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Sawai Mansingh Stadium

Sawai Mansingh Stadium
SMS
Sawai Mansingh Stadium during IPL 2013
Map
AddressJanpath, Lalkothi, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
LocationJaipur, Rajasthan
OwnerGovernment of Rajasthan
OperatorRajasthan Cricket Association
Seating typeStadium seating
Capacity24,000
SurfaceGrass
Ground information
Establishment1969 (55 years ago) (1969)
TenantsIndian Cricket Team
Rajasthan cricket team
Rajasthan Royals (2008-15 & 2018–present)
End names
Van Vihar Colony End
Garh Ganesh Temple End
International information
Only Test21 February 1987:
 India v  Pakistan
First ODI2 October 1983:
 India v  Pakistan
Last ODI16 October 2013:
 India v  Australia
Only T20I17 November 2021:
 India v  New Zealand
First WODI25 January 1984:
 India v  Australia
Last WODI21 December 2006:
 India v  Sri Lanka
As of 17 November 2021
Source: ESPNcricinfo

The Sawai Mansingh Stadium, popularly known as SMS Stadium is a cricket stadium in Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Established in 1969, It is named after Sawai Man Singh II, the former Maharaja of the state of Jaipur.[1] Owned by the Government of Rajasthan and operated by RCA, the stadium has a seating capacity of about 24,000 spectators.[2] It is the home ground of Rajasthan Royals, in the Indian Premier League (IPL) since 2008.[3]

History

The Sawai Mansingh Stadium has hosted a solitary Test match, between India and Pakistan, starting in February 1987, when Pakistan President General Zia-ul-Haq crossed the border to watch the second day's play as part of his "Cricket for Peace" initiative.

The Test was notable for Younis Ahmed's return to the Test fray after an absence of over 17 years and also for Sunil Gavaskar's dismissal to the first ball of the Test match, for the third time in an otherwise illustrious career.

The game sputtered to a draw after the third day's play was abandoned following heavy rain and a controversy over the alleged deposition of sawdust on the wicket which Pakistan objected to.

The stadium's ODI debut had kicked off with a contest between the same two sides on 2 October 1983. Fresh from their World Cup triumph, the Indians comfortably won by four wickets, sporting the same XI that won the World Cup final.

The ground has also hosted two World Cup matches in 1987 and 1996 respectively, the West Indians losing to England in the former and beating Australia in the latter. The last ODI played on the ground is between India and Australia in October 2013 which they won comfortably by just losing one wicket chasing 362 in just 43.3 overs.

The highest individual score by any batsman on this ground in ODIs is 183 (not out) by Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

This is also the venue in which Virat Kohli made the fastest 100 for India in ODIs as India chase total of 359 against Australia which was second highest successful chase in ODIs, after the Johannesburg epic between Australia and South Africa.[4]

Matches

The first ODI, played at Sawai Mansingh stadium, kicked off with a contest between India and Pakistan in 1983, in which, India won by four wickets.[5] The 1987 Test between India and Pakistan proved to be an instrument of peace, when Pakistan President General Zia-ul-Haq came over to witness the second day's play as part of his "Cricket for Peace" initiative.[6][7]

The game, which saw Sunil Gavaskar being dismissed to the first ball of a Test match for the third time in his career, ended in a draw amid a controversy over the alleged deposition of sawdust on the wicket that Pakistan objected.[6]

Sawai Mansingh Stadium has hosted IPL matches for Rajasthan Royals its local team and who won first season.

Last IPL match of 2024 held on 22 Apr 2024.

In a match at Sawai Mansingh Stadium in 2008, Sohail Tanvir became the first player in IPL history to take a 6 wicket haul while playing for Rajasthan Royals v Chennai Super Kings.[8]

Ground records

  • The highest ODI total at this ground is 362-1 by India against Australia in 2013–14.[9]
  • The lowest ODI total at this ground is 125 by England against India.[9]
  • The highest individual score by any batsman on this ground in ODI is 183 not out by Mahendra Singh Dhoni on 31 October 2005.[10]
  • The Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur is situated in the picturesque state of Rajasthan, India. The stadium has hosted only one Test between India and Pakistan and it has hosted a number of ODIs.[6]
  • This is also the ground where Sourav Ganguly and Sachin Tendulkar most successful opening pair for India in ODIs opened the innings for the first time.

