For faster navigation, this Iframe is preloading the Wikiwand page for Arnaud Démare.

Arnaud Démare

Arnaud Démare
Démare at the 2015 Tour de France
Personal information
Full nameArnaud Démare
Born (1991-08-26) 26 August 1991 (age 32)
Beauvais, France
Height1.82 m (5 ft 11+12 in)
Weight76 kg (168 lb; 12 st 0 lb)
Team information
Current teamArkéa–B&B Hotels
DisciplineRoad
RoleRider
Rider typeSprinter
Amateur teams
2008–2009Team Wasquehal
2010–2011CC Nogent-sur-Oise
2011FDJ (stagiaire)
Professional teams
2012–2023Groupama–FDJ[1][2]
2023–Arkéa–Samsic
Major wins
Grand Tours
Tour de France
2 individual stages (2017, 2018)
Giro d'Italia
Points classification (2020, 2022)
8 individual stages (2019, 2020, 2022)

Stage races

Four Days of Dunkirk (2013, 2014)
Tour de Wallonie (2020)
Boucles de la Mayenne (2021)

One-day races and Classics

National Road Race Championships
(2014, 2017, 2020)
Milan–San Remo (2016)
Hamburg Cyclassics (2012)
Paris–Tours (2021, 2022)
Brussels Cycling Classic (2017, 2023)
GP de Denain (2013, 2017)
London–Surrey Classic (2013)
Milano–Torino (2020)
Medal record
Men's road bicycle racing
Representing  France
World Championships
Gold medal – first place 2011 Copenhagen Under-23 road race
European Championships
Silver medal – second place 2020 Plouay Elite road race
Silver medal – second place 2022 Munich Elite road race

Arnaud Démare (born 26 August 1991) is a professional road racing cyclist who currently rides for UCI WorldTeam Arkéa–B&B Hotels.[3] In 2011 he won the UCI World Under-23 Road Race Championships,[4] and in 2016 he won the Milan–San Remo. He is one of five riders to have won the French National Road Race Championships three times, having won the race in 2014, 2017 and 2020.

Career

2012 season

Démare celebrating victory on the final stage of the 2012 Tour of Qatar

In August 2012, Démare won the first World Tour race of his career by prevailing in the Vattenfall Cyclassics, ahead of local favorite André Greipel and Giacomo Nizzolo.[5] Démare clearly dominated the mass sprint contested in scorching heat at the end of the 245.6 km (152.6 mi) race.[6] That year, he also participated in the Olympic road race, finishing 30th.[7]

2013 season

In 2013, Démare won 3 stages in a row at the Four Days of Dunkirk and the general classification.[8] On the third stage, his team-mate and lead-out rider Geoffrey Soupe produced a final power surge to launch Démare, and the duo finished one-two in the mass sprint, with Ramon Sinkeldam of Argos–Shimano taking third place.[9]

2014 season

Démare won the Four Days of Dunkirk stage race for the second year in succession, winning two stages during the event. He also won the points and young rider classifications.[10] He also put in some strong performances in the cobbled classics, finishing second in Gent–Wevelgem and twelfth in Paris–Roubaix.[11]

2015 season

Démare at the 2014 Tour de France wearing the French national champion's jersey

Démare struggled for form for much of the 2015 season, only scoring one top ten finish in the spring classics with a tenth place in Omloop Het Nieuwsblad. He did however manage to score two stage wins in the Tour of Belgium.[11]

2016 season

In January 2016 Démare announced his race plans for the first half of the new season, starting his campaign on home soil at the Étoile de Bessèges and Tour Méditerranéen, followed by competing in the cobbled classics of Omloop Het Nieuwsblad, Kuurne–Brussels–Kuurne, Milan–San Remo, Gent–Wevelgem, Tour of Flanders and Paris–Roubaix, along with the stage races Paris–Nice and the Three Days of De Panne.[11] He also announced that he would skip the Tour de France and focus on the Giro d'Italia instead.[12] He enjoyed success at the Tour Méditerranéen, where his FDJ squad won the race's opening team time trial and he won the following stage.[13] Démare went on to win the first full stage of Paris–Nice[14] and then took the biggest win of his career at the Milan–San Remo. His victory was questioned by rival riders Matteo Tosatto and Eros Capecchi, who alleged that Démare had been assisted by a tow from a team car on the climb up the Cipressa after he crashed with 30 kilometres (19 miles) to go. However, in the absence of any photographic or video evidence, race officials decided not to take any action.[15] Démare became the first Frenchman to win the Milan-San Remo since Laurent Jalabert in 1995. He was also the first Frenchman to win a Monument race since 1997, when Jalabert and Frédéric Guesdon had won the Giro di Lombardia and Paris–Roubaix respectively.[16]

