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List of Catholic dioceses in the United States

Dioceses of the Catholic Church in the United States. White borders demarcate Latin Church dioceses, and black borders demarcate Latin Church provinces.

The Catholic dioceses and archdioceses of the United States which include both the dioceses of the Latin Church, which employ the Roman Rite and other Latin liturgical rites, and various other dioceses, primarily the eparchies of the Eastern Catholic Churches, which employ various Eastern Christian rites and traditions, and which are in full communion with the Pope in Rome. The Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA is not a metropolitan diocese. The Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter, with territory that extends over the United States and Canada, was established on January 1, 2012, for former Anglicans who join the Catholic Church.[1]

The Catholic Church in the United States has a total of 196 particular churches in the 50 U.S. states, Washington D.C., and the U.S. Virgin Islands: 33 territorial archdioceses, 144 territorial dioceses, the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA (serving members of the US Armed Forces and Diplomatic Corps, and those in facilities of the Veterans Administration and their dependents), and the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter (serving Catholics who were formerly Anglicans) within the Latin Church; and two archeparchies and 16 eparchies in the Eastern Catholic Churches.

There are several other dioceses whose territories cover the United States' unincorporated territories. Puerto Rico has one ecclesiastical province comprising an archdiocese and five dioceses, which together form the Puerto Rican Episcopal Conference, which is separate from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.[2] The dioceses that encompass American Samoa, the Northern Mariana Islands, and Guam are part of the Episcopal Conference of the Pacific.

Terminology

The pastor of any particular church other than an ordinariate must be episcopally ordained, but his title conforms to that of his jurisdiction: the pastor of an archdiocese is an archbishop, the pastor of a diocese is a bishop, the pastor of an archeparchy is an archeparch, the pastor of an eparchy is an eparch, and the pastor of an exarchate is an exarch. The pastor of an ordinariate is an "ordinary" (which is a term also used generically for the pastor of any particular church) and may be either a bishop if celibate or a priest if married, but he holds the same power of governance of his ordinariate that an episcopal ordinary has in his diocese in either case; Pope Benedict XVI deliberately instituted this provision to permit married, former Anglican bishops who come into full communion with the Catholic Church along with many of their congregants to accede to office while respecting sensitivities in ecumenical relations with the Eastern Orthodox Churches, which also maintain a celibate episcopacy. The pastor of each particular church is, ex officio, a full member of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). Auxiliary and retired bishops are also members of the Conference but have no vote.

In the United States, each archbishop is also the metropolitan bishop of an ecclesiastical province that encompasses several adjacent dioceses. Likewise, each archeparch is also the metropolitan of an ecclesiastical province that encompasses all of the eparchies of the same sui iuris particular church in the United States. Most provincial and diocesan boundaries conform to state, county, borough (in Alaska), or parish (in Louisiana) political boundaries.[3] The sui iuris Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in the US has an ecclesiastical province consisting of an archeparchy and three eparchies, and the sui iuris Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church has an ecclesiastical province consisting of an archeparchy and three eparchies; the boundaries of these jurisdictions also generally conform to those of states. Most of the remaining eparchies are national in territory, but two particular churches, namely the Armenian Catholic Eparchy of Our Lady of Nareg and the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter, are international, encompassing all of the United States and Canada; their pastors also are ex officio members of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB).

In the Roman Rite, (arch)dioceses customarily take the name of the city of the (arch)bishop's cathedra, denominated the "see". A few dioceses bear the names of two cities, variously reflecting a shift in the major center of population, e.g., the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston; future plan to divide a diocese, e.g., the former Diocese of Reno-Las Vegas; union of two former dioceses, e.g., the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph; political expedience, e.g., the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis; or a perceived need for some episcopal functions to be accessible to residents of another part of the diocesan territory, e.g., the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown. Some of the sui iuris particular churches also follow this custom, while others denominated their jurisdictions after saints or other religious titles.

