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Minister for Youth Justice (New South Wales)

Minister of Youth Justice of New South Wales
The Hon. Jihad Dib MP
AppointerGovernor of New South Wales
PrecursorMinister of Justice
Minister for Juvenile Justice
Formation8 April 1999
First holderCarmel Tebbutt

The Minister for Youth Justice, formerly Minister for Juvenile Justice, is a ministry in the administration of New South Wales. The position supports the Attorney General and has occasionally been held concurrently with that office.[1]

Role and responsibilities

Prior to 1873 there were two legal officers in the ministry, Attorney General and the Solicitor General, however there was only one portfolio, the law officers of the crown. The Attorney was the senior law officer and responsible for the work of the Solicitor-General, Crown Solicitors, parliamentary draftsmen, the administration of the courts and supporting officers such as the Sheriff and Coroner. The Solicitor General represented the crown in court,[a] provided legal advice to the government, drafted bills and helped to prepare civil and criminal litigation.[4]

When the Attorney General Edward Butler resigned, the Solicitor General Joseph Innes was promoted to first law officer. Innes was not however replaced as Solicitor General. Instead Parkes created the new ministry of justice and public instruction. The minister assumed responsibility for the administration of the courts, sheriff and coroner, as well as the Council of Education, orphan schools, the public library, Australian Museum and observatory.[5] The first minister George Allen, was a solicitor who had a particular interest in education, having previously served as a commissioner of National education, supported the incorporation of the Sydney Grammar School and having a seat on the Council of Education immediately prior to his appointment as responsible minister.[6]

Prisons remained the responsibility of the Colonial Secretary.[7] In 1880 the ministry was split into the Minister of Justice and the Minister of Public Instruction.[5]

Prior to 1880 the Minister of Justice and Public Instruction was responsible for the administration of the courts, sheriff and coroner, as well as the Council of Education, orphan schools, the public library, Australian Museum and observatory.[8] In 1880 the ministry was split into the Minister of Justice and the Minister of Public Instruction following the passage of the Public Instruction Act of 1880 which required a minister to assume the responsibilities of the former Council of Education.[9][10]

The minister also assumed responsibility for prisons which had previously been the responsibility of the Colonial Secretary, however the Colonial Secretary retained responsibility for police.[7] The Minister for Justice was briefly responsible for Police from 1974 until 1975.[11] In 1978 the minister ceased to be responsible for prisons which became the responsibility of the Minister for Corrective Services.[9]

The ministry was held by the Attorney General in the third to sixth Wran ministries and was formally subsumed into the responsibilities of the Attorney General in the seventh Wran ministry in 1984. The portfolio was re-created in 1991, known for three weeks as the Minister for Courts Administration and Corrective Services, before returning to the name Minister for Justice.[12] The ministry was abolished in the First Carr ministry in 1995, with justice returning to be the responsibility of the Attorney General,[7] and juvenile justice being the responsibility of a separate minister. It was re-created in the Fourth Carr ministry in 2003 and was abolished in the Rees ministry in 2011.[13] The portfolio was re-created in the O'Farrell ministry in 2011, combined with the portfolio of police in 2015 and was abolished in the first Berejiklian ministry in 2017, replaced by the Minister for Counter Terrorism.[14]

Ministers

Title Minister  Party Term start Term end Time in office Notes
Minister for Juvenile Justice Carmel Tebbutt   Labor 8 April 1999 2 April 2003 3 years, 359 days
Diane Beamer 2 April 2003 3 August 2005 2 years, 123 days
Tony Kelly 3 August 2005 2 April 2007 1 year, 242 days
John Hatzistergos 2 April 2007 11 April 2007 9 days
Barbara Perry 11 April 2007 5 September 2008 1 year, 147 days
Graham West 8 September 2008 5 June 2010 1 year, 270 days
Barbara Perry 5 June 2010 28 March 2011 296 days
Minister for Youth Justice Jihad Dib   Labor 5 April 2023 present 1 year, 98 days