2017 season

Démare at the 2017 Tour de France

On 4 July, two days after finishing Stage 2 in second position behind Marcel Kittel, Démare clinched his first Tour de France or Grand Tour stage win by winning the Tour de France's fourth stage that ended in a hectic sprint into Vittel; it was the first stage victory by a Frenchman in a bunch sprint since Jimmy Casper won Stage 1 that started and ended in Strasbourg in 2006.[17] In Stage 6, Démare was edged out again into a second-place finish by Marcel Kittel, who launched a perfectly timed late sprint with around 200 metres to go.[18] Démare was ill during the mountainous Stage 8 and fell back very early. Two teammates were with him trying to bring him in within the time limit. He eventually finished in 188th position, 37 minutes and 33 seconds behind the Stage 8 winner.[19] Démare, who was sitting in second position in the points classification at the start of the Stage 9, finished that challenging mountain stage in a group around 40 minutes behind the Stage 9 winner. That put him outside the time limit, and therefore out of the Tour de France, along with six other riders.[20]

2018 season

After finishing second to Dylan Groenewegen at Kuurne–Brussels–Kuurne,[21] Démare took his first victory of the season with an opening-day stage win at Paris–Nice.[22] He took third-place finishes on consecutive March weekends at Milan–San Remo and Gent–Wevelgem,[23][24] but it was not until June before he took another victory, winning the penultimate stage of the Tour de Suisse.[25] At the Tour de France, he was third on the second and thirteenth stages,[26][27] before he took his second Tour de France stage win, on stage eighteen into Pau,[28] following a lead-out from teammate Jacopo Guarnieri. With a further third-place finish on the final stage, Démare finished third in the points classification.[29] He was second at the EuroEyes Cyclassics,[30] before he completed a clean sweep at the Tour Poitou-Charentes en Nouvelle-Aquitaine, winning all five stages on his way to the overall victory.[31]

2019 season

Démare (right) at the 2019 Giro d'Italia. He won a stage, and wore the maglia ciclamino (English: cyclamen jersey) of points classification leader for seven days during the race.

Démare's first victory of the 2019 season came during the tenth stage of the Giro d'Italia, which ended on the streets of Modena, prevailing in a bunch sprint ahead of Elia Viviani.[32] He took the lead of the points classification the following day,[33] which he held for seven stages, but ultimately finished second to Pascal Ackermann – a rider he had criticised following his Modena stage victory.[34] He then won two stages and the points classification at the Route d'Occitanie,[35][36] and also won a stage at the Tour de Wallonie.[37] Démare's final win of the season came at September's Okolo Slovenska, where he won the penultimate stage and the points classification; he finished second overall, one second in arrears of race winner Yves Lampaert.[38][39]

2020 season

After competing at the UAE Tour prior to the COVID-19 pandemic-enforced suspension of racing, Démare's first win of 2020 came at Milano–Torino,[40] which was held on a flatter parcours compared to previous years, as it was held as a midweek precursor to Milan–San Remo three days later.[41] Over the rest of August, Démare took eight further victories – two stage wins and the general classification at the Tour de Wallonie,[42][43] the French National Road Race Championships (becoming the fifth rider to win the race at least three times),[44] and three stage wins and the general classification at the Tour Poitou-Charentes en Nouvelle-Aquitaine, overhauling Josef Černý on the final day in the latter.[45][46][47] He also won a silver medal in the road race at the UEC European Road Championships, held in Plouay, France, just behind Italy's Giacomo Nizzolo.[48]

After a stage win in September's Tour de Luxembourg,[49] Démare returned to the Giro d'Italia in October, as one of the contenders for the points classification jersey.[50] Démare won his first stage of the race on stage four, winning a bunch sprint into Villafranca Tirrena.[51] Démare then won the next two bunch sprints on stages six and seven into Matera and Brindisi respectively,[52][53] taking and solidifying his lead in the points classification, and as a result, becoming the first rider since Robbie McEwen in 2006 to win three stages in the opening week of the Giro d'Italia. He added a fourth stage victory on stage eleven into Rimini, again in a bunch sprint,[54] and ultimately held the points classification lead until the finish in Milan; he finished 49 points ahead of his closest challenger, Peter Sagan.[55] Démare finished the 2020 season with fourteen victories, two more than any other rider.[56]