In the Catholic Church, there are many bishops who do not govern dioceses:

  • A "coadjutor" is appointed to assist the bishop of a diocese or eparchy with its daily governance and has the right of automatic succession upon the death or resignation of the bishop. A coadjutor always holds the title "Coadjutor of [name of see]". The coadjutor of an archdiocese or archeparchy also has the status of an archbishop or archeparch.
  • A retired diocesan bishop holds the title of "Bishop Emeritus of [name of see]" or, in the case of an archdiocese, "Archbishop Emeritus of [name of see]".
  • Auxiliary bishops, bishops who govern jurisdictions that are not canonically erected as dioceses, bishops and archbishops of the Roman Curia, and bishops and archbishops of the diplomatic corps of the Holy See have titles of former dioceses and archdioceses.
  • The Pope also may confer the personal title of "archbishop" on a diocesan bishop who does not govern an archdiocese; such a prelate is classified as an archbishop ad personam: although still merely a diocesan bishop, he is titled with the name of a former archdiocese in addition to possessing the title of his own diocese. Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, Bishop of Rochester and Titular Archbishop of Neoportus was one of the more famous examples of this custom.

When a diocese is suppressed or when the diocesan see is transferred to another location, the title of the former see becomes available for assignment to a titular bishop or, in the case of an archdiocese, a titular archbishop or an archbishop ad personam. The Vatican resurrected the names of many former sees of the United States in the 1990s, as indicated by the table of former dioceses toward the end of this article.

Territorial provinces and dioceses

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

Map Diocese Coat of Arms

Ecclesiastical Province of Anchorage–Juneau[edit]

Archdiocese of Anchorage–Juneau
Diocese of Fairbanks

Ecclesiastical Province of Atlanta[edit]

Archdiocese of Atlanta
Diocese of Charleston
Diocese of Charlotte
Diocese of Raleigh
Diocese of Savannah

Ecclesiastical Province of Baltimore[edit]

Archdiocese of Baltimore
Diocese of Arlington
Diocese of Richmond
Diocese of Wheeling–Charleston
Diocese of Wilmington

Ecclesiastical Province of Boston[edit]

Archdiocese of Boston
Diocese of Burlington
Diocese of Fall River
Diocese of Manchester
Diocese of Portland
Diocese of Springfield in Massachusetts
Diocese of Worcester

Ecclesiastical Province of Chicago[edit]

Archdiocese of Chicago
Diocese of Belleville
Diocese of Joliet
Diocese of Peoria
Diocese of Rockford
Diocese of Springfield in Illinois

Ecclesiastical Province of Cincinnati[edit]

Archdiocese of Cincinnati
Diocese of Cleveland
Diocese of Columbus
Diocese of Steubenville
Diocese of Toledo in Ohio
Diocese of Youngstown

Ecclesiastical Province of Denver[edit]

Archdiocese of Denver
Diocese of Cheyenne
Diocese of Colorado Springs
Diocese of Pueblo

Ecclesiastical Province of Detroit[edit]

Archdiocese of Detroit
Diocese of Gaylord
Diocese of Grand Rapids
Diocese of Kalamazoo
Diocese of Lansing
Diocese of Marquette
Diocese of Saginaw

Ecclesiastical Province of Dubuque[edit]

Archdiocese of Dubuque
Diocese of Davenport
Diocese of Des Moines
Diocese of Sioux City

Ecclesiastical Province of Galveston–Houston[edit]

Archdiocese of Galveston–Houston
Diocese of Austin
Diocese of Beaumont
Diocese of Brownsville
Diocese of Corpus Christi
Diocese of Tyler
Diocese of Victoria

Ecclesiastical Province of Hartford[edit]

Archdiocese of Hartford
Diocese of Bridgeport
Diocese of Norwich
Diocese of Providence

Ecclesiastical Province of Indianapolis[edit]

Archdiocese of Indianapolis
Diocese of Evansville
Diocese of Fort Wayne–South Bend
Diocese of Gary
Diocese of Lafayette in Indiana

Ecclesiastical Province of Kansas City[edit]

Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas
Diocese of Dodge City
Diocese of Salina
Diocese of Wichita

Ecclesiastical Province of Las Vegas[edit]

Archdiocese of Las Vegas
Diocese of Reno
Diocese of Salt Lake City

Ecclesiastical Province of Los Angeles[edit]

Archdiocese of Los Angeles
Diocese of Fresno
Diocese of Monterey
Diocese of Orange
Diocese of San Bernardino
Diocese of San Diego

Ecclesiastical Province of Louisville[edit]

Archdiocese of Louisville
Diocese of Covington
Diocese of Knoxville
Diocese of Lexington
Diocese of Memphis
Diocese of Nashville
Diocese of Owensboro

Ecclesiastical Province of Miami[edit]

Archdiocese of Miami
Diocese of Orlando
Diocese of Palm Beach
Diocese of Pensacola–Tallahassee
Diocese of St. Augustine
Diocese of St. Petersburg
Diocese of Venice in Florida