Re-development

During lalit Modi's tenure as a RCA president, in 2006, the stadium underwent a renovation at a cost of ₹20 crore.[11] A cricket academy was built for ₹7 crore, which has 28 appointed rooms, a gym, a restaurant, 2 conference halls and a swimming pool.[12]

New facilities:

  • Media rooms
  • Galleries
  • 2 new blocks

Major tournaments

List of Centuries

Key

  • * denotes that the batsman was not out.
  • Inns. denotes the number of the innings in the match.
  • Balls denotes the number of balls faced in an innings.
  • NR denotes that the number of balls was not recorded.
  • Parentheses next to the player's score denotes his century number at Edgbaston.
  • The column title Date refers to the date the match started.
  • The column title Result refers to the player's team result

Test Centuries

No. Score Player Team Balls Inns. Opposing team Date Result
1 110 Mohammad Azharuddin  India 211 1  Pakistan 21 February 1987 Draw[13]
2 125 Ravi Shastri  India - 1  Pakistan 21 February 1987 Draw[13]
3 114 Rameez Raja  Pakistan 279 2  India 21 February 1987 Draw[13]

One Day Internationals

No. Score Player Team Balls Inns. Opposing team Date Result
1 104 Geoff Marsh  Australia 139 1  India 7 September 1986 Lost[14]
2 111 David Boon  Australia 118 1  India 7 September 1986 Lost[14]
3 102 Krishnamachari Srikkanth  India 104 2  Australia 7 September 1986 Won[14]
4 100* Vinod Kambli  India 149 1  England 18 January 1993 Lost[15]
5 105 Sachin Tendulkar  India 134 1  West Indies 11 November 1994 Won[16]
6 102 Ricky Ponting  Australia 112 1  West Indies 4 March 1996 Lost[17]
7 106 Daryll Cullinan  South Africa 130 1  India 23 October 1996 Won[18]
8 138* Kumar Sangakkara  Sri Lanka 147 1  India 31 October 2005 Lost[19]
9 183* MS Dhoni  India 145 2  Sri Lanka 31 October 2005 Won[19]
10 104* Chris Gayle  West Indies 118 2  Bangladesh 11 October 2006 Won[20]
11 123* Shahriar Nafees  Bangladesh 161 1 Won[21]
12 133* Chris Gayle  West Indies 135 2  South Africa 2 November 2006 Won[22]
13 138* Gautam Gambhir  India 116 2  New Zealand 1 December 2010 Won[23]
14 141* Rohit Sharma  India 123 2  Australia 16 October 2013 Won[24]
15 100* Virat Kohli  India 52 2  Australia 16 October 2013 Won[24]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur T20 records: Highest team total, most wickets and more key stats". SportsAdda. 23 March 2024. Retrieved 7 April 2024.
  2. ^ "Sawai Mansingh Stadium: All you need to know". Rajasthan Royals. Retrieved 7 April 2024.
  3. ^ "Sawai Mansingh Stadium: All you need to know". Rajasthan Royals. Retrieved 7 April 2024.
  4. ^ "India's fastest ODI ton, and a glut of most expensive spells | Cricket | ESPN Cricinfo". espncricinfo.com. Retrieved 25 February 2017.
  5. ^ "India vs Pakistan, 2 October 1983". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 October 2023.
  6. ^ a b c "Sawai Mansingh Stadium - Cricket Ground in Jaipur, India". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 October 2023.
  7. ^ "Sawai Mansingh Stadium Records". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 October 2023.
  8. ^ "IPL Records Sawai Mansingh Stadium". T20 Head to Head. 9 March 2023. Retrieved 20 March 2023.
  9. ^ a b "IND: Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur Cricket Ground ODI match team highest innings total". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 October 2023.
  10. ^ "Batting records | One-Day Internationals | Cricinfo Statsguru". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 October 2023.
  11. ^ "The Telegraph - Calcutta (Kolkata) | 7days | Who's this man?". 12 December 2009. Archived from the original on 12 December 2009. Retrieved 7 April 2024.
  12. ^ "The Telegraph - Calcutta (Kolkata) | 7days | Who's this man?". telegraphindia.com. Archived from the original on 12 December 2009. Retrieved 25 February 2017.
  13. ^ a b c "3rd Test, Pakistan tour of India at Jaipur, Feb 21-26 1987". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  14. ^ a b c "1st ODI, Australia tour of India at Jaipur, Sep 7 1986". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  15. ^ "2nd ODI, England tour of India at Jaipur, Jan 18 1993". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  16. ^ "5th ODI, West Indies tour of India at Jaipur, Nov 11 1994". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  17. ^ "26th Match, Wills World Cup at Jaipur, Mar 4 1996". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  18. ^ "4th Match, Titan Cup at Jaipur, Oct 23 1996". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  19. ^ a b "3rd ODI, Sri Lanka tour of India at Jaipur, Oct 31 2005". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  20. ^ "4th Qualifying Match (D/N), ICC Champions Trophy at Jaipur, Oct 11 2006". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  21. ^ "5th Qualifying Match (D/N), ICC Champions Trophy at Jaipur, Oct 13 2006". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  22. ^ "2nd Semi Final (D/N), ICC Champions Trophy at Jaipur, Nov 2 2006". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  23. ^ "2nd ODI (D/N), New Zealand tour of India [Nov 2010] at Jaipur, Dec 1 2010". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  24. ^ a b "2nd ODI (D/N), Australia tour of India at Jaipur, Oct 16 2013". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 August 2019.

26°53′38.51″N 75°48′11.61″E / 26.8940306°N 75.8032250°E / 26.8940306; 75.8032250

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Sawai Mansingh Stadium
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