2021 season

Démare took his first win of the season in April at the one-day race, La Roue Tourangelle, beating Nacer Bouhanni in a sprint finish.[57] He then won two stages and the points classification in the Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana,[58][59] and in May, won the last three stages of the Boucles de la Mayenne on his way to winning the general and points classifications at the race.[60][61][62] He won the second stage of the Route d'Occitanie,[63] before competing in the Tour de France for the first time since 2018. Démare recorded a single top-ten stage finish (fourth) on stage six, and finished outside of the time limit three stages later, ending his race early.[64] He made his first start at the Vuelta a España, looking to complete the triptych of winning a stage at all three Grand Tours.[65] The closest he came was a second-place finish to Fabio Jakobsen on the fourth stage,[66] and he finished inside the top-100 of a Grand Tour general classification for the first time. He finished the season with a second-place finish at Paris–Bourges,[67] and victory in Paris–Tours, winning out of a four-rider group that had broken clear towards the end of the race.[68] He became the first French rider to win the race for fifteen years.[69]

2022 season

Early in the season, Demare finished in 10th place in both Milan-San Remo and Gent Wevelgem. During the 2022 Giro d'Italia he rode very strongly winning three stages as well as the points classification.[70] His victory on stage 13 of the Giro was the 10th grand tour stage win of his career.