Former ministerial titles

Justice

Minister of Justice and Public Instruction of New South Wales
AppointerGovernor of New South Wales
Formation9 December 1873
First holderGeorge Allen
Final holderFrancis Suttor
Abolished30 April 1880
SuccessionMinister of Justice
Minister of Public Instruction
Minister for Justice of New South Wales
Final minister Troy Grant
AppointerGovernor of New South Wales
PrecursorMinister of Justice and Public Instruction
Formation1 May 1880
First holderFrancis Suttor
Final holderTroy Grant
Abolished30 January 2017
SuccessionMinister for Counter Terrorism
Title Minister [1] Party Term start Term end Time in office Notes
Minister of Justice and Public Instruction George Allen MLA None 9 December 1873 8 February 1875 1 year, 61 days [15]
Joseph Docker MLC 9 February 1875 21 March 1877 2 years, 40 days [16]
Francis Suttor MLA 22 March 1877 16 August 1877 147 days [17]
John Lackey MLA 17 August 1877 17 December 1877 122 days [18]
Joseph Leary MLA 18 December 1877 20 December 1878 1 year, 2 days [19]
Francis Suttor 21 December 1878 30 April 1880 1 year, 131 days [17]
Minister of Justice 1 May 1880 10 August 1880 101 days
Sir Joseph Innes 11 August 1880 13 October 1881 63 days
William Foster 14 October 1881 4 January 1883 1 year, 82 days
Henry Cohen 5 January 1883 6 October 1885 2 years, 274 days
James Farnell 7 October 1885 9 October 1885 2 days
Thomas Slattery 2 November 1885 21 December 1885 49 days
Louis Heydon 22 December 1885 4 February 1886 44 days
James Garvan   Protectionist 26 February 1886 19 January 1887 327 days
William Clarke   Free Trade 20 January 1887 16 January 1889 1 year, 362 days
Thomas Slattery   Protectionist 17 January 1889 7 March 1889 49 days
Albert Gould   Free Trade 8 March 1889 22 October 1891 2 years, 228 days
Richard O'Connor   Protectionist 23 October 1891 14 December 1893 2 years, 52 days
Thomas Slattery 15 December 1893 2 August 1894 230 days
Albert Gould   Free Trade 3 August 1894 15 August 1898 4 years, 12 days
Charles Lee 17 August 1898 3 July 1899 320 days
John Hughes 3 July 1899 13 September 1899 72 days
William Wood   Protectionist 14 September 1899 9 April 1901 1 year, 207 days
Robert Fitzgerald   Progressive 11 April 1901 16 July 1901 96 days
Bernhard Wise[b] 22 July 1901 14 June 1904 2 years, 328 days
Thomas Waddell   Progressive 15 June 1904 29 August 1904 75 days
Charles Wade   Liberal Reform 29 August 1904 20 December 1909 5 years, 113 days
John Garland 21 December 1909 20 October 1910 303 days
William Holman   Labor 21 October 1910 1 April 1912 1 year, 163 days
David Hall 2 April 1912 15 November 1916 4 years, 227 days
John Garland   Nationalist 15 November 1916 23 July 1919 2 years, 250 days
Jack FitzGerald 23 July 1919 12 April 1920 264 days
Edward McTiernan   Labor 12 April 1920 21 December 1920 253 days
William McKell[c] 22 December 1920 10 October 1921 292 days [21]
Thomas Bavin   Nationalist 20 December 1921 20 December 1921 7 hours
William McKell   Labor 20 December 1921 13 April 1922 114 days
Thomas Ley   Nationalist 13 April 1922 17 June 1925 3 years, 65 days
William McKell   Labor 17 June 1925 7 June 1927 1 year, 355 days
Andrew Lysaght 8 June 1927 18 October 1927 132 days
Minister for Justice John Lee   Nationalist 18 October 1927 3 November 1930 3 years, 16 days
Joseph Lamaro   Labor 4 November 1930 17 June 1931 225 days
William McKell 17 June 1931 13 May 1932 331 days
Sir Daniel Levy   United Australia 16 May 1932 17 June 1932 32 days
Lewis Martin 18 June 1932 16 August 1939 7 years, 59 days
Vernon Treatt 16 August 1939 16 May 1941 1 year, 273 days
Reg Downing   Labor 19 May 1941 31 May 1960 19 years, 12 days
Jack Mannix 31 May 1960 13 May 1965 4 years, 347 days
John Maddison   Liberal 13 May 1965 11 May 1976 10 years, 364 days
Ron Mulock   Labor 14 May 1976 19 October 1978 2 years, 158 days
Frank Walker 19 October 1978 1 February 1983 4 years, 105 days
Paul Landa 1 February 1983 5 April 1984 1 year, 64 days
Minister for Justice Terry Griffiths[d]   Liberal 28 June 1991 23 September 1992 1 year, 87 days [1]
Ted Pickering 23 September 1992 22 October 1992 29 days
Wayne Merton 22 October 1992 26 May 1993 216 days
John Hannaford 26 May 1993 4 April 1995 1 year, 313 days
Minister for Justice John Hatzistergos   Labor 2 April 2003 3 August 2005 2 years, 123 days [1]
Tony Kelly 3 August 2005 2 April 2007 1 year, 242 days
John Hatzistergos 2 April 2007 30 January 2009 1 year, 303 days
Minister for Justice Greg Smith   Liberal 3 April 2011 17 April 2014 3 years, 14 days [1]
Brad Hazzard 23 April 2014 2 April 2015 344 days
Minister for Justice and Police Troy Grant   National 2 April 2015 30 January 2017 1 year, 303 days