Ecclesiastical Province of Milwaukee[edit]

Archdiocese of Milwaukee
Diocese of Green Bay
Diocese of La Crosse
Diocese of Madison
Diocese of Superior

Ecclesiastical Province of Mobile[edit]

Archdiocese of Mobile
Diocese of Biloxi
Diocese of Birmingham
Diocese of Jackson

Ecclesiastical Province of New Orleans[edit]

Archdiocese of New Orleans
Diocese of Alexandria
Diocese of Baton Rouge
Diocese of Houma–Thibodaux
Diocese of Lafayette in Louisiana
Diocese of Lake Charles
Diocese of Shreveport

Ecclesiastical Province of New York[edit]

Archdiocese of New York
Diocese of Albany
Diocese of Brooklyn
Diocese of Buffalo
Diocese of Ogdensburg
Diocese of Rochester
Diocese of Rockville Centre
Diocese of Syracuse

Ecclesiastical Province of Newark[edit]

Archdiocese of Newark
Diocese of Camden
Diocese of Metuchen
Diocese of Paterson
Diocese of Trenton

Ecclesiastical Province of Oklahoma City[edit]

Archdiocese of Oklahoma City
Diocese of Little Rock
Diocese of Tulsa

Ecclesiastical Province of Omaha[edit]

Archdiocese of Omaha
Diocese of Grand Island
Diocese of Lincoln

Ecclesiastical Province of Philadelphia[edit]

Archdiocese of Philadelphia
Diocese of Allentown
Diocese of Altoona–Johnstown
Diocese of Erie
Diocese of Greensburg
Diocese of Harrisburg
Diocese of Pittsburgh
Diocese of Scranton

Ecclesiastical Province of Portland[edit]

Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon
Diocese of Baker
Diocese of Boise
Diocese of Great Falls–Billings
Diocese of Helena

Ecclesiastical Province of St. Louis[edit]

Archdiocese of St. Louis
Diocese of Jefferson City
Diocese of Kansas City–Saint Joseph
Diocese of Springfield–Cape Girardeau

Ecclesiastical Province of Saint Paul and Minneapolis[edit]

Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis
Diocese of Bismarck
Diocese of Crookston
Diocese of Duluth
Diocese of Fargo
Diocese of New Ulm
Diocese of Rapid City
Diocese of Saint Cloud
Diocese of Sioux Falls
Diocese of Winona–Rochester

Ecclesiastical Province of San Antonio[edit]

Archdiocese of San Antonio
Diocese of Amarillo
Diocese of Dallas
Diocese of El Paso
Diocese of Fort Worth
Diocese of Laredo
Diocese of Lubbock
Diocese of San Angelo

Ecclesiastical Province of San Francisco[edit]

Archdiocese of San Francisco
Diocese of Honolulu
Diocese of Oakland
Diocese of Sacramento
Diocese of San Jose
Diocese of Santa Rosa
Diocese of Stockton

Ecclesiastical Province of Santa Fe[edit]

Archdiocese of Santa Fe
Diocese of Gallup
Diocese of Las Cruces
Diocese of Phoenix
Diocese of Tucson

Ecclesiastical Province of Seattle[edit]

Archdiocese of Seattle
Diocese of Spokane
Diocese of Yakima

Ecclesiastical Province of Washington[edit]

Archdiocese of Washington
Diocese of Saint Thomas

Puerto Rican Episcopal Conference

Map Diocese Coat of Arms

Ecclesiastical Province of San Juan[edit]

Archdiocese of San Juan
Diocese of Arecibo
Diocese of Caguas
Diocese of Fajardo–Humacao
Diocese of Mayagüez
Diocese of Ponce

Episcopal Conference of the Pacific

Map Diocese Coat of Arms

Ecclesiastical Province of Agaña[edit]

Archdiocese of Agaña
Diocese of Chalan Kanoa

Ecclesiastical Province of Samoa–Apia[edit]

Diocese of Samoa–Pago Pago

Military archdiocese

Members of the Armed Forces of the United States and their dependents, employees of the US Veterans Health Administration and its patients, and Americans in civil service overseas, including the Nation's diplomatic corps and their dependents, both Catholics of the Latin Church and Eastern Churches, are served by the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA. An archbishop leads it who is presently assisted by four auxiliary bishops. Its status as an "archdiocese" is merely honorary. In 1986, Pope John Paul II amended the juridical organization of military chaplaincies from "military vicariates" to "military ordinariates",[4] the head of which was likened to a diocesan bishop. The Ordinary of the Archdiocese of the Military Services is usually granted the personal title of "Archbishop", although this is not a requisite of the office.