Major results

2008
Tour de l'Abitibi
1st Points classification
1st Stage 1
1st Stage 4 Coupe des Nations Abitibi
9th Bernaudeau Junior
2009
2nd Road race, UCI Junior World Championships
2nd Paris–Roubaix Juniors
3rd Road race, UEC European Junior Road Championships
3rd Overall Tour d'Istrie
1st Stage 3
3rd Bernaudeau Junior
6th Overall GP Général Patton
9th Overall Tour De Lorraine Juniors
2010
1st Grand Prix de la ville de Pérenchies
1st Stage 4 Coupe des nations Ville Saguenay
5th Road race, UCI Under-23 Road World Championships
8th La Côte Picarde
9th Paris–Tours Espoirs
10th ZLM Tour
10th Grand Prix de la Ville de Lillers
2011
1st Road race, UCI Under-23 Road World Championships
1st La Côte Picarde
1st Ronde Pévéloise
Coupe des nations Ville Saguenay
1st Stages 1 & 4
1st Stage 3 Tour Alsace
4th Paris–Roubaix Espoirs
4th ZLM Tour
2012 (6 pro wins)
1st Vattenfall Cyclassics
1st Le Samyn
1st Cholet-Pays de Loire
1st Stage 6 Tour of Qatar
1st Stage 2 Route du Sud
2nd Road race, National Road Championships
2nd Halle–Ingooigem
4th Kuurne–Brussels–Kuurne
4th Tro-Bro Léon
4th GP de Denain Porte du Hainaut
9th Overall Driedaagse van West-Vlaanderen
1st Points classification
1st Stage 2
2013 (9)
1st Overall Four Days of Dunkirk
1st Points classification
1st Young rider classification
1st Stages 1, 2 & 3
1st Grand Prix de Denain
1st RideLondon–Surrey Classic
1st Grand Prix d'Isbergues
1st Grote Prijs Beeckman-De Caluwé
1st Stage 4 Tour de Suisse
1st Stage 2 Eneco Tour
2nd Paris–Bourges
3rd Paris–Tours
9th Overall Tour de l'Eurométropole
9th Omloop van het Houtland
10th Vattenfall Cyclassics
2014 (15)
1st Road race, National Road Championships
1st Overall Four Days of Dunkirk
1st Points classification
1st Young rider classification
1st Stages 1 & 2
1st Overall Tour de l'Eurométropole
1st Points classification
1st Young rider classification
1st Stages 1, 2 & 4
1st Overall Tour de Picardie
1st Points classification
1st Stages 2 & 3
1st Halle–Ingooigem
1st Kampioenschap van Vlaanderen
1st Grand Prix d'Isbergues
1st Stage 6 Tour of Qatar
2nd Gent–Wevelgem
3rd Brussels Cycling Classic
10th Omloop Het Nieuwsblad
2015 (2)
Tour of Belgium
1st Stages 2 & 3
4th Paris–Bourges
4th Tour de Vendée
6th Vattenfall Cyclassics
10th Omloop Het Nieuwsblad
2016 (5)
1st Milan–San Remo
1st Binche–Chimay–Binche
La Méditerranéenne
1st Stages 1 (TTT) & 2
1st Stage 1 Paris–Nice
Route du Sud
1st Points classification
1st Stage 5
2nd Paris–Tours
2nd Brussels Cycling Classic
5th Gent–Wevelgem
6th Grand Prix de Fourmies
8th Halle–Ingooigem
2017 (10)
1st Road race, National Road Championships
1st Brussels Cycling Classic
1st Grand Prix de Denain
1st Halle–Ingooigem
Tour de France
1st Stage 4
Held after Stages 4–6
Critérium du Dauphiné
1st Points classification
1st Stage 2
Étoile de Bessèges
1st Stages 1 & 4
1st Stage 1 Paris–Nice
1st Stage 2 Four Days of Dunkirk
2nd EuroEyes Cyclassics
6th Kuurne–Brussels–Kuurne
6th Milan–San Remo
6th Paris–Roubaix
7th Tro-Bro Léon
2018 (9)
1st Overall Tour Poitou-Charentes en Nouvelle-Aquitaine
1st Points classification
1st Stages 1, 2, 3, 4 (ITT) & 5
1st Stage 18 Tour de France
1st Stage 1 Paris–Nice
1st Stage 8 Tour de Suisse
2nd EuroEyes Cyclassics
2nd Kuurne–Brussels–Kuurne
2nd Grand Prix de Fourmies
3rd Milan–San Remo
3rd Gent–Wevelgem
9th Omloop Het Nieuwsblad
2019 (5)
Giro d'Italia
1st Stage 10
Held after Stages 11–17
Route d'Occitanie
1st Points classification
1st Stages 2 & 4
1st Stage 4 Tour de Wallonie
2nd Overall Okolo Slovenska
1st Points classification
1st Stage 3
4th Paris–Tours
6th Brussels Cycling Classic
6th Paris–Chauny
8th EuroEyes Cyclassics
9th Road race, UEC European Road Championships
2020 (14)
1st Road race, National Road Championships
1st Overall Tour Poitou-Charentes en Nouvelle-Aquitaine
1st Points classification
1st Stages 1, 2 & 5
1st Overall Tour de Wallonie
1st Points classification
1st Stages 2 & 4
1st Milano–Torino
Giro d'Italia
1st Points classification
1st Stages 4, 6, 7 & 11
1st Stage 2 Tour de Luxembourg
2nd Road race, UEC European Road Championships
5th Paris–Chauny
2021 (9)
1st Overall Boucles de la Mayenne
1st Points classification
1st Stages 2, 3 & 4
1st Paris–Tours
1st La Roue Tourangelle
Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana
1st Points classification
1st Stages 2 & 5
1st Stage 2 Route d'Occitanie
2nd Paris–Bourges
5th Grand Prix d'Isbergues
6th Grand Prix de Denain
2022 (7)
1st Paris–Tours
1st Grand Prix d'Isbergues
Giro d'Italia
1st Points classification
1st Stages 5, 6 & 13
Tour de Pologne
1st Points classification
1st Stage 7
1st Stage 1 Route d'Occitanie
2nd Road race, UEC European Road Championships
2nd Primus Classic
2nd Egmont Cycling Race
2nd Druivenkoers Overijse
2nd Paris–Bourges
6th Classic Brugge–De Panne
7th Paris–Chauny
10th Milan–San Remo
10th Gent–Wevelgem
2023 (4)
1st Brussels Cycling Classic
1st Paris–Bourges
1st Tour de Vendée
2nd Overall Boucles de la Mayenne
1st Points classification
1st Stage 2
3rd Grand Prix d'Isbergues
4th Hamburg Cyclassics
7th Grand Prix de Fourmies
8th Paris–Tours
2024
5th Trofeo Palma

Grand Tour general classification results timeline

Grand Tour 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
A pink jersey Giro d'Italia DNF DNF 123 121 130
A yellow jersey Tour de France 159 138 DNF 141 DNF
A red jersey Vuelta a España 96

