanksgiving Fights". Hattiesburg American. November 23, 1926. p. 3.
  8. ^ "Georgia Coach to Quit Post". Kingsport Times. October 2, 1927. p. 8. Retrieved April 14, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  9. ^ "Georgia defeats Virginia 32 to 0". The Miami Herald. October 2, 1927. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Georgia scores 14 to 0 triumph over Yale". The Roanoke Times. October 9, 1927. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Georgia swamps Furman 32 to 0". Bristol Herald Courier. October 16, 1927. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Georgia tramples Auburn". Columbus Ledger-Enquirer. October 23, 1927. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Bulldogs administer crushing defeat to Tulane eleven, 31 to 0". The Montgomery Advertiser. October 30, 1927. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Georgia swamps Florida". The Pensacola Journal. November 6, 1927. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "Georgia rides to 32–0 victory over Clemson". Anniston Star. November 13, 1927. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Bulldogs trim Bears, 26–7". The Atlanta Constitution. November 20, 1926. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Georgia overcomes jinx and beats Alabama, 20 to 6". The Birmingham News. November 25, 1927. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Title hopes fall in mud, record crowd sees Golden Tornado capture Southern title". The Kansas City Star. December 4, 1927. Retrieved December 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "Georgia Bulldogs Score Brilliant 32 to 0 Victory Over Virginia U". Kingsport Times. p. 2. Retrieved April 14, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  20. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 206
  21. ^ "Georgia Whips Yale Bulldogs". The Lincoln Star. October 9, 1927. p. 14. Retrieved March 25, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  22. ^ Garbin, Patrick (August 1, 2007). "Then Vince Said to Herschel... ": The Best Georgia Football Stories Ever Told. Triumph Books. ISBN 9781600780110 – via Internet Archive.
  23. ^ a b c d e "Georgia Backs Go Around Hurricane Ends To Win 32 to 0". The Index-Journal. October 16, 1927. p. 7. Retrieved August 6, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  24. ^ a b c "Bulldogs Add Another Scalp To Collection". The Anniston Star. October 23, 1927. p. 8. Retrieved January 3, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  25. ^ "Bulldogs Run Over Tulane Winning 31-0". The Anniston Star. October 30, 1927. p. 8. Retrieved April 14, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  26. ^ Frank S. Wright (December 8, 1927). "Ernest Bowyer Given Highest Florida Honor". St. Petersburg Times. p. 3.
  27. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 250
  28. ^ a b c "Georgia Rides To 32-0 Victory Over Clemson". Anniston Star. November 13, 1927. p. 10. Retrieved February 29, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  29. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 258
  30. ^ a b "Mercer Falls Before Georgia Bulldogs 26-8". The Anniston Star. November 20, 1927. p. 10. Retrieved January 5, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  31. ^ "The Georgia Game". Mercer Cluster. November 18, 1927.
  32. ^ Garbin, Patrick (2008). About them Dawgs!: Georgia football's memorable teams and players. United States: Scarecrow Press. pp. 43, 48. ISBN 978-0-8108-6040-7.
  33. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on October 20, 2016. Retrieved April 30, 2016.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  34. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 273
  35. ^ a b Patrick Garbin (2008). About Them Dawgs!: Georgia Football's Memorable Teams and Players. Scarecrow Press. p. 44. ISBN 9780810860407.
  36. ^ a b c d "Biggest Upset of Southern Conference Spoils 'U' Mark". Oakland Tribune. December 4, 1927. p. 33. Retrieved July 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  37. ^ "Georgia 11 Meets Ancient Tech Foes". Ironwood Daily Globe. December 3, 1927. p. 5. Retrieved August 2, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  38. ^ Lawrence Perry (December 2, 1927). "Georgia and Georgia Tech Clash in Annual Grid Classic". Oakland Tribune. p. 43. Retrieved July 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  39. ^ "All-American Debate Boils Over Nation". The Bismarck Tribune. December 7, 1927. p. 8. Retrieved July 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  40. ^ Patrick Garbin (2008). About Them Dawgs!: Georgia Football's Memorable Teams and Players. Scarecrow Press. p. 46. ISBN 9780810860407 – via Google books. Open access icon
  41. ^ "CONTENTdm".

Additional sources

  • Woodruff, Fuzzy (1928). A History of Southern Football 1890–1928. Vol. 3.
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1927 Georgia Bulldogs football team
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