Eastern Catholic eparchies

Province of Philadelphia (Ukrainian)

The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in the United States is organized into a metropolia (province) comprising a metropolitan archeparchy and three suffragan eparchies.

Metropolia Map Eparchy
Philadelphia Archeparchy of Philadelphia
Eparchy of Chicago
Eparchy of Parma
Eparchy of Stamford

Province of Pittsburgh (Ruthenian)

The Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church in the United States is organized into the sui iuris Province of Pittsburgh, consisting of a metropolitan archeparchy and three suffragan eparchies. The eparchies also serve the faithful of other Byzantine Catholic Churches without established hierarchies in the United States, namely those of the Albanian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Greek, Hungarian, Italo-Albanian, Macedonian, Russian, and Slovakian Byzantine Catholic Churches. Since 2022, this province includes also the Slovakian Catholic Exarchate of Saints Cyril and Methodius of Toronto in Canada, which was formerly part of the Slovakian Greek Catholic Church.[5]

Metropolia Map Eparchy
Pittsburgh Archeparchy of Pittsburgh
Eparchy of Parma
Eparchy of Passaic
Eparchy of Phoenix
Exarchate of Toronto (Canada)

Eastern Catholic eparchies in the United States immediately subject to the Holy See

The following particular Eastern Catholic Churches are not suffragan to metropolitan sees, but are instead exempt and therefore immediately subject to the Holy See, while they still remain part of their respective patriarchal, major archiepiscopal, or other rite- and tradition-specific particular churches.

Church Eparchy
Chaldean Catholic Church Eparchy of St. Thomas the Apostle of Detroit
Eparchy of St. Peter the Apostle of San Diego
Maronite Church Eparchy of St. Maron of Brooklyn
Eparchy of Our Lady of Lebanon of Los Angeles
Melkite Greek Catholic Church Eparchy of Newton
Syriac Catholic Church Eparchy of Our Lady of Deliverance in the United States
Syro-Malabar Catholic Church Eparchy of St. Thomas of Chicago

Eastern Catholic eparchies comprising the United States and Canada, and immediately subject to the Holy See

Several Eastern Catholic Churches have jurisdictions that include members and congregations in both the United States and Canada.

Church Eparchy
Armenian Catholic Church Eparchy of Our Lady of Nareg of the US and Canada
Romanian Catholic Church Eparchy of St George's in Canton
Syro-Malankara Catholic Church Eparchy of St. Mary, Queen of Peace of the US and Canada

Personal ordinariate (Anglican Use)

Under the provisions of Anglicanorum Coetibus of 2009, an effort was underway to establish a personal ordinariate, or diocese, in the United States. The ordinariate was formed for former Anglicans, including members from the Episcopal Church, Continuing Anglican churches, and already Catholic Anglican Use parishes. The first such ordinariate established was the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham in the United Kingdom. The personal ordinariate encompassing the whole United States, the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter, was instituted on January 1, 2012, in accordance with Anglicanorum Coetibus.[1] It was later expanded to include Canada, and so its ordinary is admitted to the two countries' bishops' conferences.

Ecclesiastical
Province Map
Diocese Diocese Coat
of Arms
Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter

Former US dioceses

Diocese Cathedral History Ref.
Diocese of Allegheny St. Peter Church •1876.01.11: Established as the Diocese of Allegheny with territory from the Diocese of Pittsburgh
•1889.07.01: Suppressed, with its territory returned to the Diocese of Pittsburgh
•1971: Title of Bishop of Allegheny Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[6]
Diocese of Alton Church of Sts. Peter and Paul •1853.07.29: Established as the Diocese of Quincy, with territory from the Diocese of Chicago
•1857.01.09: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Alton
•1887.01.07: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Belleville
•1923.10.26: See Transferred and Title Changed to the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois
•1995: Title of Bishop of Alton Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[7]
Diocese of Bardstown Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral •1808.04.08: Established as the Diocese of Bardstown with territory from the Diocese of Baltimore
•1821.06.19: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Cincinnati
•1834.05.06: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Vincennes
•1837.07.28: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Nashville
•1841.02.13: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Louisville
•1937: Elevated to Archdiocese
•1995: Title of Bishop of Bardstown Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[8]
Diocese of Both Californias •1840.04.27: Established as the Diocese of Both Californias with territory from the Diocese of Sonora
•1849.11.20: Title Changed to Diocese of Monterey
•1859: Title Changed to Diocese of Monterey-Los Angeles
•1892: Title Changed to Diocese of Los Angeles-San Diego
•1922: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Monterrey-Fresno
•1936: Elevated to Archdiocese; lost territory to establish the Diocese of San Diego
•1976: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Orange
1978: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of San Bernardino
•1996: Title of Bishop of Both Californias Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[9][10]
Diocese of Concordia Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church •1887.08.02: Established as the Diocese of Concordia with territory from the Diocese of Leavenworth
•1944.12.23: See transferred and title changed to Diocese of Salina
•1995: Title of Bishop of Concordia Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[11]
Diocese of Grass Valley St. Patrick Church •1860.09.27: Established as the Apostolic Vicariate of Marysville with territory from the Metropolitan Archdiocese of San Francisco
•1868.03.22: Promoted as Diocese of Grass Valley
•1886.05.28: Title Changed to Diocese of Sacramento
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Grass Valley
[12]
Diocese of Jamestown St. James Church •1889.11.10: Established as the Diocese of Jamestown with territory from the Apostolic Vicariate of Dakota
•1897.04.06: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Fargo
•1995: Title of Bishop of Jamestown Restored as Titular Episcopal
[13]
Diocese of Juneau Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary •1951.06.23: Established as Diocese of Juneau from Apostolic Vicariate of Alaska
•1966.01.22: Lost territory to establish Metropolitan Archdiocese of Anchorage
•2020.05.19: Suppressed to Metropolitan Archdiocese of Anchorage–Juneau
[14]
Diocese of Kearney St. James Church •1912.03.08: Established as the Diocese of Kearney with territory from the Diocese of Omaha
•1917.04.11: See transferred and title changed to Diocese of Grand Island
•1995: Title of Bishop of Kearney Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[15]
Diocese of Lead St. Patrick Church •1902.08.04: Established as the Diocese of Lead with territory from the Diocese of Sioux Falls
•1930.08.01: See transferred and title changed to Diocese of Rapid City
•1995: Title of Bishop of Lead Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[16]
Diocese of Leavenworth Church of the Immaculate Conception •1850.07.19: Established as the Apostolic Vicariate of Indian Territory East of the Rocky Mountains with territory from the Archdiocese of St Louis
•1857.01.06: Lost territory to establish the Apostolic Vicariate of Nebraska
•1857: Title changed to Apostolic Vicariate of Kansas
•1877.05.22: Promoted as Diocese of Leavenworth
•1887.08.02: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Wichita and Diocese of Concordia
•1891.05.29: Title Changed to Diocese of Kansas City, Kansas
•1897.03.05: Title Changed to Diocese of Leavenworth
•1947.05.10: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Kansas City in Kansas
•1952: Elevated to Archdiocese
•1995: Title of Bishop of Leavenworth Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[17]
Diocese of Natchez St. Mary Basilica •1826.07.18: Established as the Apostolic Vicariate of Mississippi with territory from the Diocese of Louisiana
•1837.07.28: Promoted as Diocese of Natchez
•1956.12.18: Title Changed to Diocese of Natchez–Jackson
•1977.03.01: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Natchez; lost territory to establish the Diocese of Biloxi and Diocese of Jackson
•1977.03.01: Title of Bishop of Natchez Designated as Titular Episcopal See
[18]
Diocese of Natchitoches Basilica of the Immaculate Conception •1853.07.29: Established as the Diocese of Natchitoches with territory from the Metropolitan Archdiocese of New Orleans
•1910.08.06: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Alexandria
•1977: Title Changed to Diocese of Alexandria-Shreveport
•1986: Title Changed to Diocese of Alexandria; lost territory to establish the Diocese of Shreveport
•1995: Title of Bishop of Natchitoches Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[19]
Diocese of Nesqually Proto-Cathedral of St. James the Greater •1850.05.31: Established as the Diocese of Nesqually with territory from the Diocese of Walla Walla
•1853.07.29: Gained territory from the suppressed Diocese of Walla Walla
•1907.09.11: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Seattle
•1951: Elevated as Archdiocese of Seattle
•1995: Title of Bishop of Nesqually Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[20]