Classics results timeline

Monument 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Milan–San Remo 129 34 127 1 6 3 32 24 26 10 51
Tour of Flanders 24 DNF 23 DNF 56 15 28
Paris–Roubaix 90 12 37 6 61 17 NH 34
Liège–Bastogne–Liège Has not contested during career
Giro di Lombardia
Classic 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Omloop Het Nieuwsblad 10 10 82 20 9
Kuurne–Brussels–Kuurne 4 NH 22 11 6 2 37
Milano–Torino 1
E3 Saxo Bank Classic 101 56 34 NH
Gent–Wevelgem 143 12 2 15 5 78 3 67 44 10 79
Hamburg Cyclassics 1 10 45 6 34 2 2 8 Not held DNF 4
Brussels Cycling Classic 70 12 3 99 2 1 75 6 1
Paris–Tours 3 42 12 2 14 4 1 1 6

Major championships timeline

Event 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Olympic Games Road race 30 Not held Not held NH
World Championships Road race 38 DNF 56
European Championships Road race Race did not exist 9 2 2
National Championships Road race 2 20 1 50 DNF 1 14 11 1 DNF 6
Legend
Did not compete
DNF Did not finish
DNS Did not start
OTL Over the limit
NH Not held

References

  1. ^ "Groupama-FDJ confirm 28 riders for 2019". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 15 November 2018. Retrieved 3 January 2019.
  2. ^ "Groupama - FDJ". UCI.org. Union Cycliste Internationale. Archived from the original on 2 January 2020. Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  3. ^ Ryan, Barry (1 August 2023). "Arnaud Demare joins Arkea-Samsic from Groupama-FDJ with immediate effect". cyclingnews.com. Cycling News. Retrieved 1 August 2023.
  4. ^ Arnaud Demare Wins U23 World Road Race Archived September 25, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Susan Westemeyer (19 August 2012). "Demare wins Vattenfalls Cyclassics". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 20 August 2012.
  6. ^ "Greipel to miss World Championships in Limburg". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. 20 August 2012. Retrieved 20 August 2012.
  7. ^ "Arnaud Demare Bio, Stats, and Results | Olympics at Sports-Reference.com". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 3 December 2016. Retrieved 24 December 2021.
  8. ^ "Kreder wins fourth stage in Dunkerque". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 4 May 2013. Retrieved 4 May 2013.
  9. ^ "Four Days of Demare in Liévin". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 3 May 2013. Retrieved 3 May 2013.
  10. ^ Axelgaard, Emil (11 May 2014). "Engoulvent and Demare share the spoils in Dunkirk". CyclingQuotes. JJnet.dk A/S. Retrieved 11 May 2014.
  11. ^ a b c "Demare details 2016 race programme - News Shorts". cyclingnews.com. 13 January 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  12. ^ Cossins, Peter (18 January 2016). "Demare opts for Giro d'Italia instead of Tour de France". cyclingnews.com. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  13. ^ "Demare wins stage 2 at La Méditerranéenne". cyclingnews.com. 12 February 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  14. ^ "Paris-Nice: Team Sky's Ben Swift pipped by Arnaud Demare". bbc.co.uk. 7 March 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  15. ^ "Demare hits back at Milan-San Remo tow allegations". cyclingnews.com. 20 March 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  16. ^ "Arnaud Démare remporte Milan - San Remo !". L'Équipe. 19 March 2016.
  17. ^ "Tour de France: Demare wins in Vittel – French champion takes stage 4 victory in crash-marred sprint". www.cyclingnews.com. 4 July 2017.
  18. ^ "Marcel Kittel Wins Stage 6 of 2017 Tour de France Ahead of Arnaud Demare". Bleacher Report. 6 July 2017.
  19. ^ "Tour de France: Calmejane wins stage 8 - GC unchanged in blisteringly fast stage in the Jura mountains". www.cyclingnews.com. 8 July 2017.
  20. ^ "Tour de France: Demare, Trentin, Renshaw and others finish outside time limit on stage 9". www.cyclingnews.com. 9 July 2017.
  21. ^ Robertshaw, Henry (25 February 2018). "Dylan Groenewegen sprints to Kuurne-Brussels-Kuurne victory as breakaway caught with 150m to go". Cycling Weekly. TI Media. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  22. ^ Charles, Andy (4 March 2018). "Arnaud Demare takes Paris-Nice lead with thrilling first-stage victory". Sky Sports. Sky UK. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  23. ^ "Vincenzo Nibali wins Milan-San Remo". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 17 March 2018. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  24. ^ "Peter Sagan wins Gent-Wevelgem". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 25 March 2018. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  25. ^ "Tour de Suisse: Demare wins stage 8 in Bellinzona". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 16 June 2018. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  26. ^ Whittle, Jeremy (8 July 2018). "Peter Sagan sprints to victory on stage two to take Tour de France yellow jersey". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  27. ^ Frattini, Kirsten (20 July 2018). "Tour de France: Peter Sagan wins stage 13 bunch sprint in Valence". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  28. ^ Ingle, Sean (26 July 2018). "Tour de France: Arnaud Démare shrugs off André Greipel row to win stage 18". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  29. ^ Ostanek, Daniel (29 July 2018). "Geraint Thomas wins 2018 Tour de France". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  30. ^ Westemeyer, Susan (19 August 2018). "Viviani wins EuroEyes Cyclassics Hamburg". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  31. ^ "Tour du Poitou-Charentes : le Grand Chelem pour Arnaud Démare" [Tour du Poitou-Charentes: the Grand Slam for Arnaud Démare]. Sud Ouest (in French). Groupe Sud Ouest. 24 August 2018. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  32. ^ "Arnaud Demare wins 10th stage on the Giro d'Italia". Sky Sports. Sky UK. PA Media. 22 May 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  33. ^ "Giro d'Italia: Second win for Ewan on stage 11". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 22 May 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  34. ^ Fotheringham, Alasdair (21 May 2019). "Giro d'Italia: Demare criticises fellow sprinter Ackermann". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  35. ^ "Route d'Occitanie: Demare wins stage 2". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 21 June 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  36. ^ "Valverde wins Route d'Occitanie". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 23 June 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  37. ^ "Demare wins stage 4 in Tour de Wallonie". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 30 July 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  38. ^ "Tour of Slovakia: Démare wins stage 3". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 20 September 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  39. ^ Ostanek, Daniel (21 September 2019). "Lampaert wins Tour of Slovakia". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  40. ^ Koylu, Enis (5 August 2020). "Arnaud Demare triumphs in dramatic Milano-Torino". Eurosport. Discovery, Inc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  41. ^ Ostanek, Daniel (7 July 2020). "Milano-Torino unveils flat route for 2020 edition". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  42. ^ Fletcher, Patrick (17 August 2020). "Tour de Wallonie: Démare wins in Wavre". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  43. ^ Fletcher, Patrick (19 August 2020). "Arnaud Démare wins Tour de Wallonie". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  44. ^ "Cyclisme : 3e titre de champion de France pour Arnaud Démare qui s'impose en patron devant Bryan Coquard et Julian Alaphilippe" [Cycling: 3rd French champion title for Arnaud Démare who imposes ahead of Bryan Coquard and Julian Alaphilippe]. France Info (in French). Radio France. 23 August 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  45. ^ Gonzalez, Lionel (27 August 2020). "Arnaud Démare remporte la première étape du Tour Poitou-Charentes" [Arnaud Démare wins the first stage of the Tour Poitou-Charentes]. France 3 Nouvelle-Aquitaine (in French). France 3. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  46. ^ "Tour du Poitou-Charentes : coup double pour Arnaud Demare" [Tour du Poitou-Charentes: double coup for Arnaud Demare]. L'Équipe (in French). Éditions Philippe Amaury. 28 August 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  47. ^ "Arnaud Démare remporte le Tour du Poitou-Charentes 2020" [Arnaud Démare wins the Tour du Poitou-Charentes 2020]. France 3 Nouvelle-Aquitaine (in French). France 3. 30 August 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  48. ^ Benson, Daniel (26 August 2020). "European Championships: Nizzolo wins elite men's road race title". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  49. ^ "Démare wins Tour de Luxembourg stage". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 16 September 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  50. ^ De Neef, Matt (1 October 2020). "Preview: Your guide to the 2020 Giro d'Italia contenders, sprinters and more". CyclingTips. CyclingTips Media Pty Ltd. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  51. ^ Lowe, Felix (6 October 2020). "Giro d'Italia 2020 – Arnaud Demare pips Peter Sagan to Stage 4 after crazy-close photo finish". Eurosport. Discovery, Inc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  52. ^ Lowe, Felix (8 October 2020). "Giro d'Italia 2020: Arnaud Demare doubles up to deny Peter Sagan once again". Eurosport. Discovery, Inc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  53. ^ "Giro d'Italia: Arnaud Démare leaves rivals in wake to seal sprint hat-trick". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Associated Press. 9 October 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  54. ^ "Giro d'Italia: Arnaud Demare claims his fourth victory in sprint finish". BBC Sport. BBC. 14 October 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  55. ^ "Giro d'Italia 2020 - Sprint". RTÉ Sport. Raidió Teilifís Éireann. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  56. ^ Startt, James (10 November 2020). "Arnaud Démare, Deceuninck – Quick-Step top 2020 WorldTour win list". VeloNews. Outside Media. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  57. ^ "Démare wins La Roue Tourangelle". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 5 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  58. ^ Bonville-Ginn, Tim (15 April 2021). "Arnaud Démare sprints to stage two victory in horrific conditions at Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana 2021". Cycling Weekly. Future plc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  59. ^ "Stefan Küng wins Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 18 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  60. ^ Fontaine, Benjamin (28 May 2021). "Boucles de la Mayenne 2021 : Arnaud Démare remporte la deuxième étape" [Boucles de la Mayenne 2021: Arnaud Démare wins the second stage]. France Bleu (in French). Radio France. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  61. ^ "Boucles de la Mayenne: Démare wins stage 3". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 29 May 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  62. ^ Legeay, Cyprien (30 May 2021). "Cyclisme. Boucles de la Mayenne : Arnaud Démare gagne l'étape et triomphe au général" [Cycling. Boucles de la Mayenne: Arnaud Démare wins the stage and triumphs overall]. Ouest-France (in French). Groupe Sipa - Ouest-France. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  63. ^ "Route d'Occitanie: Démare wins stage 2". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 11 June 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  64. ^ "Démare: Nothing went the way we wanted at this Tour de France". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 5 July 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  65. ^ Fotheringham, Alasdair (15 August 2021). "Démare aims to complete Grand Tour 'set' of stage wins on Vuelta a España debut". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  66. ^ "Vuelta a España: Démare takes aim at stage 5". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. 18 August 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  67. ^ "Cyclisme. Paris-Bourges : Jordi Meeus bat Arnaud Démare au sprint" [Cycling. Paris-Bourges: Jordi Meeus beats Arnaud Démare in the sprint]. Le Télégramme (in French). Groupe Télégramme. 7 October 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  68. ^ Fletcher, Patrick (10 October 2021). "Arnaud Démare wins Paris-Tours 2021". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  69. ^ "Démare's thriller". Paris–Tours. Amaury Sport Organisation. 10 October 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  70. ^ Lowe, Felix (20 May 2022). "ARNAUD DEMARE HAT-TRICK AS MARK CAVENDISH AND BREAKAWAY CRUELLY DENIED ON STAGE 13 AT GIRO D'ITALIA". Eurosport. Retrieved 1 June 2022.
{{bottomLinkPreText}} {{bottomLinkText}}
Arnaud Démare
Listen to this article

This browser is not supported by Wikiwand :(
Wikiwand requires a browser with modern capabilities in order to provide you with the best reading experience.
Please download and use one of the following browsers:

This article was just edited, click to reload
This article has been deleted on Wikipedia (Why?)

Back to homepage

Please click Add in the dialog above
Please click Allow in the top-left corner,
then click Install Now in the dialog
Please click Open in the download dialog,
then click Install
Please click the "Downloads" icon in the Safari toolbar, open the first download in the list,
then click Install
{{::$root.activation.text}}

Install Wikiwand

Install on Chrome Install on Firefox
Don't forget to rate us

Tell your friends about Wikiwand!

Gmail Facebook Twitter Link

Enjoying Wikiwand?

Tell your friends and spread the love:
Share on Gmail Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Buffer

Our magic isn't perfect

You can help our automatic cover photo selection by reporting an unsuitable photo.

This photo is visually disturbing This photo is not a good choice

Thank you for helping!


Your input will affect cover photo selection, along with input from other users.

X

Get ready for Wikiwand 2.0 🎉! the new version arrives on September 1st! Don't want to wait?