Notes

  1. ^ For example the Solicitor General prosecuted the bushrangers the Clarke brothers in 1867,[2] and appeared with the Attorney General in a motion before the full court for a new trial.[3]
  2. ^ Bernhard Wise was the Attorney General and took on the additional responsibilities following the electoral defeat of Robert Fitzgerald.
  3. ^ William McKell was appointed as a Minister without Portfolio to be Assistant Minister of Justice from 12 April 1920,[20] and appointed Minister on 22 December 1920.
  4. ^ Known for 22 days as the Minister for Courts Administration and Corrective Services.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Part 6 Ministries since 1856" (PDF). NSW Parliamentary Record. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  2. ^ "Central criminal court: wounding with intent to murder". The Sydney Morning Herald. 29 May 1867. p. 2. Retrieved 30 December 2020 – via Trove.
  3. ^ "Supreme Court: Queen v Thomas Clarke and another (Bushgrangers)". The Empire. No. 4, 869. New South Wales, Australia. 13 June 1867. p. 5. Retrieved 30 December 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ Mason, Keith, The Office of Solicitor General for New South Wales (PDF) (1988 Autumn) Bar News: Journal of the NSW Bar Association 22.
  5. ^ a b "PFO-5 Justice and Public Instruction". NSW State Records & Archives. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  6. ^ Cowper, Norman & Teale, Ruth (1969). "Allen, Sir George Wigram (1824–1885)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Canberra: National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. pp. 24–25. ISBN 978-0-522-84459-7. ISSN 1833-7538. OCLC 70677943. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  7. ^ a b c "PFO-6 Justice". NSW State Records & Archives. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  8. ^ "PFO-5 Justice and Public Instruction". NSW State Records & Archives. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  9. ^ a b "PFO-6 Justice". NSW State Records & Archives. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  10. ^ Public Instruction Act of 1880 (nsw)
  11. ^ "PFO-20 Police". NSW State Records & Archives. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  12. ^ "PFO-7 Justice". NSW State Records & Archives. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  13. ^ "PFO-285 Justice". NSW State Records & Archives. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  14. ^ "PFO-339 Justice". NSW State Records & Archives. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  15. ^ "Sir George Wigram Allen (1824-1885)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  16. ^ "Mr Joseph Docker (1802–1884)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  17. ^ a b "Sir Francis Bathurst Suttor (1839-1915)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 1 May 2019.
  18. ^ "Sir John Lackey (1830-1903)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 14 June 2019.
  19. ^ "Mr Joseph Leary (1831-1881)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 20 August 2019.
  20. ^ "Appointment of Assistant Minister of Justice (73)". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales. 12 April 1920. p. 2286. Retrieved 10 October 2021 – via Trove.
  21. ^ "Appointment of Minister of Justice (218)". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales. 31 December 1920. p. 7685. Retrieved 10 October 2021 – via Trove.
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Minister for Youth Justice (New South Wales)
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