Diocese of Oregon City St. John the Apostle Church •1843.12.01: Established as the Apostolic Vicariate of Oregon with territory from the Metropolitan Archdiocese of Baltimore and Archdiocese of Quebec
•1846.07.24: Promoted as Diocese of Oregon City; lost territory to establish the Diocese of Vancouver Island and Diocese of Walla Walla
•1850.07.29: Elevated to Metropolitan Archdiocese of Oregon City
•1868.03.03: Lost territory to establish the Apostolic Vicariate of Idaho and Montana
•1894: Gained territory from the Diocese of Vancouver Island
•1903.06.19: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Baker City
•1928.09.26: See Transferred and Title Changed to Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon
•1996: Title of Archbishop of Oregon City Restored as Titular Metropolitan See
[21]
Diocese of Quincy •1853.07.29: Established as the Diocese of Quincy with territory from the Diocese of Chicago
•1857.01.09: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Alton
•1887.01.07: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Belleville
•1923.10.26: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Springfield in Illinois
•1995: Title of Bishop of Alton Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[22]
Diocese of Saint Joseph •1868.03.03: Established as Diocese of Saint Joseph with territory from the Archdiocese of Saint Louis
•1956.07.02: Suppressed, merged with the Diocese of Kansas City(Mo.) to form the Diocese of Kansas City–Saint Joseph, and lost territory to establish Diocese of Jefferson City and Diocese of Springfield–Cape Girardeau
Diocese of Sault Sainte Marie Holy Name of Mary Pro-Cathedral •1853.07.29: Established as the Apostolic Vicariate of Upper Michigan with territory from the Diocese of Detroit
•1857.01.09: Elevated as Diocese of Sault Sainte Marie
•1865.10.23: Title Changed to Diocese of Sault Sainte Marie–Marquette
•1937.01.03: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Marquette
•1995: Title of Bishop of Sault Sainte Marie Restored as Titular Episcopal See
•1996: Title of Titular See Changed to Bishop of Sault Sainte Marie in Michigan
[23]
Diocese of Vincennes Basilica of St. Francis Xavier •1834.05.06: Established as the Diocese of Vincennes with territory from the Diocese of Bardstown
•1857.01.08: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Fort Wayne
•1898.03.28: See Transferred and Title Changed to Diocese of Indianapolis
•1944: Elevated to Metropolitan Archdiocese of Indianapolis; lost territory to establish the Diocese of Evansville
•1995: Title of Bishop of Vincennes Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[24]
Diocese of Walla Walla •1846.07.24: Established as the Diocese of Walla Walla with territory from the Apostolic Vicariate of Oregon
•1850.05.31: Lost territory to establish the Diocese of Nesqually
•1853.07.29: Suppressed, with territory annexed to the Diocese of Nesqually
•1971: Title of Bishop of Walla Walla Restored as Titular Episcopal See
[25]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Cardinal Levada, William (January 1, 2012). "Decree of Erection of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter" (PDF). Holy See. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 27, 2012. ((cite journal)): Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. ^ Conferencia Episcopal Puertorriqueña (C.E.P.). GCatholic.org website. Retrieved 2011-02-13.
  3. ^ For exceptions, see Provincial Boundary Lines.
  4. ^ "Constitutio apostolica Spirituali militum curae, die XXIV mensis Aprilis, anno Domini MCMLXXXVI – Ioannes Paulus II". w2.vatican.va.
  5. ^ "Rinunce e nomine, 03.03.2022". 3 March 2022. Retrieved 4 March 2022.
  6. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Allegheny". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 22 February 2016.
  7. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Alton". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 22 February 2016.
  8. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Bardstown". GCatholic.org.
  9. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Both Californias". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Archived from the original on 9 March 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  10. ^ "California". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 21 January 2015.
  11. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Concordia". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  12. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Grass Valley". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  13. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Jamestown". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  14. ^ "Diocese of Juneau". GCatholic.org. 19 May 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  15. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Kearney". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  16. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Lead". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  17. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Leavenworth". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  18. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Natchez". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  19. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Nachitoches". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  20. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Nesqually". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  21. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Oregon City". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  22. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Quincy". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  23. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Sault Sainte Marie". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  24. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Vincennes". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  25. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Walla Walla". GCatholic.org. 21 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.
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List of Catholic dioceses in the United States
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Get ready for Wikiwand 2.0 🎉! the new version arrives on September 1st! Don't want to wait?